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RESOLUTION REGARDING CLASSIFIED INFORMATION FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, PSU

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

The Industrial Security Manual issued by the U.S. Department of Defense requires that owners, officers, and executive personnel of corporations and regents or trustees of colleges and universities whose employees have access to classified material in the course of working on Department of Defense contracts delegate to others the authority for fulfilling the requirements of the Industrial Security Manual and exclude themselves from access to classified information.

The resolution recommended for adoption is required by the Manual.

RESOLUTION

WHEREAS, current Department of Defense directives contain a provision making it mandatory that the university president, and all principal officers or officials who are specifically and properly designated by the Board as the managerial group with the authority and responsibility for the negotiation, execution, and administration of classified contracts, meet the personnel security clearances requirements established for a contractor's facility security clearance; and

WHEREAS, said Department of Defense directives permit the exclusion from the personnel clearance requirements of certain members of the Board and other officers, provided that this action is recorded in the corporate minutes.

NOW IT IS FURTHER DECLARED that the president, and all principal officers or officials who are specifically and properly designated by the Board as the managerial group with the authority and responsibility for the negotiation, execution, and administration of classified contracts, at the present time do possess, or shall be processed for, the required security clearance; and

BE IT RESOLVED that in the future, when any individual enters upon any duties as president, as one of the principal officers or officials who are specifically and properly designated by the Board as the managerial group with the authority and responsibility for the negotiation, execution, and administration of classified contracts, such individuals shall immediately make application for the required security clearance; and

BE IT RESOLVED FURTHER that the following members of the Board and other officers, shall not require, shall not have, and can be effectively excluded from access to all classified information in the possession of Portland State University, and do not occupy positions that would enable them to affect adversely corporate policies or practices in the performance of classified contracts for the Department of Defense or the User Agencies of the National Industrial Security Program.

Name; Title

Don VanLuvanee; Board President
Jim Lussier; Board Vice President
Herbert Aschkenasy; Board Member
Shawn Hempel; Board Member
Tom Imeson; Board Member
Leslie Lehmann; Board Member
Geraldine Richmond; Board Member
William H. Williams; Board Member
Jim Willis; Board Member
Phyllis Wustenberg; Board Member
Tim Young; Board Member

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends the Board adopt the following resolution regarding access to classified information related to the Department of Defense material.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

AGREEMENT TO TRANSFER CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE AND PARAMEDIC EDUCATION ACADEMIC PROGRAMS FROM OHSU TO OIT

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) and Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) have mutually agreed to transfer two OHSU allied health programs, Clinical Laboratory Science (Medical Technology) and Paramedic Education, to OIT in fall 2001 pending Oregon State Board of Higher Education approval and completion of a detailed memorandum of agreement effecting this change. Board of Higher Education authorizations for these two programs have been in place for a considerable period of time: since 1933 in Clinical Laboratory Science, and 1977 in Paramedic Education. As of September 24, 2001, OIT will assume academic, administrative, and fiscal responsibilities for these programs. The present OHSU program personnel will be employed by OIT. For the Clinical Laboratory Science program, OIT will lease the present OHSU program facilities, including classrooms, laboratories, and offices. For the Paramedic Education program, OIT will use facilities at the Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue Academy. Notwithstanding the program transfer, the two institutions agree that it is to their mutual advantage and to that of the students to collaborate extensively in the offering of the programs. Consistent with the intent of Oregon Laws 1999, Chapter 291, Section 16, ORS 353.440 (relating to the Oregon Health Sciences University) that a coordinated approach be taken by the Oregon University System institutions and OHSU when academic programs are related or integrated, this is a transfer of programs within the extended family and a plan for collaboration between the institutions.

OHSU and OIT began preplanning discussions over a year ago, when OHSU decided to move in the direction of phasing out of undergraduate allied health education in order to sharpen its mission focus on graduate education and research areas. At the same time, OIT has considered how to strategically manage an expanded programmatic presence in the Portland area.

OIT has a focused mission that includes engineering and health technologies, management, communications, and applied sciences with an expectation that its technology education should be delivered statewide. OIT currently offers allied health programs in Dental Hygiene, Radiologic Science, Sonography, Vascular Technology, and Health Sciences. In fall 2000, the headcount enrollment in these programs was 650 students. The addition of the Clinical Laboratory Science and Paramedic Education programs will expand the complement of allied health programs offered by OIT. Since these two programs will continue to be offered in Portland, they fit well with OIT's strategic objective of providing access to both engineering technology and health technology in the metropolitan area. OIT is thus expanding its statewide array of allied health programs as well as enhancing its strategic objective of expansion in the Portland area. The projected enrollment for the additional programs is 45 students (headcount) for fall 2001.

