Oregon University System logo

AMENDMENT OF OAR 580-010-0035, RESIDENCE CLASSIFICATION OF ARMED FORCES PERSONNEL

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

The 71st Legislative Assembly passed, and the Governor subsequently signed, HB 2177, which expanded the definition of Armed Forces personnel eligible for consideration as Oregon residents for tuition purposes at Oregon University System (OUS) institutions. This proposed administrative rule change modifies the Board's current residency policy of OAR 580-010-0035 to be consistent with Oregon law. Because of the prior need to bring the Board's rule into conformity by July 1, 2001, this amendment was adopted as a temporary rule at the June 8, 2001, Board meeting. All rulemaking procedures have been completed and it is now proposed that the amendment be made permanent.

Since the temporary rule was adopted, a public hearing was held on September 6, 2001, to solicit comments on the proposed permanent rule change. No one appeared to offer testimony. However, brief written comments were submitted to OUS by the Oregon Student Assistance Commission (OSAC) in a memo dated July 25, 2001. OSAC (1) agreed with the need and fiscal impact statements filed with the Secretary of State for this proposed rule change; (2) suggested a remedy for a typographical error in the temporary rule (now corrected in the version below); and (3) questioned the change in definition of "dependent child" of an armed forces member from "under 24 years" to "under 23 years" (thus making the OUS residency definition of "dependent child of armed forces personnel" different than the definition of "dependent" utilized for Federal financial aid purposes).

Given that a Board member, at the June 8 Board meeting, had also raised the issue posed in (3), above, the following is noted: OUS is required to implement the provisions of HB 2177 through its rule-making procedures. The legislature defined "dependent child" in HB 2177 and OUS is without liberty to modify that definition. Further, HB 2177 and the proposed OAR relate to state regulations on residency for in-state tuition that is distinct from federal financial aid.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends the Board amend OAR 580-010-0035, Residence Classification of Armed Forces Personnel, as a permanent rule, as follows (new language is in bold text, deleted language is bracketed):

580-010-0035, Residence Classification of Armed Forces Personnel

(1) For purposes of this rule, members of the armed forces [services] means officers and enlisted personnel of:

(a) the [United States] Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard of the United States;

(b) reserve components of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard of the United States;

(c) the National Guard of the United States and the Oregon National Guard.

(2) Notwithstanding OAR 580-010-0030, members of the armed forces [services] and their spouses and dependent children shall be considered residents for purposes of the instructional fee if the members:

(a) [who] reside in this state while assigned to duty at any base, station, shore establishment or other facility in this state[,];

(b) [or while] reside in this state while serving as members of the crew of a ship that has an Oregon port of shore establishment as its home port or permanent station[,]; or [shall be considered residents for purposes of the instruction fee]

(c) reside in a foreign country and file Oregon state income taxes no later than 12 months before leaving active duty.

(3) An Oregon resident entering the armed [services] forces retains Oregon residence classification until it is voluntarily relinquished.

(4) An Oregon resident who has been in the armed [services] forces and assigned on duty outside of Oregon, including a person who establishes residency under section (2)(c) of this rule, must return to Oregon within 60 days after completing service to retain classification as an Oregon resident.

(5) A person who continues to reside in Oregon after separation from the armed [services] forces may count the time spent in the state while in the armed [services] forces to support a claim for classification as an Oregon resident.

(6) The dependent child and spouse of a person who is a resident under section (2) of this rule shall be considered an Oregon resident. "Dependent child" includes any child of a member of the armed forces who:

(a) Is under 18 years of age and not married, otherwise emancipated or self-supporting; or

(b) Is under 2[4]3 years of age, unmarried, enrolled in a full-time course of study in an institution of higher learning and dependent on the member for over one-half of his/her support.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

B.A./B.S., COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS, OSU

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Oregon State University proposes to offer the baccalaureate degree in Computational Physics, effective fall 2001. OSU currently offers an undergraduate option and a graduate area of concentration in computational physics within the physics degree at the master's and doctoral levels. No other OUS institution offers a degree in this specific field. UO has the well-established Computational Science Institute, which is an association of researchers from nine departments formed to support computational science efforts at the university. The Institute's parallel supercomputers are connected via a network to researchers around the state and to the national supercomputing centers. In addition, several members of the Institute have joined with faculty from OSU and PSU to form the Northwest Alliance for Computational Science and Engineering.

A bachelor's degree in computation science is rare in the entire country. Only Illinois State University offers a baccalaureate degree in Computational Physics. OSU is on the cutting-edge in this area. The Computational Physics textbook that OSU professors Landau and Jansen have coauthored was written, in part, to help set national and international standards for undergraduate education in computational physics. In recognition of these efforts, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure (NPACI) have provided funding for the development of this program - $400,000 from NSF to support the materials development portion of the program and $48,000 from NPACI.This proposed interdisciplinary program combines science, applied mathematics, and computer science. Students will:

Students in this major will complete 180 credits, including 115 to 116 core credits, as follows:

All but two of the core courses are currently offered.

During the summers, students may participate in computational research programs within the university and at laboratory and industrial sites. These may be:

Initially, OSU intends to enroll approximately 15 students in the major. The university is in the process of further strengthening its facilities, which will permit the department to enroll 25 to 50 students at any given time, with 10 to 20 graduates per year.

