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OAR 580-010-0035, RESIDENCE CLASSIFICATION OF ARMED FORCES PERSONNEL (TEMPORARY RULE)

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

The 71st Legislative Assembly passed, and the Governor recently signed, HB 2177, which expands the definition of Armed Forces personnel eligible for consideration as Oregon residents for tuition purposes at Oregon University System institutions. This proposed administrative rule amendment would modify the Board's current residency policy to be consistent with Oregon law. Because of the need to bring the Board's rule into conformity by July 1, 2001, the proposed amendment is recommended as a temporary rule. Permanent rulemaking procedures will be undertaken so that a permanent rule will be in place prior to the expiration of the temporary rule.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends the Board amend OAR 580-010-0035, Residence Classification of Armed Forces Personnel, as a temporary rule, as follows (new language is in bold text, deleted language is bracketed):

Residence Classification of Armed Forces Personnel

580-010-0035 (1) For purposes of this rule, members of the armed forces [services] means officers and enlisted personnel of:

(a) the [United States] Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard of the United States;

(b) reserve components of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard of the United States;

(c) the National Guard of the United States and the Oregon National Guard.

(2) Notwithstanding OAR 580-010-0030, members of the armed forces [services] and their spouses and dependent children shall be considered residents for purposes of the instructional fee if the members: [who] reside in this state while assigned to duty at any base, station, shore establishment or other facility in this state[,];[or while] reside in this state while serving as members of the crew of a ship that has an Oregon port of shore establishment as its home port or permanent station[,]; or [shall be considered residents for purposes of the instruction fee] reside in a foreign country and file Oregon state income taxes no later than 12 months before leaving active duty.

(3) An Oregon resident entering the armed [services] forces retains Oregon residence classification until it is voluntarily relinquished.

(4) An Oregon resident who has been in the armed [services] forces and assigned on duty outside of Oregon, including a person who establishes residency under section (2)(c) of this rule, must return to Oregon within 60 days after completing service to retain classification as an Oregon resident.

(5) A person who continues to reside in Oregon after separation from the armed [services] forces may count the time spent in the state while in the armed [services] forces to support a claim for classification as an Oregon resident.

(6) The dependent child and spouse of a person who is a resident under section (2) of this rule shall be considered an Oregon resident. "Dependent child" includes any child of a member of the armed forces who:

(a) Is under 18 years of age and not married, otherwise emancipated or self-supporting; or

(b) Is under 2[4]3 years of age, unmarried, enrolled in a full-time course of study in an institution of higher learning and dependent on the member for over one-half of his/her support.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

M.M., INTERMEDIA MUSIC TECHNOLOGY, UO

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

The University of Oregon proposes to offer the Master of Music degree in Intermedia Music Technology, effective immediately. The proposed program will balance the development of artistic and creative skills with the mastery of the technical aspects of the discipline. This program is unique in its focus on music allied with art, theater, dance, television, and philosophy. There are no similar graduate degree programs in the state.

Students will be required to complete 55 graduate credits. Thirty-nine credits will be in core music courses such as Post-tonal Theory, Advanced Electronic Composition, Music in the 20th Century, and a nine-credit terminal creative project. The remaining 16 credits will be drawn from related areas, with courses such as the Concepts of Television Production, Dance Aesthetics, Cinematic Representations, Principals of Design in the Theater, and Topics in the Philosophy of Art. Students will complete three demonstrations of proficiency: (1) a juried demonstration where the student shows mastery of specific software, (2) a four-hour written examination on theoretical aspects of music technology, and (3) a proctored essay written during a four-hour period regarding artistic and aesthetic issues relating to music technology and other arts, which will be read by three faculty members. Because the discipline is highly technological, faculty will employ software such as Electronic Music Interactive, an Internet-deliverable, multimedia document containing motion animations, sound, and glossary where the student can engage the content of electronic music interactively.

During the past couple of years, the UO School of Music has received numerous inquiries regarding a master's program focusing on computer and music technology. Most of these inquiries have expressed interest in the way music technology relates to other arts (e.g., video, dance, Internet). In addition, UO's multimedia undergraduate program will likely generate more interest in the proposed master's. This field is growing rapidly, with employment options in a variety of areas such as computer generation, film scoring, and Web design. Just this month, a large communications firm in Eugene announced plans to expand into film production. UO anticipates eight students enrolled in the program at any given time.

