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UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION POLICY FOR THE 2001-02 ACADEMIC YEAR

Background

It is Board policy to approve undergraduate admission requirements for each academic year in February of the preceding calendar year. This schedule is necessary for institutional planning, program implementation, publications, and timely notice to prospective students.

Admission Policy Update

Beginning with the admission policy adopted by the Board for 1996-97, the Oregon University System (OUS) projected a transition from the traditional grade- and subject-based admission standards to a proficiency-based admission standards system (PASS). A projected schedule for this policy transition begins on page 15 of the full admission document in the supplemental section of the docket.

Admission Policy Changes for 2001-02

Admission policy, as currently approved by the Board for the 2000-01 academic year, will continue without change for admission to the 2001-02 academic year. However, projected transition to the proficiency-based admission system has been revised to reflect and accommodate the implementation of educational reform in Oregon's schools. Support for the development of PASS continues to be borne by a combination of external grants and state general funds.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends (1) that the 2000-01 general admission policy be continued for the 2001-02 academic year; and (2) that staff continue to work with Oregon schools, OUS campuses, and the Oregon Department of Education on the transition from the traditional admission policy to the proficiency-based admission standards system (PASS).

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

Undergraduate Admission Requirements: 2001-02 Academic Year

 

EOU

OIT

OSU

PSU

SOU

UO

WOU

FRESHMAN ADMISSION
(Residents and Nonresidents)
High School Graduation

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

High School Grade Point
Average (HSGPA)

3.00*

2.50

3.00

2.50

2.75

3.00

2.75

Subject Requirements - 14 Units
(4-English, 3-Math, 2-Science,
3-Social Studies, 2-Second
Language)



Yes



Yes



Yes



Yes



Yes



Yes



Yes

SAT I / ACT Scores**

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

TRANSFER ADMISSION
GPA of Residents

2.00

2.00

2.25

2.00

2.25

2.25

2.00

GPA of Nonresidents

2.00

2.00

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.50

2.00

Admission Consideration for Applicants with 2.00+ GPA
and AA Degree from Oregon
Community Colleges



N/A



N/A



Yes



N/A



Yes



Yes



N/A

Minimum College Hours Required

24

24

36

30

36

36

24

All Applicants Must Meet Specified Course Requirements



Yes***



Yes***



Yes***



Yes***



Yes***



Yes***



Yes***


* In courses taken to satisfy the subject requirements. Students below the 3.00 HSGPA must submit a portfolio with specified, additional documentation.

** Minimum SAT I scores are not set, but score results must be submitted and may be used for alternative or selective admission.

*** Courses Required: OSU, UO - one writing course beginning with WR 121; college algebra or above, or the equivalent of Math 105. All institutions - two years of same high school-level second language, or two terms of a college-level second language, or acceptable performance on approved assessment options. American Sign Language (ASL) meets the second language requirement. Second language requirement applies to transfer students graduating from high school in 1997 and thereafter.

AUTHORIZATION TO AWARD HONORARY DOCTORATES, OSU & UO

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Oregon State University requests authorization to award honorary doctorates to Julian Bond and Gordon W. Gilkey and the University of Oregon requests authorization to award an honorary doctorate to Marian Wright Edelman. Pending agreements with nominees, the awards will be made at the June 2000 Commencement ceremonies.*

Oregon State University

Julian Bond

For more than three decades, Julian Bond has been a household name associated with civil rights, economic justice, and peace in the United States. Bond's long involvement in civil rights began in 1960 when, as a 20 year old, he helped create the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and led a sit-in movement intended to desegregate Atlanta lunch counters. He later served as communications director for that group.

In 1965, Bond won a seat in the Georgia state legislature, but his involvement in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee--and the SNCC's opposition to the Vietnam War--prompted the legislature to refuse to admit him. Voters in the district twice reelected Bond, but each time, the legislature barred him. Finally, in December 1966, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the exclusion unconstitutional and Bond was sworn in a month later. He served in the Georgia House of Representatives from 1967 to 1975, and in the Georgia Senate from 1975 to 1987. In addition to his legislative activities, Bond has served as president of the Southern Poverty Law Center and as regional president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in Atlanta.