Graduates of this program will have experience conducting projects with a compiled language. Research-level problems, high-performance computing, and the use of the advanced libraries' subroutines developed at national laboratories (Netlib) need the flexibility and speed of compiled programming languages. OSU has received letters of support for this program from such groups as the Sun Microsystems group in Oregon and the San Diego Supercomputer Center. Students graduating from this program will be well-prepared to fill information technology and high-tech positions, which are identified as shortage areas in Oregon.

No additional resources will be required for this program. The grants received have enabled OSU to purchase a 20-node Beowulf supercomputing cluster. The program has also received funding from the Technology Resource Fee for a Physics and Chemistry Computer-Enhanced Learning Center in the Physics building. A prior NSF laboratory grant led to the establishment of a Computational Physics Laboratory, which is a 24-hour facility open to everyone in the department. These facilities, along with the OSU library, will provide the program with access to all requisite reference sources and computing power.

Although no new faculty hires are needed, the grants will support teaching assistants and visiting faculty in the initial years of the program. OSU expects three years of visits by Professor Paez and/or his colleagues from the University of Antioquia, Colombia, who are programming and Java experts and will assist in the development of the materials.

All appropriate University committees and the OUS Academic Council have positively reviewed the proposed program.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Oregon State University to establish a program leading to the B.A./B.S. in Computational Physics. The program would be effective fall 2001, and the OUS Office of Academic Affairs would conduct a follow-up review in the 2006-07 academic year.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

B.A./B.S./B.ED., FAMILY & HUMAN SERVICES, UO

Staff Report to the System Strategic Committee

The University of Oregon proposes to offer the baccalaureate degree in Family and Human Services, effective fall 2001. OSU and PSU offer related baccalaureate degrees. Oregon State University's B.S. in Human Development and Family Sciences is a 75-credit program with six options. One option - child, youth, and family services - is similar to UO's proposed major. The other options are quite different (e.g., gerontology, family finance, early childhood/elementary education). Also, OSU's program has more human development courses in their core requirements.

Portland State University offers the B.A./B.S. in Child and Family Studies. This interdisciplinary program requires students to complete 64 credits and choose from among six specialization areas, two of which are similar to UO's program - preparation for administration of programs for children, youth, and families; and youth worker. The other specializations differ (e.g., human development, preparation for early childhood education). Like OSU, the core requirements contain more human development courses than UO's curriculum.

UO's program will be offered by the administrative unit of Counseling Psychology and Human Services in the College of Education and will require students to complete 66 credits in the major. The program provides students with a broad understanding of prevention and intervention, professional communication, and agency policy and practices. Courses include Organizational Issues in Human Services, Child-Family Issues and Resources, Prevention of Youth Violence, Individual and Group Interventions, Healthy Families, and other relevant courses. The program has a strong experiential component. During the junior and senior years, students will participate in a total of 540 hours of supervised fieldwork in community service agencies.

Although the three OUS programs share some similarities, faculty and institutional leadership agree that student demand, societal need, and employment prospects all support the fact that there is ample room for mounting another human services program.

The University of Oregon's proposed program has grown out of an option, originally called Family and Community Services, within the Educational Studies bachelor's degree. Developed in 1996, this option was part of a program the UO called "degrees after dark," which was designed for nontraditional students who must pursue their college education on a part-time basis. Demand has been so robust in this option that faculty felt compelled to develop a proposal for a full major.

The main accrediting body in the human services profession is the National Organization for Human Service Education (NOHSE). Faculty in the Family and Human Services program will use NOHSE standards to assess the curriculum, and will initiate the accreditation process during the 2001-02 academic year, with anticipation of full accreditation by fall 2002.

Students graduating from this program will be prepared to:

Program graduates will be qualified to enter the workforce in a variety of human services fields such as case management, child abuse prevention, corrections, recreation, and youth services. At the regional and national levels, there continues to be a growing need for individuals who are trained to enter human services occupations. Of those occupations requiring a postsecondary education, human service workers are projected to be among the fastest-growing occupations between 1998 and 2008.

Current faculty, staff, research, and facility resources are sufficient to offer this program, and all budgetary requirements will be met from within the College of Education. The program enrollment will be capped at 140 students per year, with approximately 60 to 70 students graduating per year.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Board authorize the University of Oregon to establish a program leading to the baccalaureate degree in Family and Human Services. The program would be effective fall term 2001, and the OUS Office of Academic Affairs would conduct a follow-up review in the 2006-07 academic year.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

POSTDOCTORAL CERTIFICATE, HUMAN INVESTIGATIONS, OHSU

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Oregon Health and Science University proposes to offer a postdoctoral certificate in Human Investigations, effective fall 2001. This two-year program is for medical, dental, or nursing fellows and junior health sciences faculty who are interested in clinical research training. OHSU is the only institution in Oregon offering medical, dental, and advanced-degree nursing programs.

The program will include formal didactic sessions and small group learning, with active participation of the trainees. Fourteen curricular modules will be offered over a two-year period, and trainees will be required to complete 12 modules to be awarded a certificate. In addition, they must prepare an academic product (e.g., grant submission, peer-reviewed publication or thesis).

Modules will consist of lectures, seminars, problem-based learning examples, and small group work. Modules will be offered by OHSU faculty and will cover biostatistics, study design, clinical research design, molecular biology for clinical research, scientific writing and data presentation, ethics, genetics, grant writing, and other relevant topics. The sponsoring department will provide a mentor/advocate for each participant, who will meet once a week with their trainee.

An important objective of the Human Investigations program is to develop flexible methods of teaching that suit the busy committed health care professional. Plans are under way to offer on-line courses for those students who are unable to physically attend the modules. Also, courses are scheduled from 4 to 6 p.m., after clinic hours and/or rounds.