A business plan that contains an analysis of revenue and expenses has been prepared. It is cost-effective to manage these programs as a pair in Portland. There is an opportunity to expand both programs through scheduling and marketing initiatives since the demand for graduates in these professional areas is growing. As part of the administrative transition, details about personnel and student services will be included in an agreement between OHSU and OIT.

Both programs are accredited: Clinical Laboratory Science by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS), and Paramedic Education by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) of the American Medical Association. These associations will be notified of the program transfers and the collaborative nature of the agreement. Similarly, OIT will confer with the Northwest Association's Commission on Colleges regarding the curricular changes. Preliminary investigation does not indicate that accreditation will be problematic under the new arrangements.

A detailed memorandum of agreement is well along in development. It includes the following major principles:

In addition, OHSU proposes to provide consultative support for accreditation transition purposes. Coordination of clinical sites with OIT and sharing OHSU expertise in these fields will provide another focus of collaboration.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that OIT be authorized to accept the transfer of the bachelor's degree program in Clinical Laboratory Science and the undergraduate certificate program in Paramedic Education from OHSU, effective September 2001, contingent upon the Chancellor's review and approval of the terms set forth in a memorandum of agreement between Oregon Health and Science University and Oregon Institute of Technology.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

FOLLOW-UP REVIEWS CONDUCTED IN 2000-01 OF SELECTED PROGRAMS

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

In November 1990, the Board approved a policy directing the OUS Office of Academic Affairs to conduct a follow-up review of each degree program or significant new option within an existing degree program approved by the Board since January 1, 1983. The purpose of the follow-up review is to describe the status of the programs five years after their full implementation. For each program major, institutions have reported briefly on major modifications in the program, enrollment, degree production, accreditation (when applicable), resources, and student outcomes. Certificate and subdegree programs, such as teacher licensure endorsement programs, provide abbreviated information.

During the 2000-01 academic year, the following programs were reviewed:

Oregon State University

Portland State University

Southern Oregon University

University of Oregon

Western Oregon University

Oregon State University/Portland State University

Two programs-PSU's B.A./B.S. in Environmental Studies and UO's M.A., M.S., M.Ed. in Educational Leadership-will be deferred until a later date.

Summaries of the ten program reviews follow.

B.S., ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, OSU

In July 1995, the Board authorized Oregon State University to offer an instructional program leading to the baccalaureate degree in Environmental Engineering. The program provides students with coursework in water and wastewater treatment, hazardous wastes, air pollution control, and environmental health. The total credits required for this degree are 192. Minor curricular modifications have been made, but the overall credit requirement has remained unchanged. Currently, students are required to complete three additional credits in the area of communication skills and four more in technical coursework, and complete seven fewer credits in mathematics and basic science. A professional practice course is now required of all graduates.

Environmental engineering students entering the program in fall term 2001 will participate in a "Design Across the Curriculum" experience, to be implemented across the department. The four-year program will be integrated within existing coursework and culminate in the senior capstone design project. The capstone project will combine structural, transportation, geotechnical, water resource, and environmental engineering students into multi-disciplinary teams. Each team will be expected to complete a significant, open-ended design project.

Internships are not required by this program; however, students may choose to participate in a cooperative internship, which adds one year to the time to complete the degree. For the 2000-01 academic year, 12 junior/senior environmental engineering students are involved in this internship opportunity.

Current enrollment in the major is 69 students. The number of degrees awarded to date is 28. The program appears to have reached a steady level, with enrollment of approximately 70 students and a graduation rate of about 15 students. Approximately 60 percent of graduates are employed immediately after graduation, either by the U.S. government or the private sector. Most of the remaining graduates have gone on to further education.

Although students may choose to take a Fundamental of Engineering (FE) examination during the spring term of their final year, data on the pass rates of the students are not available from the agency sponsoring the exam. Students from the OSU program can be licensed as environmental engineers in the State of Oregon.

The program was accredited by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET) in 1998, and will be reviewed by ABET in 2002 for renewal. The program also has an advisory board, whose membership consists of representatives from industry and the public sector (e.g., Chevron, AMEC, CH2M-Hill), which meets twice a year.