One faculty member in particular, Dr. Jeffrey Stolet, is central to this program. He holds an endowed chair in the School of Music. His Ph.D. is in music theory and he is a composer with national and international performances and extensive experience in collaborations involving music technology and dance, theater, film, video, and computer animation. Other tenured music faculty will teach in the program as well as faculty in the related fields. The research resources of the Knight Library and the Douglass Listening Room will adequately support the program. In addition, the studio and performance spaces currently housed in the School of Music are sufficient for the program. No additional resources are needed to support this program.

All appropriate University committees and the OUS Academic Council have positively reviewed the proposed program. An external review team, with members from Stanford University, San Jose State University, and the founder and conductor of Sound Traffic Control, provided a report on the proposed program. They found that "[t]here is ample room for such a program given the rapid pace of innovation and need for trained and artistically experienced practitioners." They believe that the program will be especially rich because it is surrounded by established programs in jazz, classical, world music, etc. in the UO's School of Music. The team found faculty, facility, and equipment resources to be sufficient for the program. They admit that intermedia programs are a recent national phenomenon; however, there is a shortage in skilled intermedia professionals. Therefore, it is their opinion that this program is well justified. The structure of it compares favorably with other programs in respected institutions (e.g., University of Washington, Dartmouth, San Jose State University, Simon Fraser).

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Board authorize the University of Oregon to establish a program leading to the Master of Music degree in Intermedia Music Technology. The program would be effective immediately, and the OUS Office of Academic Affairs would conduct a follow-up review in the 2006-07 academic year.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE, BOTANY, SOU

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Southern Oregon University proposes to offer an undergraduate certificate program in Botany, effective fall 2001. No other OUS institution offers a similar certificate program. OSU does offer several related undergraduate and graduate degrees in botany, botany and plant pathology, and plant physiology. Currently, SOU students planning careers in botany or graduates working in the field and seeking career advancement must simply bundle together upper-division courses offered at Southern. The proposed certificate would provide a coherent body of knowledge, awarding a certificate that recognizes their concentrated study in the field of botany.

Students completing this certificate will have been given a rigorous curriculum in the botanical sciences that includes the most current perspectives and research results. Post-baccalaureate students seeking career advancement within governmental agencies or entry-level botany positions generally need a minimum of 36 quarter hours in botanical sciences; this program would meet that requirement. The program consists of 37 upper-division credits - 24 core botany credits, 3 to 4 interdisciplinary credits (e.g., conservation biology), 7 to 8 credits in a specialized area of focus, and 3 to 4 credits of senior capstone or postbacclaureate project. The program will include courses that train students in the latest molecular biotechnology, which will be facilitated by the new Molecular Biotechnology Core Facility currently under development within the School of Sciences, and by the electron microscopy facility. All courses necessary for this program are currently in place.

Students will be prepared to enter into agricultural research, the pharmaceuticals industry, biotechnology, or science education. Resource management agencies and private consulting firms in Oregon require the expertise of botanists to perform vegetation surveys, rare species inventories, and a variety of tasks associated with completion of environmental impact statements and assessments. In recent years, with implementation of the Northwest Forest Plan, the scarcity of qualified botanists to design and carry out survey-and-management requirements of the plan has impeded a full and timely implementation of resource management policy. As Oregon continues to develop an ecosystem management approach to stewarding natural resources, the proposal certificate program will help recruit and train scientists needed to meet the demand.

Southern anticipates serving 14 to 20 students per year, with 6 to 12 graduates per year. No new faculty, staff, library, or facility resources are needed for this program. The SOU Department of Biology houses an internationally recognized herbarium, which contains about 14,000 specimens of vascular plants and cryptogams, with a primary emphasis on plants of the Klamath ecoregion and the California/Oregon border region in general. In addition to specimens in the herbarium, SOU has an extensive set of specimens designated for use in teaching upper-division botany courses. The SOU Greenhouse provides space for experiments requiring controlled growth environment.