Trainees completing the program will be able to:

Student interest in the program is very high. Already 25 to 30 students anticipate entry into the program in fall 2001. OHSU intends to serve 10 to 25 students per year.

Never before has there been more promise of patient benefit delivered from a basic understanding of human health and disease, more tools to derive understanding, or more possibilities of integrating research from the laboratory bench to the bedside. New technologies, such as genomics, informatics, and large database research, and more precise clinical trial statistics and methods provide unparalleled possibilities for rapid, scientifically rooted human investigations. However, the explosion of new technologies, the increasing sophistication of the clinical trial methods, and the rising legal, regulatory, and ethical profile of human studies mandate a comprehensive set of clinical investigative skills. By offering this certificate program, OHSU will help to satisfy the need for comprehensive research training and the demand for more clinician investigators.

Oregon Health and Science University has received a five-year National Institutes of Health Clinical Research Curriculum Award. That award, along with donations from the deans of the Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, will adequately fund the program. All other faculty, staff, facilities, and research resources are sufficient to offer this program.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Oregon Health and Science University to establish a program leading to the postdoctoral certificate in Human Investigations. The program would be effective fall term 2001, and the OUS Office of Academic Affairs would conduct a follow-up review in the 2006-07 academic year.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE, NOT-FOR-PROFIT MANAGEMENT, UO

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

The University of Oregon proposes to offer a graduate certificate in Not-for-Profit Management, effective fall 2001. There are no other graduate certificate programs in not-for-profit management offered for credit in any OUS institutions at this time. PSU offers four noncredit certificates in that area, as well as a specialization in nonprofit management within the master's of Public Administration degree. PSU's Institute for Nonprofit Management, acquired from Lewis and Clark in 1996, offers graduate and noncredit courses, seminars, conferences, and workshops.

UO's program will be offered within the Department of Planning, Public Policy, and Management. Students completing the certificate program will have developed the following skills/competencies:

Students will be required to complete 24 graduate credits: 18 credits of core courses and 6 credits in approved electives. Core courses include Not-for-Profit Management I - Form and Structure; Not-for-Profit Management II - Processes and Performance; Financial Management for Public and Not-for-Profit Organizations; Resource Development for Not-for-Profit Organizations; and Grant Writing. Students with little or no not-for-profit experience are strongly encouraged to take six internship credits, which is a half-time placement (18 hours per week) in a not-for-profit organization.

Evidence of need for this program is strong. The Department has an advisory council consisting of practitioners in the state, several of whom are involved with not-for-profits. The advisory council wholeheartedly supports this proposal. One council member, who is the executive director of the United Way, thinks formal training of not-for-profit managers will help enhance the management capacity of the many not-for-profit organizations United Way funds. Oregon has a significant number of not-for-profit organizations. According to the National Center for Charitable Statistics, in 1998 there were 11,401 not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organizations in Oregon. This represents a 47 percent increase from 1992 (7,770).

The need for this graduate certificate program is not limited to the boundaries of this state. There are 1.2 million public-benefit not-for-profits in the United States (1.6 million not-for-profits of all types). In 1996, nearly 11 million people were employed in the not-for-profit sector, approximately 7 percent of the U.S. total employment.

No new resources are required to offer this program. A recent faculty search in the department resulted in hiring a professor with extensive teaching and research interests in not-for-profit management. All courses but two are currently being offered. Enrollment is anticipated at 20 to 30 students, with approximately 20 students graduating per year.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Board authorize the University of Oregon to establish a program leading to the graduate certificate in Not-for-Profit Management. The program would be effective fall term 2001, and the OUS Office of Academic Affairs would conduct a follow-up review in the 2006-07 academic year.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE, BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS, SOU

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Commitee

Southern Oregon University proposes to offer an upper-division undergraduate certificate in Business Information Systems, effective fall 2001. Three other System institutions offer related programs: OIT offers a B.S. in Management Information Systems; PSU offers an undergraduate specialization in Information Systems within its baccalaureate degree in Business; and OSU has a Management Information Systems undergraduate specialization within its bachelor's degree in Business Administration. This will be the first undergraduate certificate program in this field in the Oregon University System. Pioneer Pacific College, a proprietary school, offers a lower-division associate degree program in Business Information Systems that is vocational in nature, and Northwest Christian College offers a concentration in Management Information Systems in its B.A. in Business Administration program.

The proposed program has two focus areas: Accounting Information Systems and Management Information Systems. The Accounting Information Systems option is geared toward providing students with the accounting and technical skills needed for successful careers in accounting and accounting information systems in today's technology-oriented marketplace. The Management Information Systems option includes a combination of applied and theoretical courses in business computer applications, programming, and information systems, providing students with the skills and knowledge needed to operate and manage effectively in a high-tech environment.

All students will complete 12 core credits (advanced business applications of spreadsheets, advanced applications of databases, and programming I); 12 required credits in their focus area; and 12 elective credits, which include 1 to 4 credits of practicum.

There is both regional and national need for qualified individuals with technical expertise and competence and a strong foundation in accounting information systems or management information systems. In addition, student interest has been strong. Initially, Southern anticipates Business majors and Computer Science majors will pursue this certificate. It is estimated that approximately five students per year will graduate from this program, doubling to ten graduates per year by the fifth year.

All faculty, staff, facilities, computers, and other resources are in place to offer this program. Only one new course will need to be developed.