At the landmark 1968 Democratic National Convention, he became the youngest person--and the first African-American--to have his name placed in nomination for the vice presidential candidacy of a major U.S. political party. He withdrew his name from consideration because he was younger than the Constitutional minimum age.

At the conclusion of his 21-year political career, Bond pursued a legal practice in Washington, D.C., and became active in broadcasting. He hosted a widely syndicated television show called "America's Black Forum" and became involved in a number of public television and radio documentaries, including "The Shadow of Hate," which was nominated for an Academy Award.

In 1997, Bond came to Oregon State University and spoke to students in OSU's University Honors College, to local K-12 students, and to a spellbound public audience in Corvallis.

Julian Bond is currently chairman of the board of the national NAACP. He holds 19 honorary degrees and is a Distinguished Professor at the American University in Washington, D.C., and a professor of history at the University of Virginia.

Gordon W. Gilkey

Gordon W. Gilkey has spent more than 70 years teaching, preserving, promoting, and creating art, and his multifaceted career has touched people all over the world.

He began teaching art in 1930, as a student teacher at Albany College. From 1937-39, he was the official etcher at the New York World's Fair. He joined the art faculty of Stephens College in 1939, where he remained for three years until World War II interrupted his academic career.

While serving in the military, Gilkey wrote to President Franklin Roosevelt, asking that a unit be established to review military tactics --especially bombing plans--to minimize damage to significant art and architecture in Europe. That unit was established, with Gilkey as a member, and in the final days of the war he and his "art detectives" tracked down and repatriated literally thousands of pieces of art that had been looted. For his efforts, he was knighted by France and given similar honors by Italy, Germany, and Sweden. The United States awarded him the Meritorious Service Medal.

Following the war, Gilkey came to Oregon State College in Corvallis to head its art department. He built the program from a tiny group of three faculty members to one of the largest, most noted art departments in the Northwest. After 15 years as department chair, he became the first dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences (now the College of Liberal Arts), a move which helped transform OSC into Oregon State University.

At the same time, Gilkey was active in the state and national art scenes. He was instrumental in establishing the Oregon Arts Commission and was the prime mover in events that led to the formation of the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

He continued to produce his own art and today is represented in most of the major museums in the United States, and many abroad, including the Metropolitan Museum, The Library of Congress, The Smithsonian, Bibliotheque Nationale (Paris), The British Museum, Staatsgalerie (Stuttgart), and the National Academy of Fine Arts (China).

After 30 years at Oregon State, he was forced to retire because of state-mandated age limits. That hardly has slowed him. He amassed a world-class collection of art prints--many given to him by grateful European countries--that, in 1976, totaled 8,000 works valued at $12 million. That collection became the core of the Vivian and Gordon Gilkey Center for Graphic Arts at the Portland Art Museum, which now numbers more than 25,000 pieces. Gilkey serves as curator.

Still active as a printmaker, Gilkey has staged more than 60 exhibitions of his own work and has branched into experimentation with computer-generated polymer printing plates. He teaches printmaking at the Pacific Northwest College of Art, where, at 87 years of age, he is printmaker-in-residence.

Gilkey recently was recognized again by the French government, this time for his role in establishing a French-American school in Portland. He remains a world-recognized figure in art, education, and history.

University of Oregon

Marian Wright Edelman

For her entire professional career, Marian Wright Edelman has been an advocate for disadvantaged Americans. A graduate of Spelman College and Yale Law School, she was the first African-American woman admitted to the Mississippi Bar. She directed the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund office in Jackson, Mississippi. In 1968, she moved to Washington, D.C., as counsel for the Poor People's March that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., began organizing before his death. She founded the Washington Research Project, a public-interest law firm and the parent body of the Children's Defense Fund (CDF). For two years, she served as the director of the Center for Law and Education at Harvard University and, in 1973, she founded CDF.

Under Edelman's leadership as president and founder, CDF has become a strong national voice for children and families. CDF's mission is to educate the nation about the needs of children and encourage preventive investment in children before they become ill, drop out of school, suffer too-early pregnancy or family breakdown, or get into trouble.