All faculty, facility, and library resources are adequate to meet the needs of this program.

B.A./B.S., ETHNIC STUDIES, OSU

In February 1995, the Board authorized Oregon State University to offer an instructional program leading to the baccalaureate degree in Ethnic Studies. The program, which was to be implemented in fall 1995, was not fully implemented until fall 1998 because all the faculty hires had not occurred. In 1996-97, two faculty members offered a limited number of courses. Currently, all four full-time faculty members are in place and 34 new courses have been developed.

The program has changed little from its inception. Students complete 21 credits of core coursework, including a 9-credit community internship (reduced from the original 12 credits); and 30 credits in two areas of emphasis on specific ethnic groups.

Through spring 2001, nine degrees have been awarded. Currently, 27 students are majoring in the program and, of these, six are double majors. Students have interned in such agencies/areas as:

In addition to working 30 hours a week on site for ten weeks, student interns must keep a journal, write a paper summarizing their internship experience, and make an oral presentation of their paper to the faculty and majors of the Department of Ethnic Studies.

Although information on graduates of this program is incomplete, faculty have learned that some of their students have gone on to further education at the graduate level and work in social service agencies and ethnic family centers.

An important program objective has been to serve as a critical bridge between the state's ethnic minority communities and OSU. A number of Ethnic Studies courses have been delivered to the Warm Springs and Grande Ronde Reservations, as well as the University Centers in Bend and Coos Bay. In addition, the Sacred Landscapes Conference has been held on the OSU campus in spring 1999 and 2000. This conference brought together Native American scholars, elders, and community leaders to discuss various facets of their cultures and environment. Also, the spring break field course, which has been offered four times under the titles "Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Ag. Labor: Learning Through Listening" and "Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Education: Learning Through Listening," has attracted students from a broad spectrum of departments and colleges. Last year, this gained an Oregon Innovators in Education Award of $6,000. For many students in the class, this represented the first time they had interacted with adults from minority groups.

A $15,000 grant was acquired by Professor Sakurai from the Civil Liberties Public Education Fund in 1997 for a K-12 Conference/Workshop on Japanese American internment camps. The primary resource needs for this program are library and computer equipment. As with the majority of departments in the College of Liberal Arts, there is no additional source of funding for these areas beyond the College and the library.

B.A./B.S., COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, PSU

In September 1995, the Board authorized Portland State University to offer a program leading to the baccalaureate degree in Community Development. This is an interdisciplinary, applied major with two areas of concentration: (1) community organization and change, and (2) housing and economic development. Community development has roots in both professional fields (e.g., social work, urban and regional planning) and disciplinary fields (e.g., urban economics, rural sociology), as well as in popular movements that include environmental stewardship, social equality, etc. Students in the program complete 67 credits in the major, including 30 credits in the chosen concentration; 12 credits of core colloquium; 6 credits of statistics and analytic methods; 9 credits of sociology, economics, and political science; and 6 credits in supervised field research or internship. Courses for the degree are offered through PSU degree-completion centers in Salem, at OIT Metro Center, and at the CAPITAL Center, as well as on the PSU campus.

Since program implementation, a third area of concentration has been added, communications and community development, which includes courses from the Department of Speech Communication such as Intercultural Communication, Political Communication, Communication and Gender, and Urban Communication. No other substantial program modifications are anticipated; however, the program is undergoing assessment as part of PSU's internal management activities and, consequently, some suggestions for change may be made.

Currently, 50 students have declared Community Development as their major in the 2000-01 academic year. This number is consistent with the projected rate of growth in the original program proposal. Since program implementation, 37 students have been awarded degrees in this major. Each year, two to three graduates of this program enter PSU's graduate-level Urban and Regional Planning or Urban Studies program. Others have pursued graduate degrees in social work and law. Those seeking employment have found opportunities in nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and businesses.

The program has helped attract external funding to PSU. Community Development capstone seminars are a component of a substantial Ford Foundation grant given to the Institute for Portland Metropolitan Studies for the development of a community-oriented geographic information system. In addition, the existence of this major helped the University obtain funding to develop a Community Development Institute for Oregon practitioners, which was offered through the School of Extended Studies and College of Urban and Public Affairs.

Current faculty, staff, library, and facility resources are sufficient to continue offering this program.