All appropriate university committees and the OUS Academic Council have positively reviewed the proposed program.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Southern Oregon University to establish a program leading to the undergraduate certificate in Business Information Systems, effective fall 2001. The OUS Office of Academic Affairs would conduct a follow-up review in the 2006-07 academic year.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE, MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES, SOU

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Southern Oregon University proposes to offer a program leading to an undergraduate certificate in the Management of Human Resources, effective fall 2001. Although PSU offers Human Resource Management as an option area within the baccalaureate Business degree, it is more specialized and requires 19 to 20 credits.

Southern's proposed program requires students to complete 36 credits-primarily at the upper-division level -in the areas of business, communication, and psychology. Students in this program will complete 24 core credits in such courses as organizational communication; personnel selection, appraisal, and development management; organizational psychology; and principles of human resource management. They will also be required to complete 12 elective credits in selected related areas.

Public and private organizations are dependent upon people who can effectively manage employees in the workforce. Better understanding of and communication with employees are essential to enhancing Oregon's competitive position in a global economy. This certificate program will support these fundamental workforce goals.

The primary focus of this program is on currently enrolled students in one of three majors: business, communication, or psychology. In addition, the program will be open to working professionals who qualify for admission to SOU. The program can easily accommodate the working professional because a majority of the courses required are currently offered in the evenings. Anticipating that many of the interested students will be nontraditional, a concerted effort will be made to provide additional courses at times and places most convenient to this population. The university expects 30 students per year will complete this certificate program.

Resources are sufficient to offer this program. Five full-time faculty members are in place, and no new faculty or staff will be required. In addition, all other resources are adequate to support this program.

All appropriate university committees and the OUS Academic Council have positively reviewed the proposed program.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Southern Oregon University to establish a program leading to the undergraduate certificate in the Management of Human Resources, effective fall 2001. The OUS Office of Academic Affairs would conduct a follow-up review in the 2006-07 academic year.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

[Consent Item Added to System Strategic Planning Committee Docket 10-15-01]
APPOINTMENTS AND REAPPOINTMENTS TO THE FOREST RESEARCH LABORATORY ADVISORY COMMITTEE, OSU

Summary

ORS 526.225 specifies that the Board of Higher Education shall appoint a Forest Research Laboratory Advisory Committee composed of 15 members, nine of whom are to be individuals engaged, actively and principally, in timber management of forest lands, harvesting, or processing of forest products; three individuals who are the heads of state and federal public forestry agencies; and three individuals from the public-at-large. Although the statute does not prescribe the terms of the Committee members, the practice has been to make appointments for a period of three years. Traditionally, those who are performing actively and effectively have been recommended for reappointment to a second three-year term, with all members replaced at the conclusion of a second term.

Dr. Hal Salwasser, director of the Forest Research Laboratory, with the concurrence of President Paul Risser, has made the following recommendation:

Appointment of Mr. Bill Arsenault, retired electronic engineer, Elkton, to be appointed to the Small Woodland Owner position previously held by John Foster. Mr. Arsenault retired from Roseburg Forest Products as Chief Electronics Engineer in 1992, after a 15 year career. He received an AB degree in Physics and a MS in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Mr. Arsenault is an active member of the Oregon Small Woodlands Association and currently serves as First Vice President of the statewide organization and President of Douglas Chapter Board of Directors. He is a Master Woodland Manager and has twice been named the Tree Farmer of the Year for Douglas County and in 1989 was runner up for the honor of Oregon Tree Farmer of the Year. In addition, he currently serves on the Committee for Family Forestlands, a permanent advisory to the Board of Forestry; the Advisory and Science Committees of the Umpqua Land Exchange Project; and Director of the Umpqua Basin Watershed Council. He has also served on the Governor's Forestland Taxation Task Force; ODF Landowner Assistance Task Force; Healthy Streams Task Force; ODF Small Woodland Owners Forestland Tax Work Group; Ad Hoc Forest Practices MOA Committee and the Ad Hoc Forest Practices Advisory Committee on Salmon and Watersheds (FPAC)

Appointment of Martin Goebel, President of Sustainable Northwest, Portland to the public position previously held by Barbara Craig. Ms. Craig has completed six years of service on the board. Mr. Goebel received a B.S. degree in Forestry at Oregon State University, and an M.S. at Texas A&M University in Natural Resource Conservation and Development. He has worked for the Forest Service of Mexico in community forestry and in international conservation and development with The Nature Conservancy, Conservation International (which he helped found) and the World Wildlife Fund. Mr. Goebel was recently appointed to Governor Kitzhaber's Sustainable Oregon Work Group and the US Forest Service Intelligent Consumption Project. He currently serves as Trustee of the Summit Foundation, Washington DC, and is an advisory council member of the University of Oregon's Ecosystem Workforce Program; the International Sustainable Development Foundation, Portland; Institute for the Northwest, Portland; San Diego Museum of Natural History; Mexico Nature Conservation Fund, Mexico City; and Proesteros, Ensenada, Baja California Norte.

Appointment of Dallas Stovall, president and chief executive officer of Bright Wood Corporation, Madras, as an industry representative to the position previously held by Howard Sohn. Mr. Stovall is a 1980 graduate from Southern Oregon (University) State College with a B.S. degree in Business Administration. He worked in plywood manufacturing, retail lumber home center sales, and residential and commercial fenestration sales prior to joining Bright Wood in 1984. His first position at Bright Wood was as personnel manager, later he became the operations manager, and in 1995, the president and chief executive officer.