Edelman has authored five books and has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the Albert Schweitzer Humanitarian Prize and the Heinz Award, as well as being a MacArthur Foundation Prize Fellow.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends the Committee refer the nominations to the Board for authorization to Oregon State University to award honorary doctorates to Julian Bond and Gordon W. Gilkey and to the University of Oregon to award an honorary doctorate to Marian Wright Edelman at their June 2000 Commencement ceremonies.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

* The Board of Higher Education permits institutions, with the concurrence of their faculties, to award honorary degrees. Each institution wishing to award honorary degrees must adopt criteria and procedures for selection that will ensure the award honors distinguished achievement and outstanding contributions to the institution, state, or society. Criteria and procedures for selection must be forwarded to the Chancellor or designee for approval and, when approved, filed with the Secretary of the Board. Institutions are required to forward their recommendations for honorary degrees for the Board's approval 90 days before the award date.

RESOLUTION REGARDING CLASSIFIED INFORMATION FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, OSU

Staff Report to the System Strategic Planning Committee

The Industrial Security Manual issued by the U.S. Department of Defense requires that owners, officers, and executive personnel of corporations and regents or trustees of colleges and universities, whose employees have access to classified material in the course of working on Department of Defense contracts, delegate to others the authority for fulfilling the requirements of the Industrial Security Manual and exclude themselves from access to classified information.

The resolution recommended for adoption is that which is required by the Manual and is, except for changes in the date and names of Board members, identical to that which has been previously adopted by the Board.

Staff Recommendation to the Committee

Staff recommends that the Committee refer the resolution to the Board for adoption regarding access to classified information related to the Department of Defense material.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

RESOLUTION

That those persons occupying the following positions for Oregon State University shall be known as the Managerial Group as described in the Industrial Security Manual for Safeguarding Classified Information:

President
Vice Provost for Research and International Programs
Vice President for Finance and Administration
Security Supervisor
Assistant Security Supervisor

That the chief executive and the members of the Managerial Group have been processed or will be processed for a personnel clearance for access to classified information, to the level of the facility clearance granted to this institution as provided for in the aforementioned Industrial Security Manual.

That the said Managerial Group is hereby delegated all of the Board's duties and responsibilities pertaining to the protection of classified information under classified contracts of the Department of Defense or User Agencies of its Industrial Security Program awarded to Oregon State University.

That the following named officers and members of the Oregon State Board of Higher Education shall not require, shall not have, and can be effectively excluded from access to all classified information in the possession of Oregon State University and do not occupy positions that would enable them to affect adversely the policies and practices of Oregon State University in the performance of classified contracts for the Department of Defense or User Agencies for its Industrial Security Program awarded to Oregon State University.

Officers and Board Members

Name
; Title

Tom Imeson; President
Don VanLuvanee; Vice President
Herbert Aschkenasy; Board Member
Shawn Hempel; Board Member
David Koch; Board Member
Leslie Lehmann; Board Member
James Lussier; Board Member
Geraldine Richmond; Board Member
William H. Williams; Board Member
Jim Willis; Board Member
Phyllis Wustenberg; Board Member
Joseph W. Cox; Chancellor
Diane Vines; Board Secretary

APPOINTMENT TO THE FOREST RESEARCH LABORATORY ADVISORY
COMMITTEE, OSU

Summary

ORS 526.225 specifies that the Board of Higher Education shall appoint a Forest Research Laboratory Advisory Committee composed of 15 members, nine of whom are to be individuals engaged, actively and principally, in timber management of forest lands, harvesting, or processing of forest products; three individuals who are the heads of state and federal public forestry agencies; and three individuals from the public-at-large. Although the statute does not prescribe the terms of the Committee members, the practice has been to make appointments for a period of three years. Traditionally, those who are performing actively and effectively have been recommended for reappointment to a second three-year term, with all members replaced at the conclusion of a second term.

Dr. Bart A. Thielges, interim director of the Forest Research Laboratory, with the concurrence of President Paul Risser, has made the following recommendation:

Appointment of Mr. Harv Forsgren, regional forester for the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, to replace Robert W. Williams, who has retired. Mr. Forsgren is a 21-year career Forest Service employee. He began as a volunteer in Wyoming in 1975 and joined the agency permanently in 1978 as a botanist at the Chugach National Forest in Alaska. He has worked as a fisheries biologist in Idaho at the Sawtooth National Recreation Area, the Sawtooth National Forest, and at the Mt. Hood National Forest in Oregon. He became fisheries program leader in the Intermountain Region in 1988, and then served as the national fisheries program leader in Washington, D.C. In 1998, Mr. Forsgren was named national director for the Wildlife, Fish, and Rare Plants staff. He has held key leadership roles in the development of major conservation plans for anadromous fisheries in the Pacific Northwest and has received national recognition for his work in the management of riparian areas.