B.A./B.S., ANTHROPOLOGY, SOU

In July 1995, the Board authorized Southern Oregon University to offer an instructional program leading to the baccalaureate degree in Anthropology. The orientation of the major is toward applied anthropology.

A few minor curricular changes have occurred over the past five years. Some were due to staffing constraints, and the "applied" requirement was elaborated and moved to the 400 level. Students now choose between two options: Applied Anthropology, a course with a broader disciplinary orientation, or Cultural Resource Management, a course with an archaeological orientation.

Students in the major complete 52 credits, including four credits of methods, eight credits of theory, and eight credits of practicum/capstone. Students are individually mentored to develop internship placements that will provide experiences reflective of their interests and conducive to future work or graduate school success. Currently, 24 students are majoring in Anthropology at Southern. Forty-nine degrees have been awarded to date, with a total of 16 more expected to be awarded in this academic year. Of those who have already graduated, 21 are pursuing further education and 11 are employed in a field related to their major.

Grants generated through this program to date total $179,412, all of which have had an archaeological focus. Granting bodies include the National Science Foundation, Wenner-Gren Foundation, State of Oregon, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, Cultural Solutions, and Klamath Cultural Resources Evaluation, Inc.

Library, lab, and instructional video resources are sufficient for this program, and campus computer facilities are adequate to meet student needs. The Geography Department has a GIS-focused computer lab and welcomes Anthropology majors to share these resources. The archaeology lab is well-equipped in terms of equipment, and artifact and skull collections. Considerable faculty effort has been expended on securing funds for equipment and the upgrading of collections and computers.

The program maintains productive partnerships with federal agencies, Indian tribes, local schools, regional businesses and social service agencies, and local practicing anthropologists (including those at the National Forensics Laboratory). These partnerships support the program's applied orientation. Those students with the cultural anthropology focus lack any working space in which to collaborate on projects and discuss ideas, however. This limits SOU's ability to conduct ongoing group research projects or an applied cultural anthropology field school.

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE, APPLIED CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, SOU

In July 1995, the Board authorized Southern Oregon University to offer an instructional program leading to the undergraduate certificate in Applied Cultural Anthropology. Students complete 36 credits: 20 core credits, and 14 to 16 credits with a specialized focus, including 8 credits of practicum/capstone. This certificate program prepares students for careers in human services, multicultural education, and other fields where cross-cultural or international perspectives are essential. Emphasis is placed on culturally related problems, preparing research designs, collecting and analyzing data, and recommending policy.

Three main modifications have been made to the program. The most important change was to include a new requirement, Cross-Cultural Perspectives, from which students must select one course from five alternatives. The purpose of this requirement was to ensure that all students have some understanding of non-western societies/cultures and thus develop some ability to analyze Western values, assumptions, and world view as cultural constructions.

A second change was to require Practicing Anthropology for all certificate students. This course focuses on developing student skills in analysis, writing, and critical thinking as these are practiced in anthropology; involves them in a small library research project; and demonstrates how anthropology's four complementary subfields facilitate holistic understanding of a given topic.

Finally, Uses of Anthropology was transformed into a senior-level course, Applied Anthropology, and given a more theoretical and comparative orientation.

To date, all students earning this certificate have been anthropology majors. The number of certificates awarded annually has fluctuated from zero to eight, with ten anticipated in 2000-01. Generally, about half of all culturally focused Anthropology majors pursue this certificate.

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE, CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, SOU

In July 1995, the Board authorized Southern Oregon University to offer an instructional program leading to the undergraduate certificate in Cultural Resource Management. This program prepares students for careers in the management and preservation of prehistoric and historic cultural sites located on public and private lands. Emphasis is placed upon methods and the development and implementation of research designs. Students complete 35 to 37 credits: 21 core credits, and 14 to 16 credits in a specialized focus, which includes 8 practicum/capstone credits.

Three program modifications have been implemented or planned. The first involved combining two 200-level courses into a single introductory course. As a result, Practicing Anthropology, the writing/research course in anthropology, was added as a Certificate requirement without increasing the overall credit requirement.

The second change was to combine separate breadth requirements in history and geography/biology together, forming a Policy Perspectives section.

The third change, which will be implemented in 2001-02, is a Specialized Skill requirement that will be added to ensure that all students have at least a basic introduction to the technical skills that are important in cultural resource management work. Four credits of coursework in GIS, GPS, remote sensing, cartography, or stratigraphy are required, although SOU encourages students to pursue additional coursework in these skill areas as well. To accommodate this change, specialized focus electives will be reduced from 12 to 8 credits.