Appointment of Ron Stuntzner, Consulting Forest Engineer and founder of the firm, Stuntzner Engineering & Forestry, Coos Bay, as an industry representative to fill the position vacated by Dick Baldwin. Mr. Stuntzner holds a B.S. degree in Forest Engineering from Oregon State University. He is a consulting forest engineer and established the Stuntzner firm in 1968. Mr. Stuntzner is experienced in the fprofessional disciplines of logging and road engineering, timber cruising and appraisal, timber marketing, forestland management and land surveying. He holds the following licenses: Professional Engineer in Oregon and Washington, Registered Professional Forester in California, Professional Land Surveyor in Oregon, and Certified Water Rights Examiner in Oregon. He was appointed to the State Board of Examiners for Engineering and Land Surveying, 2000-2004.

Reappointment for another three year term the following:

Dave Bowden, Longview Fibre Company
Debra Brosnan, Sustainable Ecosystems Institute
Richard Hanson, Weyerhaueser
Sara Vickerman, Defenders of Wildlife.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Committee forward the nominations to the Board for final approval of the above appointments and reappointments to the Forest Research Laboratory Advisory Committee.


COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

FOLLOW-UP REVIEWS CONDUCTED IN 2000-01 OF SELECTED PROGRAMS

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

In November 1990, the Board approved a policy directing the OUS Office of Academic Affairs to conduct a follow-up review of each degree program or significant new option within an existing degree program approved by the Board since January 1, 1983. The purpose of the follow-up review is to describe the status of the programs five years after their full implementation. For each program major, institutions have reported briefly on major modifications in the program, enrollment, degree production, accreditation (when applicable), resources, and student outcomes. Certificate and subdegree programs, such as teacher licensure endorsement programs, provide abbreviated information.

In July, the Board received a report of ten programs reviewed during the 2000-01 academic year. Two programs - PSU's B.A., B.S. in Environmental Studies and UO's M.A., M.S., M.Ed. in Educational Leadership - were deferred until now.

Summaries of both program reviews follow.

PSU, B.A./B.S., ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

In July 1995, the Board authorized Portland State University to offer an instructional program leading to the baccalaureate degree in Environmental Studies. Originally, students in this interdisciplinary program selected either a science or policy track. They completed general education courses, foundation courses, environmental studies core courses, connected learning electives, and a minor. Experiential learning in an agency external to the University and the senior capstone project allowed students opportunities to apply concepts, skills, and techniques learned in the classroom.

The curriculum was revised for academic year 1998-99. Although the program has retained the five original components, currently all students complete a single set of foundation courses in science, mathematics, and social science rather than a different set of foundation courses based upon which track they choose. In addition, the connected learning component was increased from 12 to 20 credits with a focus on the selected track (policy or science). The internship was made an elective, accommodating the fact that each student is required to complete a capstone project in the University Studies (i.e., general education) program. Finally, a separate laboratory section, with credit, was added to each course in the junior-level core sequence.

Only minor curricular modifications are envisioned for the future. One exception, reinstating the internship as a requirement, is currently under discussion.

Student enrollment has increased steadily since program inception, growing from 69 in 1996-97 to 116 in 2000-01. To date, 49 students have graduated.

The faculty commitment to this program has grown from 5.6 FTE in 1995 to 8.83 FTE today. This is partially a result of faculty hires and partially due to a reorganization and consolidation of the Biology Departments at PSU. The faculty have generated $2.1 million in grants over the last two years. In general, financial resources are adequate to maintain the faculty positions required to deliver the curriculum, including associated graduate-level programs. Financial resources for support staff, services and supplies, equipments, and other instructional requirements are more limited.

UO, M.A./M.S./M.ED., EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

In June 1994, the Board authorized the University of Oregon to restructure an existing instructional program leading to the M.S. degree in Educational Policy and Management, with a specialization in Instructional Leadership. In July 1997, the College of Education requested that it be given authorization to award the M.Ed. as well; that authority was granted. Then, in spring 2000, the College sought and received permission to rename the major from Educational Policy and Management to Educational Leadership.

Enrollments in the major have steadily increased from 28 in 1995-96 to 204 in 2000-01. A total of 458 degrees have been awarded since the June 1994 reorganization of the major.

UO elected to focus the follow-up review on integrated teaching (IT), which is an option added to the major in 1998 in response to the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) redesign of the state's teaching licensures. For example, because the endorsement for "severely handicapped" was eliminated, the IT program no longer offers that specialization to students. Another TSPC change was to move away from a two-tiered authorization system (i.e., elementary and secondary) to a four-tiered system (i.e., early childhood/primary grade 3; elementary K-8; middle grade 6-8; secondary grade 9-12). This required that the IT program provide student practicum and full-time student teaching consistent with receiving two authorization levels rather than one.

UO students are also offered the following specializations in the IT option: learning assessment and system performance; technology; behavioral supports; early intervention; and an add-on endorsement for English Speakers of Other Languages. These specializations enhance graduates' abilities to provide broader services to the children and district in which they work.

The program currently has 5.26 FTE faculty committed to the program. In addition, a search is under way for 1.0 FTE tenure-track faculty for the program. Resources are sufficient to offer this program although, like many programs, office space is at a premium.

REPORT OF GRIEVANCES FILED UNDER OAR 580-021-0050

The Board's grievance procedure for unclassified employees with faculty rank (Oregon Administrative Rule 580-021-0050 pertains) requires each institution to report annually the number, basis, and outcome of all formal grievances filed under the institutional procedures adopted pursuant to the rule. This report does not include grievances filed under procedures contained in collective bargaining contracts. The institutions reported, as follows, for the 2000-2001 academic year:

EOU No grievances were filed.

OIT One grievance was filed:

A faculty member alleged harassment, unethical conduct, and inappropriate behavior. The grievance was resolved at its lowest step, with the department chair.

OSU Three grievances were filed:

A fixed-term faculty member, who was not offered a subsequent appointment, filed a grievance. The administrator at the first step in the grievance process denied the grievance and the grievance was not appealed further.

A grievance was filed by a faculty member challenging a performance evaluation. The administrator at the first step in the process issued a decision granting a resolution. The grievant did not appeal.

A faculty member claimed discrimination in the filling of a vacant position. The grievant rejected the resolution proposed at the first grievance step. The president upheld the resolution, but the grievant did not accept it. To date, there has been no appeal.

PSU Four grievances were filed:

A grievance alleging unfair and inequitable treatment by a supervisor was appealed to the Chancellor's Office. Board review upheld the decision, which had also been upheld at all levels of the University.

A grievance alleging inequitable treatment of a faculty member by a departmental committee charged with review of annual tenure faculty was resolved by mutual agreement at the dean's level.

A grievance alleging unfair and inequitable treatment by non-renewal of an appointment was heard by a faculty peer hearing committee and reported to the provost. The University's actions were upheld at each level. No appeal was filed.

SOU Two grievances were filed:

A faculty member filed a grievance against the chair of the Foreign Languages Department and the dean of the School of Arts and Letters alleging discrimination regarding non-renewal of contract. A faculty grievance committee heard the case and determined there was no basis for nor evidence of discrimination. The interim president upheld the decision. It was appealed to the Chancellor's Office, and the Chancellor agreed with the president's decision. It was further appealed to the Oregon State Board of Higher Education and the Board upheld the Chancellor's decision.

A faculty member filed a grievance against the chair and dean of the School of Business and the interim president alleging being placed on administrative leave without just cause or due process, demotion for discriminatory reasons, and that Faculty Constitution Bylaws were not followed correctly in evaluations. A faculty grievance committee heard the case and presented recommendations, some favorable to the grievant and some favorable to the parties grieved against. As the interim president was named in the grievance, the recommendation for ultimate determination was forwarded to the Chancellor's Office. The Chancellor upheld the faculty grievance committee's decision, and the Board upheld the Chancellor's decision.

UO One grievance was filed:

A faculty member alleged wrongdoing on the part of the program director in connection with compensation and level of FTE. The immediate supervisor of the director reviewed the grievance and found no evidence of wrongdoing. The grievant appealed the decision and the grievance was reviewed by the Faculty Grievance Appeal Committee. The committee recommended mediation, which has taken place. To date, the grievant has filed no official response to the University's offer for resolution.

WOU One grievance was filed, but it was under the jurisdiction of the collective bargaining agreement.

SYSTEM STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE PRIORITIES AND ISSUES FOR 2001-02

Systemic Strategic Planning Committee Priorities and Issues for 2001-02

On July 19, 2001, the Board met with an AGB (Association of Governing Boards) facilitator, Terry MacTaggart, to conduct an AGB self-evaluation workshop. At the conclusion of the meeting, the Board agreed to meet again to finalize the planning exercise.

In preparation for the follow-up meeting, Director Lehmann, incoming chair of the System Strategic Planning Committee, asked Board members and Presidents to comment on the strategic planning agenda for this academic year. A summary of these ideas was presented by Dr. MacTaggart at the September 28, 2001, Board planning meeting.

During the meeting, Dr. MacTaggart assisted the Board in identifying ways to increase efficiencies while balancing the needs of the System, to maintain the public's confidence in the use of public resources while simultaneously delegating a degree of autonomy to campuses in order that they may meet the individual needs of their students. Dr. MacTaggart also reviewed the Board's objectives toward developing a creative, competitive, educated, and skilled citizenry and workforce to meet the overarching goal of improving economic development and providing opportunities for growth in Oregon communities. To that end, Dr. MacTaggart suggested the following planning calendar for the System Strategic Planning Committee (further advice was solicited from Board members and presidents):Dr. MacTaggart recommends:

"1. Determine the most effective balance between centralization and campus autonomy within the System and review alternative system models.

In any complex organization like the Oregon University System, there are perennial and legitimate discussions of the appropriate balance between central coordination and control, on the one hand, and the opportunity for creativity and entrepreneurship on the other. The current trend nationally within higher education systems is toward greater decentralization and deregulation, although each state has evolved a unique equation balancing authority and autonomy.

Oregon has deregulated its higher education system to a modest extent in recent years, but much of this devolution has occurred between state regulatory agencies and the System office. Within the System itself, the Chancellor pursues a consensus-oriented approach to decision making, but the System itself continues to exercise central control over budget, new program approval, internal audit and other activities. In addition, the System provides some services, such as legal affairs, for some but not all of the universities.

In a time of tight resources and increased expectations for campuses to respond entrepreneurially to state and regional needs, it makes sense to grant university presidents more freedom of action. At the same time, the Board of Directors and the citizens need to feel confident that public resources are being efficiently deployed and that public needs not addressed by the free market do not fall through the cracks.

A discussion of the optimal balance between freedom and control might begin with these questions:

A review of the alternative system models might consider the following models:

Additionally, the Board will review other potential sources of revenue.