Staff Recommendation to the System Strategic Planning Committee

Staff recommends that the Committee forward the nomination to the Board for final approval of the above appointment to the Forest Research Laboratory Advisory Committee.

COMMITTEE ACTION:

BOARD ACTION:

CENTER FOR APPLIED JAPANESE LANGUAGE PROJECT UPDATE

Background

The Chancellor's Office launched the OUS Japanese Language Project in 1994 with a three-year, $500,000 grant from a Japanese philanthropic foundation to create a model of standards-based education. This goal has been realized. Other languages have followed the Japanese model in developing standards and assessments consistent with CIM and PASS requirements. Additional, diversified outside funding has been secured to help Japanese teachers implement the pedagogic and curricular changes implied by the new standards. In recognition of the Project's need for long-term research and development in standards-based second language education, the Japanese Language Project moved to the University of Oregon campus under the new name of the Center for Applied Japanese Language Studies (CAJLS).

Update

CAJLS has helped make Oregon a national model of K-16 cooperation and standards-based education in the foreign language field. Its work has influenced other disciplines within Oregon and in the second language teaching community nationwide. The Center has dispatched speakers to 12 states in the past year to disseminate the Oregon Model. Key aspects of this model include:

Specific accomplishments in the last year include:

The key to success has been a close alliance of K-12 and postsecondary faculty. OUS provided the leadership, but practicing teachers have created the nuts and bolts of this model of standards-based education. Relying almost exclusively on outside funds, which it continues to attract, CAJLS has demonstrated that K-16 cooperation is not just a lofty ideal, but an effective way of doing business.

THE CLASSES BETWEEN 1988 AND 1993: FIVE TO TEN YEARS AFTER GRADUATION

Summary

The seven public four-year universities composing OUS awarded more than 45,000 bachelor's degrees between 1988-87 and 1992-93. What are the longer-term effects of completing a bachelor's degree on the subsequent lives of graduates? A telephone interview of more than 3,500 alumni randomly selected from each of the institutions, conducted in spring 1999 by Gilmore Research Group for OUS, provided some insights.

A Profile of Respondents

College Experiences

1. On average, these respondents spent 3.8 years at their graduating institution.

2. More than half (57 percent) transferred into one of the seven OUS institutions (46 percent transferred from an Oregon community college, 21 percent transferred from another OUS campus, 22 percent transferred from an out-of-state public or private four-year institution, and three percent transferred from an Oregon private four-year institution).

3. Almost nine in ten said they worked as an undergraduate (summers, during the academic year), and one-third said they worked 25 hours or more a week. More than one in five said they interrupted their studies to earn money to finance their education.

4. Eighty-six percent said internship opportunities were available as part of their academic programs and 65 percent said they actually completed an internship.

Satisfaction with Education Received

1. More than seven in ten rated the education they received at the OUS institution from which they earned a degree as "very good" and higher, and 85 percent said they would "select the same institution again."

2. Almost nine in ten OUS graduates said their current job utilized their college preparation. The respondents believed that college helped develop capacities needed in the workplace, including problem-solving and critical thinking skills (94 percent), oral and written communication skills (92 percent), creative thinking (91 percent), and working in teams and with diversity (83 percent).

3. Of those who rated the experience positively, 50 percent noted the quality of education received (e.g., well-known, national reputation, good professors, good programs and classes, hands-on involvement), 30 percent mentioned the location of the campus (e.g., close to home, urban, small- town atmosphere, beautiful area), 25 percent cited the overall, positive experience, 22 percent noted the social environment (e.g., diversity, extracurricular activities), 27 percent identified other factors (e.g., school size, helped personal growth, family tradition), and eight percent talked about affordability.1 For the 15 percent who were indifferent or responded negatively, two-thirds wanted a different program and one-third would have preferred a different institution.