Most Anthropology majors with a focus in archaeology consider working toward this certificate. The number of certificates awarded has ranged from zero to two annually, with three expected to be awarded in 2000-01. Only one non-Anthropology major (in Environmental Studies) has completed this certificate thus far, and one post-baccalaureate student who originally began working toward this certificate decided instead to pursue a second bachelor's degree.

B.S., ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES, SOU

In April 1994, the Board authorized Southern Oregon University to offer an instructional program leading to the baccalaureate degree in Environmental Studies. The program is offered by the School of Science in cooperation with the departments of biology, chemistry, geography, and geology. Students choose one of these four areas as their focus, completing 36 credits in that specialized area of study, in addition to the environmental studies core. No major program modifications have occurred.

The program was implemented fall 1994, and since then has experienced enrollment and graduation numbers anticipated in the original proposal. Currently, 110 students are majoring in Environmental Studies, and 53 students have graduated to date. Strategic planning at SOU suggests that this program has definite growth potential should additional resources become available; if that happens, the program may add a fifth option in the area of social sciences.

Internships and practica are not required in the program; nevertheless, students are encouraged to seek such opportunities. Faculty at SOU have worked with local resource agencies to develop practicum experiences for students. Examples of those include:

Graduates of the program who have maintained contact with the program indicate employment with such agencies/businesses as the Bureau of Land Management, Department of Environmental Quality, Oregon Fish and Wildlife, Jackson County, Shell Oil, the Rogue Valley Council of Governments, as well as private consulting firms.

Faculty, staff, library, and computer facilities are adequate for this program. A problem with this, as with most interdisciplinary programs, is the lack of a "home space" in which students may meet and study. Nevertheless, the program remains strong and student demand continues to be robust.

B.A./B.S., ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES, UO

In February 1995, the Board authorized the University of Oregon to offer an instructional program leading to the baccalaureate degree in Environmental Studies. This interdisciplinary major would not offer any specific tracks or areas of concentration. Rather, students would take four lower-division science courses and introductory-level courses that connect the environment to the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Also, all students would take at least three upper-division natural science electives and at least three upper-division social science or humanities electives, as well as a 400-level interdisciplinary Environmental Issues course. The purpose was to emphasize "spreading the student into different disciplines, rather than encouraging narrower tracks."

The major has undergone significant revision since inception, the result being a stronger and clearer major than established in the original proposal. Of chief concern among faculty and some students was the lack of depth and coherence in the original major. In fall 1997, the faculty approved changes in the science requirements; students would complete a lower-division science sequence in one area rather than one class from four disciplines. The committee also added a math requirement to aid student performance in science courses.

In fall 1999, other curricular changes were implemented. The number of credits required were increased from 64 to 84; the upper-division science requirement was reduced from three courses to two; and students would complete ten courses in the social sciences and humanities areas, including four each from two thematic groups: (1) Landscape: History and Place; and (2) Environmental Representation and Values: Science Studies; Political Economy; Environmental Policy and Planning; and International Development. Students are required to complete two capstone experiences: one four-credit "issues" course, usually a 400-level class dealing with cutting-edge issues and research; and a practical learning experience requirement (e.g., internship, Student-Initiated Project, field station experience). Students generally select internships in the areas of ecology, education, recycling, advocacy, and food provisioning. Typical sponsors include government agencies, nonprofit organizations, private businesses or corporations, organic farms, and campus groups. The Environmental Studies program maintains a Web site with over 100 current and ongoing internship opportunities both locally and out of state.

The Student-Initiated Project option is a unique type of learning experience offered to outstanding and creative students in the program. In this option, students design an individualized course of study around an environmental theme of their choosing. This option is similar to an undergraduate thesis in that the student is expected to conduct extensive research and reading and to produce a substantial written paper or project at the end. The intent of this option is to offer an educational experience not available in an ordinary classroom setting. Samples of Student-Initiated Projects include:

Student response to this new major was immediate and robust. Six-hundred four degrees have been awarded to date, with 115 to be awarded this academic year. Currently, over 250 students are majoring in Environmental Studies. That number was even higher before fall 1999, when UO implemented the bachelor's degree program in Environmental Science.

A recent survey of Environmental Studies alumni revealed that they hold a range of environmentally related positions such as scientists/researchers for public and private agencies; teachers and environmental educators; Peace Corps volunteers; and founders of environmentally related businesses, consulting firms, and nonprofit organizations. They also tend to enter graduate programs in environmentally related fields such as geography, biology, environmental science or management, and urban and regional planning.

The program draws from faculty across many departments, so the faculty base continues to be strong. The program currently has partial funding to recruit two additional faculty, which will be housed in other academic departments and shared with the Environmental Studies program. However, limited program space remains an issue.

TEACHER LICENSURE ENDORSEMENT, EARLY INTERVENTION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION, WOU

In July 1995, the Board authorized Western Oregon University to offer an instructional program leading to the teacher licensure endorsement in Early Intervention and Special Education. This is a field of specialized study that focuses on children from birth to age five who have disabilities or who are at high risk for disabilities, and their families.

The program prepares graduate students for two major roles: early intervention specialist and early childhood special educator. Early intervention specialists serve children ages birth to three years and their families. Services include intake, assessment for eligibility, development of Individualized Family Services Plans, parent training, case management, and transition to preschool programs. Early childhood special educators serve children ages three to five and their families. Two major models are used to provide services: the self-contained preschool for children with special needs, and the consultant model. The early childhood special educator provides direct service to children in the self-contained model, and collaborates with regular preschool teachers to make adaptations and accommodations in the consultant model. In both cases, the early childhood special educator works with families and is involved in the transition of the child with special needs to the primary grades.

No major modifications have occurred in the program since implementation, except as program contracts for licensure have had to change to comply with different Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) requirements.

The program largely serves students with strong backgrounds in working with young children, and most participate in the program part time so that they can continue to work with children and families. Also, many are pursuing their master's degrees in addition to this endorsement. For example, in 2000-01, 12 students were completing this licensure program, seven of whom were also completing the coursework for their master's degree in Education. To date, 26 students completed the requirements for this endorsement; of those, 18 also completed master's degrees.

In addition to meeting course requirements for TSPC licensure and master's degrees, students in the program complete a professional portfolio documenting how they have met state and national competencies for Early Intervention Specialists. They document meeting these competencies through coursework, field experiences, and work samples. Examples of the portfolios were on display during Western's recent accreditation visit from NCATE, and the visiting team commented on the quality of work by the students. These portfolios are designed to grow with the students as they complete professional development activities in their current and future work.

Another positive outcome of this program is the inclusion of students from other licensure programs in the core courses. For instance, students working on their Master's in Education: Early Childhood Education or licensure in Special Educator and Teacher Preparation Deafness also take one or more of the program's core classes to broaden their perspectives and better prepare them for transitioning students.

All students graduating from this program are currently working in their field.

M.S., MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING, OSU/PSU

In July 1994, the Board authorized Oregon State University and Portland State University to offer a joint instructional program leading to the master of engineering degree in Manufacturing Engineering. This program was one of the earliest collaborations approved after the Board's 1992 review of "Guidelines for Establishing Joint-Campus Graduate Programs." Start-up funds were provided by the Oregon Joint Graduate Schools of Engineering in response to an identified need related to concerns about U.S. manufacturing competitiveness in the global marketplace.

As originally implemented, students complete 45 credits: 30 to 36 core credits in analysis, applied statistics, manufacturing management, concurrent engineering, and management; and 9 to 15 credits in the student's technical specialty area (e.g., mechanical engineering, industrial engineering, electrical engineering). Each student is required to complete a final oral examination before a three-member faculty committee. Because this program was designed to serve primarily working professionals, all courses in the program were to be available electronically.

Enrollment was originally estimated to be 45 to 60 students per year, with 15 to 20 graduates per year. Due in large part to discontinuation of arrangements with Boeing, enrollment levels have been lower than anticipated. To date, 19 students have graduated from this program. Currently, 15 students are enrolled, split almost evenly between the two participating institutions.

Because the program did not evolve as envisioned, OSU and PSU have had to make a number of modifications to offer the program cost-effectively. The courses are available in multiple modes of delivery - face to face, televised in real time off-campus, and asynchronous video, in addition to some Web-based video streaming. The program has been reorganized to make it more industry responsive and further changes are anticipated. For example, instead of four departments participating, there are now two: the industrial and manufacturing engineering departments of the two universities. Formation of an industry advisory board is under consideration. The program director is addressing recruitment and course scheduling issues.

Resources for the program remain adequate. Both universities bring faculty, library, computer equipment, and laboratory facilities to the program. OCATE manages the budget and oversees the delivery of televised courses. No grant funds have been generated as a result of this program.

The majority of students in this program are employed (e.g., Hewlett-Packard, Boeing, Wacker, and several other high-tech companies) and have returned to school to enhance their credentials for internal promotion opportunities or to protect themselves against downsizing. A few students changed jobs following completion of this degree program and believe that the graduate-level degree was an important factor in being able to quickly find another job.

This pioneering program is at a watershed stage. The small enrollment seems out of balance with the complexities of organizing and sustaining an interinstitutional program. If current strategies to increase enrollments in the joint program are not successful, it may be timely to consider other streamlined organizational alternatives.

(No Board action required)

STATUS OF THE WESTERN UNDERGRADUATE EXCHANGE PROGRAM

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

This is the annual report on Oregon's experience with the Western Undergraduate Exchange Program (WUE), established by the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) in 1988. Over time, the number of states participating at some level has grown to include 14 of the 15 WICHE states. In 1989, the Oregon State Board of Higher Education approved entry of Oregon University System (OUS) institutions in the WUE program.

The goals of WUE are to increase student access and choice while enhancing the efficient use of educational resources among the western states. The basic assumptions underlying WUE are (1) that most institutions have some programs that can accommodate additional students at little or no additional cost, and (2) that additional nonresident students can be attracted to those programs by offering a tuition discount.

The Board guidelines for OUS participation in WUE provide that:

It is WICHE policy that nonresident WUE students pay 150 percent of resident tuition if they apply and are admitted to one of the designated WUE programs. WUE tuition is substantially less than nonresident tuition at institutions in all participating states.

Since its inception, total WUE enrollment in all participating states has grown to nearly 13,000 students. Last year (2000-01), 993 Oregon residents participated in the WUE program, and Oregon institutions received 1,129 WUE students. This is the second year that Oregon experienced a net gain (i.e., more WUE students coming to Oregon than leaving the state). However, OUS institutions have exercised restraint on increasing WUE students, since limited state funds are reserved for per WUE student FTE support. It is interesting to note that 55 of Oregon's outgoing students attended two-year institutions.

Each state determines its level of participation and sets limits, if any, on numbers of students received. Each state also determines which programs are available and any conditions.

Idaho and Nevada receive the most students (265 and 264 respectively in 2000-01) from Oregon. Other states receiving significant numbers of Oregon residents are Montana (160) and Colorado (78). Overall, Nevada receives the most WUE students (1989) from all participating states; California receives the least (21) and permits only one of its institutions, the California Maritime Academy, to receive WUE students.

(No Board action required)

Table 1
Students from WUE States Enrolled at Oregon Institutions: A Ten Year Perspective

Institution

1991-92

1992-93

1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

EOU

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

OIT

33

55

58

67

70

55

54

102

90

79

OSU

21

34

46

79

112

180

265

329

385

333

PSU

4

3

2

5

6

7

8

19

45

123

SOU

14

36

37

34

66

87

174

253

389

360

UO

16

28

52

84

56

63

43

20

56

86

WOU

0

0

0

2

3

3

32

60

78

148

Total

88

156

195

271

313

395

576

783

1,043

1,129

% Change

42%

77%

25%

39%

15%

26%

46%

36%

33%

8%

Table 2
Oregon Students Enrolled at Institutions in WUE States: A Ten Year Perspective

State

1991-92

1992-93

1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

Alaska

15

13

27

25

34

14

13

12

21

23

Arizona

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

13

California

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

2

4

Colorado

13

17

28

39

50

55

57

63

66

78

Hawaii

3

1

3

6

4

11

21

31

51

47

Idaho

352

285

305

327

288

226

223

298

286

265

Minnesota

15

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Montana

131

247

269

215

140

114

87

101

106

106

Nevada

0

13

62

73

135

163

201

185

211

264

New Mexico

2

4

6

5

4

4

2

4

1

2

North Dakota

18

19

16

37

34

29

33

37

58

61

South Dakota

8

8

12

12

17

19

21

26

16

16

Utah

6

17

20

32

31

34

46

48

46

34

Washington

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

21

47

60

Wyoming

5

11

17

13

27

20

24

39

34

20

Total

568

635

765

784

764

689

730

867

950

993

% Change

97%

12%

20%

25%

-3%

-10%

6%

19%

10%

4%