The proposed program has been positively reviewed by the appropriate institutional committees and Academic Council.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Southern Oregon University to establish a program leading to the undergraduate certificate in Botany, effective fall 2001. The OUS Office of Academic Affairs would conduct a follow-up review in the 2006-07 academic year.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE, NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES, SOU

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Southern Oregon University proposes to offer an undergraduate certificate program in Native American Studies, effective fall 2001. No other OUS institution offers a similar program. In 1992, SOU developed a minor in Native American Studies. Related activities at Southern include, among other things, the Konaway Nika Tillicum (the Native American Youth Summer Academy); a large and active Native American Student Union; and an archaeological field school, conducted jointly by Oregon tribes and SOU's Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

The proposed program will utilize coursework from anthropology, history, and English, in addition to Native American Studies, to form an interdisciplinary foundation of knowledge. This 36-credit certificate consists of 12 core credits, 16 to 20 credits in Native knowledge and perspectives, and a 4 to 8 credit practicum. In the core courses, students will learn about the indigenous peoples of North America through the use of oral tradition in culture, history, art, music, and literature. In addition, history will be presented from the perspective of the Native Americans. Four new courses will be developed for this certificate. The program will be made available to full- and part-time students, and courses may be offered on evenings and weekends to accommodate the needs of working professionals.

There is significant student and faculty interest in such a certificate program being offered by Southern Oregon University. U.S. Census Bureau data (August 20, 2000) indicate increases in American Indian and Alaska Native populations from April 1990 to July 1999, and southern Oregon has experienced a 22 percent increase in Native populations. It is important that their cultural heritage be taught and understood as we continue to increase our multicultural awareness. Students who have graduated with the Native American Studies minor have secured professional positions with tribes and agencies dealing with indigenous people. Other professional opportunities have been found in multicultural settings such as classrooms, social service agencies, or governmental agencies. Federal agencies such as the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service increasingly expect university graduates to have multicultural sensitivity and experiences working in cross-cultural settings. This certificate program would help prepare students to meet those expectations.

SOU anticipates serving 22 to 24 students per year in this program. Resource needs are minimal. The library requires $1,800 per year for the purchase of monographic materials, journal subscriptions, and videos. This need would be met through internal institutional reallocation. All other personnel and facility requirements are in place.

The program has been positively reviewed by the appropriate institutional committees and the Academic Council.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Southern Oregon University to establish a program leading to the undergraduate certificate in Native American Studies, effective fall 2001. The OUS Office of Academic Affairs would conduct a follow-up review in the 2006-07 academic year.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

GOVERNMENT-TO-GOVERNMENT EDUCATION CLUSTER

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

OUS Director of Diversity Planning and Special Projects Yvette Webber-Davis will highlight recent activities related to the initiative. She will be joined by several tribal representatives from the Education Cluster, who will offer their perspectives on the program.

Government-to-Government Overview

Oregon's Government-to-Government initiative, established by Governor Kitzhaber in 1996 through Executive Order 96-30, provides for collaboration among state agencies and Oregon's nine federally-recognized tribes (Burns-Paiute; Coos, Lower Umpqua & Siuslaw; Coquille; Cow Creek; Grand Ronde; Klamath; Siletz; Umatilla; and Warm Springs) to address the needs of American Indians. The Government-to-Government initiative addresses issues through a "cluster" model in the areas of education, economic development & community services, natural resources, cultural resources, health & human services, and public safety & regulation. State agencies involved in the administration of activities relating to these areas designate key contacts to work with the tribes in the appropriate cluster.

Senate Bill 770, relating to Government-to-Government relations between the State of Oregon and American Indian tribes in Oregon, was introduced to the 2001 Oregon Legislative Assembly. The bill requires state agencies to develop and implement a policy that:

a) identifies individuals in the state agency who are responsible for developing and implementing programs of the state agency that affect tribes;

b) establishes a process to identify the programs of the state agency that affect tribes;

c) promotes communication between the state agency and tribes; and

d) promotes positive government-to-government relations between the state and tribes.

This legislation was signed by Governor Kitzhaber on May 24, 2001.

The Education Cluster

The Government-to-Government Education Cluster is a consortium composed of representatives from the Governor's Office, the Oregon University System (OUS), the Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development, the Oregon Department of Education, and tribal education officers. With an emphasis on lifelong learning, tribal representatives work to enhance educational awareness and opportunities among tribal members. Also, the tribes seek to facilitate opportunities for educators and administrators throughout K-16 to enhance awareness and educational efforts concerning tribal cultures and needs.

The Government-to-Government process and opportunities to work with the Education Cluster have been valuable for the tribes and for the OUS in terms of understanding tribal needs and facilitating communication with tribal entities. These opportunities have aided OUS representatives in further enhancing initiatives that encourage access and retention among American Indians. Also, OUS institutions continue to establish effective outreach and educational programs that benefit Oregon's tribes.

(No Board action required)