Employment and Socioeconomic Achievement

1. Nearly 90 percent were employed (full- and part-time).

2. Seven in ten took jobs in Oregon. More than eight in ten education graduates found work in Oregon compared to 71 percent of social science graduates and 62 percent of engineering and computer science graduates.

3. The median personal income was nearly $40,000, although discipline differences appeared similar to salary differences for recent bachelor's graduates reported elsewhere. The median personal income for education graduates at $31,667 compared to social science graduates at $35,833, and engineering and computer science graduates at $56,040. The higher incomes of graduates five to ten years out could be explained by salary differentials attributed to work experience plus a bachelor's degree or completing an advanced degree.

4. The top three sectors of employment included private industry (48 percent), education (22 percent), and local, state, or federal government (12 percent).

5. Two major occupational groups accounted for two-thirds of the jobs held by respondents (52 percent in professional specialty and 16 percent in executive, administrative, and managerial jobs).

6. One in five said they used at least one language other than English on the job. Of these, three- fourths used Spanish in the workplace.

7. One-third had completed an advanced degree subsequent to completing a bachelor's degree. Of these, 51 percent completed a second degree at an OUS university compared to 18 percent at an out-of-state public university, 16 percent at an out-of-state private university, and 12 percent at an Oregon private university.

8. Top discipline choices for an advanced degree included education (31 percent), business (13 percent), social sciences (10 percent), health professions (10 percent), humanities, fine arts, and foreign languages (8 percent), engineering or computer and information science (7 percent), and law (7 percent).

9. Of the professional development providers available to them, learning opportunities provided by universities were identified by twice as many respondents (60 percent) than either professional associations (37 percent) or their employers at the work site (32 percent).

10. About six in ten said they are "involved in community activities."

1. Because respondents provided multiple responses in some questions, the total exceeds 100 percent for these.

UPDATE ON THE PROFICIENCY-BASED ADMISSION STANDARDS SYSTEM (PASS)

Background

The Proficiency-based Admission Standards System (PASS) was established by the Board of Higher Education in July 1993, in response to an agreement between the Board of Higher Education and the Board of Education. The purpose of the agreement was to clarify and define the relationship between the Certificates of Initial and Advanced Mastery (CIM and CAM) and college admission. Without such clarification, the two education systems would tend, over time, to be organized around different measures of learning--K-12 around standards and higher education around grades and Carnegie units (seat time). The goal of PASS was to create a means for admitting students based on demonstrated proficiency, thereby allowing students to move continuously through the education system based on their performance.

PASS Proficiency Standards Developed

During the fall of 1993, PASS involved high school teachers and higher education faculty in the process of developing the necessary proficiencies, the results of which were presented to the Board in January 1994. After additional input and review from OUS faculty and administrators and public school educators, the Board, at its May 1994 meeting, endorsed the proficiencies as the basis for admission to OUS institutions for in-state public school students applying fall term 1999. Subsequent revisions of the PASS proficiency standards and the development of criteria for assessment have involved literally hundreds of OUS faculty, community college faculty, and high school teachers.

Phased Implementation Timeline Established for CIM and PASS

In 1995, the Oregon Legislature passed HB 2991, which aligned CIM requirements very closely with the proficiencies already developed by PASS. This bill also moved back implementation of the CIM to the 1998-99 school year. The State Board of Education decided to phase CIM implementation, beginning with requirements in math and English for 1998-99, then adding science in 1999-00 and social sciences in 2000-01. The arts and second languages were required in 2001-02 and 2002-03 respectively, but were established as areas where each school district could set its own required level of student performance.

Given this change in the implementation timeline for CIM, PASS also modified its implementation schedule, adopting a phased implementation to begin in 2001 and continue through 2005, two years after each CIM requirement was put into place. This adaptation was reviewed by the Board of Higher Education at its February 1996 meeting. This policy was further refined and procedures for out-of-state applicants clarified in materials presented at the February 1997 Board meeting. Additional timeline adjustments by the State Board of Education in 1999 delayed the implementation of the social science requirement for the CIM until 2003, moving PASS implementation to 2005. However, the current policy for PASS remains that students have the option of using PASS proficiencies to meet certain subject-area requirements in fall 2001 and are expected to present evidence of proficiency for admission beginning fall 2005. This extended period of transition is designed to allow high schools to adapt gradually to the use of proficiencies and to minimize the impact on their ongoing operations by allowing them to extend training and curricular redesign over a multi-year period. OUS continues to work closely with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to remain aligned as adjustments are made in CIM implementation.