2. Broaden the System's Participation in Oregon's Economic Development

The universities in Oregon represent the best hope for the state's continued transition from a resource-based economy to one that takes greater advantage of the brainpower of its citizens. All of the campuses currently contribute to this effort through a variety of means including pure and applied research, research and technology transfer, preparation of a skilled and well educated employment force, as well as consulting and other direct services to business and multiple services to their communities. The three research universities are distinctive in their research mission, while the other institutions contribute primarily by disseminating knowledge in formal courses, applying research to solve community and economic problems and through a host of other means.

It is also true that both economic development and higher education's response to it has been uneven. At least up to the current recession, the Willamette valley has enjoyed the bulk of the growth while many rural areas suffer depopulation and economic decline.

The System has responded both to the demands of the business, and especially the high technology community, and the uneven development patterns in its legislative request. Now that the session is ended and the decisions of the legislature are reasonably clear, it would seem timely for the Directors to take a systematic and measured view of the next steps needed to broaden the economic development agenda.

Here are some suggested points of departure for such a discussion:

3. Strengthen the Linkage to P-14

Many in the Oregon University System, the state's community college system and its P-12 system report that working relations among the three are among the best in the nation. However, knowledgeable persons would agree that there is room for improvement. Stronger working linkages are especially important as the state addresses the problems of losing many of its best-prepared students to out-of-state schools, and as it organizes itself to better prepare high school graduates for postsecondary education.

Since most educational leaders in Oregon are so intimately involved in efforts to strengthen relations among components of the education system, the time may be right to bring in a knowledgeable outsider to assess and comment upon the results of current initiatives. The Western Interstate Compact on Higher Education might well be the appropriate group to work with the Joint Boards to address the following questions:

While not listed as a separate area of inquiry and action, as the strategic planning process moves forward it will be important to design and implement a strategic communications plan as well. The purpose of this plan would be to enable the people of Oregon to see that higher education is indeed the best (in fact, the only) path to a brighter economic future and Oregon's public universities are well positioned to help the people meet their educational, economic and personal goals.

The starting point for this communications effort is listening. The System would be well advised to develop a series of opportunities for citizens across the state to have input on the University's goals and directions. Teams of Directors might be scheduled to visit groups at universities, in schools, government venues, work places and other locations throughout the state. Meetings should include not only acknowledged state and local leaders, but alumni, students, representatives of a spectrum of interest groups and some of the "ordinary-extraordinary" people of the state.

In sum, pursuit of these three interrelated themes constitutes a worthwhile and ambitious plan of work for the strategic planning committee. Properly managed, however, planning around these topics would make a powerful contribution both to higher education and to the economic well being of Oregon's people."

Oregon University System logo

Attachment "A"

Board System Strategic Planning Committee
Summary Calendar of Events

Month

Committee Meeting Date

Event/Topic

October 2001 October 19 (OIT) Discuss and adopt planning calendar; discussion of possible regional forums
December 2001 December 7



December 20 (PSU)



December 21 (PSU)
Joint Boards Meeting on economic forecasting and workforce needs and linkages to K-14

2-5 p.m. Joint Committee meeting for review of alternative system models

Most effective balance between centralization and campus autonomy
Winter/Spring   Board visits/town meetings -- January, February, March, April
February 2002 February 15 (UO)
Budget/Strategic Planning Renewal
System participation in Oregon's economic and workforce development
November 2002   Public opinion survey
April 2002 April 19 (OHSU) Strengthen the linkage to P-14
June 2002 June 21 (PSU) Discuss proposed strategic communications plan
July 2002 July 19 (PSU) Approval of budget that reflects strategic planning
August 2002 No meeting  
Fall/Winter 2002   Board visits/town hall meetings -- September, October, November, January



Oregon University System logo

Attachment "B"

Board System Strategic Planning Committee
Calendar of Events

Month

Committee Meeting Date

Event/Topic

October 2001 October 19 (OIT)

Consent agenda:

  • Proposed New Academic Programs
November 2001 November 16 (PSU)  
December 2001 December 21 (PSU)

Consent agenda:

  • Proposed New Academic Programs

Report items:

  • System/Campus Report on Performance Indicators
  • Performance Funding Recommendations
  • Distance Education Update
  • One Year Later: Advanced Degree Completers
January 2002 January 18 (PSU)  
February 2002 February 15 (UO)

Action items:

  • Undergraduate Admission Policy for 2003-04
  • Honorary Doctorates

Consent agenda:

  • Proposed New Academic Programs

Report items:

  • Update on Implementation of Proficiency-based Admission Standards System (PASS) Project
  • Update on Center for Applied Japanese Language Studies
  • FY Federal Appropriations
March 2002 March 15 (PSU)  
April 2002 April 19 (OHSU)

Consent agenda:

  • Proposed New Academic Programs

Report items:

  • Student, Faculty, & Staff Racial/Ethnic Diversity in OUS
May 2002 May 17 (PSU)  
June 2002 June 21 (PSU)

Consent agenda:

  • Proposed New Academic Programs

Report items:

  • Where Have Oregon's Graduates Gone?
July 2002 July 19 (PSU)

Consent agenda:

  • Proposed New Academic Programs

Report items:

  • Progress Report on Implementation of OSU-Cascades Campus
  • Status Reports on CAPITAL Center & Southwestern Oregon University Center
  • Five-Year Follow-up Review of Selected Programs
  • Status of WICHE/WUE Programs
August 2002 No meeting  
September 2002 September 20 (PSU)  
October 2002 October 18 (SOU)

Consent agenda:

  • Proposed New Academic Programs
November 2002 November 15 (PSU)  
December 2002 December 20

(CAPITAL Center)

Consent agenda:

  • Proposed New Academic Programs

Report items:

  • System/Campus Report on Performance Indicators
  • Performance Funding Recommendations
  • Distance Education Update
January 2003 January 17 (PSU)  
February 2003 February 21 (OSU)

Consent agenda:

  • Proposed New Academic Programs

Action items:

  • Undergraduate Admission Policy for 2004-05
  • Honorary Doctorates

Report items:

  • Update on Implementation of Proficiency-based Admission Standards System (PASS) Project
  • Update on Center for Applied Japanese Language Studies
  • One Year Later (two reports: one for bachelor's graduates and one for advanced degree completers)
  • FY Federal Appropriations
March 2003 March 21 (PSU)  
April 2003 April 18 (WOU)

Consent agenda:

  • Proposed New Academic Programs

Report items:

  • Student, Faculty, & Staff Racial/Ethnic Diversity in OUS

Reports to the Legislature:

  • Faculty Work & Results
  • SB 919
  • Minority Teacher Act Report
May 2003 May 16 (PSU)  
June 2003 June 20 (EOU)

Consent agenda:

  • Proposed New Academic Programs
July 2003 July 18 (PSU)

Consent agenda:

  • Proposed New Academic Programs

Report items:

  • Progress Report on Implementation of OSU-Cascades Campus
  • Status Reports on CAPITAL Center & Southwestern Oregon University Center
  • Five-Year Follow-up Review of Selected Programs
  • Status of WICHE/WUE Programs

List of Issues To Be Scheduled


Attachment "C"

Proposal for Discussion

Oregon University System
Office of Corporate and Public Affairs
Citizen Engagement Plan 2002


Background

The Oregon State Board of Higher Education's System Strategic Planning Committee is developing a series of strategic planning goals for 2002-03. Critical to the accomplishment of these goals will be additional citizen engagement and input to develop a broad base of understanding for the direction of the Oregon University System as it begins fiscal and programmatic planning for the 2003-2005 biennium and beyond. To assist the System Strategic Planning Committee and the Board in improving its outreach to Oregonians, an aggressive communications plan is proposed herein.

Goal

This plan envisions a series of tactical communications activities. The goal of the plan is to build support for the strategic planning initiatives of the Oregon State Board of Higher Education by establishing a statewide communications network of community, business, government and campus leaders to broaden public understanding of the Board's strategic initiatives and to provide systemic delivery of information and feedback to key constituents through Oregon.

The Plan

Central to the development of the plan is the System Strategic Planning Committee's establishment of goals for 2002. A consultant has suggested that the Committee aim to:

1. Determine the most effective balance between centralization and campus autonomy, and review alternative system models;
2. Broaden the Oregon University System's participation in the state's economic and workforce development; and
3. Strengthen educational linkages to public and private schools throughout the P-14 educational continuum.

Further, the consultant has suggested that SSP Committee be proactive in engaging public dialogue about these initiatives.

To facilitate that engagement, this plan proposes a series of "Town Hall Meetings" during which Board members and staff will openly solicit public comment on the key policy questions posed by these initiatives. Participation will be by invitation only and will target campus and community leaders, including mayors, city and county commissioners, key business leaders, faculty and student leaders, economic development leaders, and regional leadership from chambers of commerce.

The "Town Hall Meetings" will be held in both campus and non-campus communities. Campus administration will be asked to host sessions in their respective communities with select Board members and help to facilitate both the discussion and the collection of data. Chancellor's Office staff will assist Board members in arranging and hosting similar "Town Hall Meetings" in communities that are not specifically home communities to OUS institutions. Targeted as sites for the campus community visitations are Ashland, Coos Bay (the host site for the Southwestern Oregon University Center), Corvallis, Eugene, La Grande, Monmouth and Portland. Regional meetings are proposed for Hillsboro, Salem, Redmond and The Dalles. The proposed meetings will be held from January through April 2002.

In conjunction with the meetings, all participants will be invited to participate in an ongoing communications network with the Oregon State Board of Higher Education. The electronic network will utilize an engagement technology known as SurveyPoint. The technology is an integrated electronic system that uses Web, voice mail, and email technologies to gather and disseminate information 24 hours per day, seven days per week. The technology allows participants to engage in a virtual discussion group. Using the technology, the State Board of Higher Education can periodically pose questions to the virtual discussion group and gather nearly instantaneous feedback from participants. The service provides real-time monitoring and the ability to generate statistical reports.

Simultaneous with the use of the SurveyPoint technology, the plan proposes that participants be subscribed to the Oregon University System's monthly electronic newsletter, titled "@ OUS," to receive periodic information that will help them learn about campus achievements and system initiatives.

Once the new network has been established and the scheduled "Town Hall Meetings' completed, the plan proposes to develop a summary report for the System Strategic Planning Committee on aggregate public perceptions to the State Board's Strategic Initiatives and a series of Key Messages to help the State Board communicate the direction it chooses in preparing the 2003-2005 biennial budget request for the Oregon University System.

The plan also proposes that a second series of "Town Hall Meetings" be organized from September 2002 to January 2003 to reinforce the communications networking and key budgetary messages for the 2003 Legislative Assembly. To augment information that will help to shape those messages and strategies, the plan also recommends that the Oregon University System continue its biennial practice of conducting a statewide public opinion poll in November 2002 to pulse general attitudes and environment trends leading to the new legislative session.