Standards and Assessments for CIM and PASS Aligned

A major milestone was achieved in the 1998-99 school year when PASS and ODE agreed upon a set of aligned content standards that extend from grade 3 through college admission. Oregon is the first and only state in the nation to have aligned its standards in this fashion. This means that as students work toward meeting the benchmarks set at grades 3, 5, and 8, along with the requirements for the Certificate of Initial Mastery, they will be able to see how their efforts relate to university admission requirements. In most cases, as students reach higher levels of performance on ODE standards, they meet or are close to meeting PASS proficiency requirements.

As reported to the Board in February 1999, PASS continues to work with ODE to develop the means to translate state multiple-choice assessment scores so that they can be used to demonstrate proficiency in specified areas. Work continues to determine how best to use results from state writing assessments and math problem-solving tasks. The goal is to create a fully aligned assessment system that guarantees students who achieve the CIM, and eventually the CAM, will be able to use the data from those assessments to meet most PASS proficiency requirements.

Current Status

1. Expand Capacity of Schools to Implement PASS

PASS continues to work with Oregon high schools to identify realistic student performance standards and to teach teachers how to score student classroom work using proficiency criteria developed by PASS. As reported to the Board in February 1999, a three-year $1.45 million grant was awarded to OUS from The Pew Charitable Trusts in September 1998. This was matched by OUS and ODE contributions that allowed PASS to expand its efforts to 55 Oregon public high schools. More than 110 math and English teachers agreed to use PASS proficiencies in their classes and to assess 30 to 60 of their students for PASS. Approximately 5,000 collections of student work were assessed for PASS during the 1998-99 school year, yielding specific information on proficient performance levels in math and English.

In September 1999, the PASS partnership high schools were increased to 65. These high schools, located in 46 school districts, enroll 63,089 students--approximately one half of the high school students in the state. Also included in this partnership with PASS is an Eastern Oregon consortium coordinated by Eastern Oregon University faculty representing small as well as rural schools. Over 180 English, math, and science teachers are aligning curriculum to focus on PASS proficiency standards and collecting evidence of proficient performance during the 1999-00 school year. These teachers are meeting four times during the year to cross-score student work and to determine with greater specificity what constitutes proficient performance in each of the PASS proficiencies in English, math, and science. In addition, a professional development program was created by PASS, called "Teachers Teaching Teachers." This program enables the 180 designated PASS teachers to involve the English, math, and science departments in PASS activities at their high schools. Results are being evaluated to determine the extent to which this training program expands the capacity of over half the high schools in Oregon to implement PASS in their English, math, and science departments.

2. Guidelines for Teaching and Assessing PASS Proficiencies Published

Using information gained from the assessment of collections of student work over the last three years by PASS teachers, the "Guidelines for Teaching and Assessing PASS Proficiencies" were published for English, math, and science and distributed to all PASS partnership high schools. In addition to verification by the classroom teacher, PASS proficiency may be determined by scores the student receives on state and national assessments. With the assistance of all OUS admission officers, the newly published PASS guidelines contain a section on national standardized measures (SAT, SAT II, ACT, and IB) as well as state tests (Oregon Writing Assessment, etc.) that may be used to verify specific proficiencies. Throughout the 1999-00 school year, PASS will be working with teachers, admission officers, and the ODE Assessment Division to ensure that the assessment levels have been set appropriately so that adjustments may be made where necessary for the 2000-01 school year.

3. PASS Becomes Institutionalized within OUS

As the fall 2001 implementation of the PASS option draws near, it is the goal of PASS to transition from a research and development project to an integrated part of the OUS admission process. To this end, the OUS Office of Enrollment Services and High School Relations, along with admission officers from all OUS campuses, conducted counselor forums in 11 locations around the state for 102 public and private high schools and over 250 counselors, administrators, and registrars. Participants received an update on the current status of PASS, collected reference materials outlining the core elements of PASS, and gave input on the implementation of PASS in the admission process.

In addition, PASS staff are working with OUS admission officers to establish processes and procedures for the period when PASS is optional (fall 2001 through 2004) to the period when PASS is the preferred method of admission (fall 2005). This effort includes investigating options for electronic transfer of data from high schools to individual OUS campus offices; piloting transfer of PASS data with Eugene school district high schools during the 1999-00 school year; working with high schools throughout the state on aligning the course-approval process with PASS proficiencies; and investigating incentives available for students demonstrating PASS proficiencies.

In addition to OUS officers, faculty on all campuses are vital to the institutionalization of PASS. Implications Teams were established on each campus. Composed of arts and sciences faculty, these teams examine implications of PASS for undergraduate coursework; align placement tests with PASS proficiency assessment data; and orient and update staff on PASS developments. Most importantly, OUS faculty are directly involved in the setting of performance levels for PASS through their campus Implications Teams. Calibration sessions are being held on all OUS campuses in 1999-00. These sessions allow faculty to verify judgements of PASS teachers on collections of student work in English, math, and science; set levels above proficient for exemplary work (worthy of recognition); and align performance of students entering with PASS proficiencies with performance of students in current undergraduate coursework.

Finally, work with out-of-state institutions is critical to the full implementation of PASS. OUS continues to collaborate with other states throughout the nation that are investigating or developing various forms of proficiency-based admissions. PASS continues to have a professional relationship with The College Board and other national organizations involved in the development of assessments common to institutions of higher education across the country. PASS continues to be the model for proficiency-based admission, as reflected in the interest shown by other states. In May of this year, PASS is sponsoring a meeting for admission officers from throughout the nation, but primarily from American Association of Universities (AAU)-level institutions. The goal is to continue to ensure that PASS is supported by such institutions and that Oregon students with PASS proficiencies can apply without difficulty anywhere in the nation. A number of universities and university systems have provided written assurances that PASS proficiencies are entirely acceptable for admission purposes, and that they support the development work being done by PASS. These letters are available for viewing on the PASS website: http://pass-ous.uoregon.edu.

UPDATE: THE 1999 HIGH SCHOOL VISITATION PROGRAM

Background

For many years, the Oregon University System (OUS) has conducted a coordinated, high visibility program that sends teams of admission representatives from each of the campuses into the majority of Oregon's high schools. The coordinated program is complementary to the extensive efforts made by all OUS institutions individually to market their programs and build their undergraduate enrollments. Purposes of the coordinated program include: encouraging students to plan for educational experiences beyond high school, advising students about how to successfully apply for admission and pay for college, and promoting Oregon public universities as high quality choices.

The annual fall visitation program begins in September after the high schools have started the fall term. Two eight-person teams are on the road at the same time. Each team comprises a representative from one of the seven campuses and a team leader. The team leader is a senior admission or student affairs professional whose role is to confirm the times and locations of the visits with the schools, once on-site to make a general presentation to an assembly of students on the value of a higher education and OUS options, assist the OUS campus representatives in their break-out presentation sessions, and drive the van.

The OUS Office of Enrollment Services and High School Relations has primary responsibility for the scheduling of the visitation program, arrangements for team members, and the reserving and continuous stocking of the vans. Enrollment Services designs and produces an annual viewbook, a publication given to high school students and high school counselors that describes the admission requirements and opportunities at OUS institutions. Counselors also receive a comprehensive handbook prior to the opening of school each fall. Finally, Enrollment Services conducts an evaluation of the visitation program as a basis for making improvements the next year.

Visitation Format

The typical visit to a high school begins with the team leader's presentation and slide show at a large assembly of interested students and their advisors. Following the general presentation, the students choose two campus presentations conducted in separate rooms. Each campus representative provides students with information on academic programs, scholarships, student life opportunities, and campus facilities in an effort to begin or further enhance the recruitment of the prospective applicant. Following the presentations, many visits provide a brief, open time where students can meet with any of the campus representatives. The visit ends with a meeting between the high school counselors and the team members to discuss campus-specific questions. The typical day on the road will include visits to at least two locations.

Results of 1999 Fall Visitation

Program Improvement

All aspects of the program were evaluated, as appropriate, by participants: team leaders and team members, high school counselors, students, and campus admission directors. There is consensus on several recommendations for improvement: