SOU MISSION STATEMENT

Staff Report to the Board

The Board has general powers to assign missions and roles for the institutions under its jurisdiction. The Oregon Revised Statute states that:

...the State Board of Higher Education, for each institution, division and department under its control, shall: supervise the general course of instruction therein, and the research, extension, educational and other activities thereof. [ORS 351.070(2)(a)]

SOU has been involved in campus-wide planning that included a review of the mission previously approved by the Board. The proposed mission and vision statement follows:

Southern Oregon University's primary mission is to provide a full range of excellent and thorough instruction in the liberal arts and sciences complemented by selected professional and graduate programs. The campus combines many of the best features of both the private and public college: small-enrollment classes; teachers who know and work directly with their students; and a faculty and staff fully committed to education, both in and beyond the classroom, on and off campus. Southern Oregon University is designated as a center of excellence in the fine and performing arts.

The University principally serves students from Southern Oregon, but increasingly attracts them from the West and Northwest. It brings students of all ages together in traditional undergraduate programs, education for the professions, graduate education, and lifelong-learning programs. Through the University's core curriculum, students share in a common intellectual enterprise, mastering specific information and applying critical-thinking skills they have learned in the community and international settings. Students are encouraged to engage in significant undergraduate research. They also become technologically literate, learn to communicate clearly and effectively, and explore ethical issues and define social and personal values.

Six elements are central to this mission:

1. A supportive and responsive faculty and staff committed to student learning, undergraduate research, community service, and teaching informed by scholarship;

2. A rigorous curriculum and co-curricular activities that will prepare students to lead constructive and civically responsible lives, be successful in a global society, and continue to learn throughout their lifetimes;

3. Diversity of students, faculty, and staff;

4. A natural and cultural environment that enhances the University's programs and provides a greater variety of opportunities for its students;

5. A commitment to service, distance learning, and to full and appropriate partnerships with the community and region; and

6. An attractive, well-equipped, and secure campus.

Board Discussion (May 16, 1997)

President Aschkenasy stated that he would like, as much as possible, to separate the presentation of items from the decision about the items. He indicated that he has discussed postponing Board action regarding the SOU mission statement with Dr. Reno. In addition, he noted that the proposed mission statement differs from that presented in the Board docket; the first line was deleted. Chancellor Cox indicated that the Board seeks greater focus to achieve greater differentiation among the institutions.

President Aschkenasy asked what SOU does that would attract nonregional students. President Reno responded that there are many attractions. Sometimes it's a specific program such as theater or environmental sciences. Beyond programs, there are a cluster of characteristics (e.g., strong student-faculty interactions, practica and internships, amenities of Ashland).

Ms. Christopher noted that diversity is part of the mission and asked what progress SOU has made in this arena and projected next steps. Dr. Reno responded that it's in the mission statement because it is an important value at SOU. However, he admitted that SOU needs to continue to make progress in this area. Some programs to address diversity include a summer academy program for talented and gifted young people in grades five through eight. Another effort is a week-long program for Native American children, the goal of which is to bring the students to campus and help shape their educational aspirations. "If the success rate in that program, which is targeted to that minority group, tracks with the success of our academic program over the last 15 years, that's a very good investment of effort," stated Dr. Reno.

In addition, President Reno explained that SOU has developed a series of grant proposals for external funding to help establish relationships with historically African American institutions and other institutions with large minority populations that would lead to faculty and staff exchanges. SOU is examining a partnership relationship with the University of California at Santa Barbara, which has a very good program in Native American studies. "We have a minor in Native American studies and already we're talking about having our students regularly visit UCSB with an idea of looking toward graduate study while, at the same time, trying to get UCSB faculty and graduate students to spend time (a term or a year) on our campus to teach and encourage students," said Dr. Reno. He listed several other efforts to increase and sustain diversity on the SOU campus.

(No Board action required)

Staff Recommendation to the Board (July 18, 1997)

President Steve Reno presented the SOU mission to the Board at the May meeting. The Board postponed action on the mission pending further study of all of the campus mission statements. It is important for SOU to have final Board approval of its mission to enable use of it for an accreditation review in the fall.

Staff recommends that the Board adopt the mission statement for Southern Oregon University.

BOARD ACTION:

B.S. IN APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY, OIT

Introduction

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) requests authorization to offer the B.S. in Applied Psychology. This proposed program will (1) produce graduates with the necessary levels of social and communication skills required by a variety of social service agencies, (2) provide educational opportunities for placebound students wanting to pursue an applied social science curriculum related to current employment opportunities or in preparation for graduate programs in the field, (3) provide bachelor's-level training for working in social service settings with mandated clients such as criminal substance abusers, and (4) serve as a minor field of study in health psychology for students training for health-related occupations. All other OSSHE institutions offer programs in psychology; the proposed program differs, however, in its applied emphasis, course structure, and nature of practicum experiences available. Current resources at OIT are sufficient to begin implementing this program in the first year. In succeeding years, additional resources will be required. Due to the immediacy of student enrollment needs, expressed student interest in the availability of a major in this field, and regional need, no preproposal was presented to the Board.

Staff Analysis

1. Relationship to Mission

The historical mission of OIT has been to prepare individuals in applied technology fields. While the term "technology" is most commonly used in the context of the physical/biological sciences and engineering, it may also refer to practical applications in other fields, such as health care and psychology. This proposed program will focus on applications of psychological research and the social sciences for improving health, understanding human relations in the business world, and addressing substance abuse and other social problems.

OIT's mission (approved in February 1992) further states that one objective is "to develop ... the ethical and cultural awareness required to meet the changing needs of individuals and societies." OIT has developed clearly defined outcomes in line with these objectives. Specifically, students in this proposed program will develop the:

Finally, while this program does expand OIT's mission in a modest way, it is justified both in terms of its importance in serving the needs of the community and state, and in its capacity to strengthen existing health sciences programs offered by the institution.

2. Evidence of Need

The need for this proposed program is evident by identifying community and institutional needs as well as employment opportunities for graduates.

Community & Institutional Needs

Access. Placebound students in the Klamath Basin have very limited curricular choices for programs at the baccalaureate-degree level. Psychology, nationwide, is the second largest major by student enrollment. This program would expand the academic options for local students.

OIT seeks to accommodate a diverse population of students in this program, hence evening courses will be an important feature. In addition, a newly established advisory center will provide services to part-time students, evening students, and others who require special scheduling and course-delivery options.

Retention. A poll of current students suggests that current general studies students would be retained through the bachelor's degree level were this proposed program to be implemented. It is estimated that perhaps as many as 50 or 60 students would remain at OIT rather than transferring to another college or leaving higher education altogether.

Strengthening existing programs. This proposed program would provide a minor and additional elective courses for students in management and in the allied health programs.

Employment Opportunities

This proposed program will provide training relevant to current employment opportunities, both in the Klamath Basin and across the state. According to the on-line version of the 1996-97 Occupational Outlook Handbook, "A bachelor's degree in psychology qualifies a person to assist psychologists and other professionals in community mental health centers, vocational rehabilitation offices, and correctional programs." Bureau of Labor statistics (1996) indicate that three career fields suitable for applied psychology graduates rank within the top 20 fastest-growing occupations: residential counselors (9th), human service workers (10th), and correctional officers (18th). Nationally, the need for correctional officers is expected to increase much faster than average, a trend that is particularly relevant for Oregon due to Measure 11. The state is expecting its prison population to more than double by the year 2006, with corresponding prison staff growth. Graduates of OIT's applied psychology program will be trained to work with both treatment providers and the criminal justice system. Starting salaries for these positions typically range from $24,000 to $30,000.

OIT has received widespread external encouragement to develop this proposed program, particularly for the plans to train individuals to work with court-mandated clients. Both the director of the Oregon Department of Corrections and the department head of Klamath and Lake Community Corrections indicate that this program would help meet future personnel needs.

The National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors also supports the program, stating that there is an "urgent need" for such graduates. The Klamath branch of Services to Children and Families indicates positive employment opportunities as well, adding that they would be interested in participating as an externship site.

Students in the health psychology emphasis area will be prepared for careers in clinical support services and health-related counseling. The courses in this emphasis area support the allied health curriculum or may serve as a minor. The director of the Center for Medical Research, Merle West Medical Center, supports this proposed program.

The solid theoretical foundation, coupled with the field-based practica and externships, will equip program graduates with the skills necessary to find employment in an array of social service areas.

3. Quality of the Proposed Program

The proposed program will be of high quality, as evidenced by the quality of the curriculum and faculty.

Curriculum. The program permits students to select one of three emphasis areas for more in-depth study: human services, health psychology, or organizational development. While all will share a common core of classes (e.g., Community Psychology, Psychological Research Methods, Human Growth and Development), the specific emphasis areas will allow students to focus their learning. Students with a human services emphasis, for example, will take classes such as Psychology of Addiction, Behavior Modification, Criminology, and Therapeutic Communities. The health psychology curriculum will include such courses as Social Psychology of Health Care, while organizational development students will study Industrial Psychology, Organizational Behavior, and Statistical Methods.

Planning discussions are underway with both SOU and WOU for delivery of selected courses, thereby utilizing strengths of other OSSHE institutions. Potential courses include Group Counseling, Interviewing and Appraisal, Human Services, and Principles and Methods of Psychological Assessment.

OIT's program in applied psychology will use both practica and externships for experiential learning. (OIT defines practica as courses taught during the junior year in which students work with an agency as part of the course with a duration of two days to two months. Students in externships work off campus with a duration of two weeks to one year. In externships, the host organization supervises and financially supports the student's work at the organization.) Sites are currently being developed for these experiences.

The proposed curriculum is strong enough to support student movement either into employment directly after graduation or into a related field of graduate study, such as counseling, social work, or psychology.

Faculty. Within the existing department, faculty members have sufficient expertise and appropriate credentials to begin implementation of the program in fall 1997. One professor has been involved in approximately $4 million worth of field research dealing with social problems and has worked closely with social service and criminal justice system agencies. Another faculty member is chair of the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences and has a great deal of relevant teaching and professional experience. OIT also has a cadre of qualified adjunct faculty prepared to teach in the proposed program.

4. Adequacy of Resources to Offer the Program

While some new resources will be needed to support this program, internal reallocation, the potential for federal grant monies, and funding generated through anticipated increased enrollment will, in part, address the program resource issues.

Faculty. Two FTE faculty would be anticipated for the upper division courses. No new faculty would be required for the first two years of the program. There are many qualified adjunct faculty available locally; $5,000 would be needed for adjunct salaries, to be covered by existing funds administered by the provost.

The extent to which courses are delivered from other OSSHE campuses will have a direct impact on the use of adjunct professors and on hiring the anticipated one or two additional full-time faculty members. Since there is currently a student waiting list for this program, enrollments may be large enough to support the additional faculty needed.

Library, Facilities, and Equipment. The OIT library currently subscribes to a number of psychology review journals that are adequate for lower division courses in psychology. More specialized material is required for upper division courses. Immediate upgrade costs for texts, monographs, and new journal subscriptions are estimated at less than $2,000 for 1998-99. New videotapes, films, and other support materials are estimated at approximately $3,000 for 1998-99 and about $750 per year thereafter. Additional consideration will be given to increasing access to reference sources via on-line computer facilities, especially Internet sources. New reference materials for this program will also be a priority for the library academic program budget.

No additional facilities are needed to implement the program. The availability of a dedicated PicTel/Socrates classroom for videotelephone conferencing and course delivery, in addition to an ED-NET satellite transmission and receiving studio, permits distance delivery of courses. As distance learning modes become more prevalent, additional equipment support for videotelephone capacity and Internet systems may be needed.

Program Review

The proposed program has been reviewed positively by all appropriate institutional committees and the Academic Council.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Oregon Institute of Technology to establish a program leading to the B.S. in Applied Psychology effective fall term 1997, with a follow-up review of the program to be conducted by the State System Office of Academic Affairs in the 2002-03 academic year.

BOARD ACTION:

NATIONAL ZEBRAFISH STOCK CENTER, UO

Executive Summary

The University of Oregon is seeking Board approval to construct a 10,000-gross-square- foot facility, to serve as the National Zebrafish Stock Center, located at the UO Riverfront Research Park adjacent to the campus. If approved, the Board would authorize the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration to seek authorization from the State Emergency Board for an "Other Funds" limitation for the issuance of $1.5 million of 15-year term Article XI-F(1) bonds on behalf of the UO. This project would enable the University, already the U.S. leader in genetic research using zebrafish, to become the sole central resource of extensive stock lines of zebrafish for researchers throughout the United States.

Bonding debt service would be paid from indirect cost recovery from federal grants in support of the project. Operating funds for the Center would come from a combination of indirect cost recovery from the National Zebrafish Stock Center federal grant, sales of fish stocks, and, potentially, from extramural funds provided by the National Institutes of Health and other federal agencies and philanthropic institutions. In addition, if the University were unable to secure follow-on grants or other extramural revenues after the first five-year period, it has pledged monies from its Indirect Cost Recovery (ICC) budget sufficient to cover the bonding debt service and annual operating costs.

The University will host a site visit from the National Institutes of Health in August, followed by the anticipated confirmation of grant award in September. Should the grant not be awarded as expected, the University would not proceed with this capital project.

Staff Report to the Board

Scientific progress in the understanding of vertebrate development has increased several-fold in the past few years, largely based on work from a few model genetic organisms, including the zebrafish, a tiny tropical freshwater fish. Insights gained from work on embryonic zebrafish have implications for the study of human development. As a result, the international research demand for this organism is increasing rapidly.

The UO is a national and international leader in genetic research using zebrafish and has developed an outstanding reputation for breeding stock fish at its existing smaller facilities. Recently, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) approached the University about creating a National Zebrafish Stock Center that would serve as a central repository on genetic research using the organism. The Center would reproduce and sell live fish, as well as genetic material developed from the stocks to laboratories throughout the world. The Center would also develop methods for improving the health of zebrafish stocks. The Center would house 500 genetically different lines of live fish, with the potential to expand.

Responding to an appeal from other researchers, and urged on by The National Institutes of Health, the University requests approval to construct a 10,000-gross-square-foot $1.5 million facility at the Riverfront Research Park, in conformance with the Research Park master plan. The facility would consist of a series of water tanks resting on a concrete foundation within a concrete structure with an outer facade built of wood or concrete. A shipping/receiving area, chemical storage, testing labs, and a few small offices would be housed in the facility. Extensive ventilation requirements would be required. Direct access to primary transit routes via Franklin Boulevard would be maintained.

Site development costs would include underground utilities; however, the street line to the main campus infrastructure is immediately adjacent, lowering the cost of development at the site.

Existing uses at the site include two small buildings from the 1940s (Quonset huts), which would be demolished. Zebrafish research housed in these would be removed to other zebrafish facilities at the University during construction. Certain other administrative functions housed there presently would also be moved to other locations on campus during this period.

Construction funds in the amount of $1,500,000 would be provided from the proceeds of the sale of 15-year Article XI-F (1) bonds. Repayment of the bonds would be via indirect cost recovery from a long-term (five-year) grant now being considered by The National Institutes of Health. The University expects to receive notification regarding NIH's decision to award the grant in September. If the grant is not awarded, the University will not proceed with this capital project.

UO officials have committed to dedicating the indirect cost revenues of $245,000/year from this five-year grant to cover the expected debt service for the project, estimated at $160,000/year. As with other national research support facilities, UO expects to secure follow-on grants in the succeeding two five-year periods of the period of the bond for at least the same amounts.

In the event the University were unable to secure subsequent grants either from the NIH after the first five-year period or from other extramural sources, the University would adapt the facility for other research purposes. It would also commit sufficient monies to cover both bonding debt service requirements and operating costs (estimated at a total annual average cost of $820,000) from its annual Indirect Cost Recovery (ICC) budget. Since the ICC budget has been between $8 million and $9 million the past several years, this pledge represents approximately nine to ten percent of the ICC budget. Table 1 shows the growth in federal research grants and other grant awards at the UO over the past 12 years.

Construction of the facility would begin in 1998 and the facility would become operational in 1999.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends that the Board approve the request to construct a 10,000-gross-square-foot facility to serve as the National Zebrafish Stock Center at the UO Riverfront Research Park. Staff further recommends that the Board authorize the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration to seek authorization from the State Emergency Board for an "Other Funds" limitation for issuance of Article XI-F(1) Bonds in the amount of $1,500,000.

Table 1

University of Oregon

Multi-year Summary of Grants, Contracts and Awards Received

Fiscal
Year

Total
Received
Federal Awards
Received
1984-85 $23,788,940 $20,540,812
1985-86 $24,335,347 $21,423,814
1986-87 $24,753,897 $21,129,421
1987-88 $32,001,971 $26,404,350
1988-89 $36,144,268 $29,725,452
1989-90 $34,691,675 $30,035,647
1990-91 $38,454,502 $32,624,458
1991-92 $41,439,740 $34,233,730
1992-93 $46,439,911 $37,935,710
1993-94 $43,084,988 $33,600,910
1994-95 $49,314,114 $40,578,922
1995-96 $46,193,068 $38,223,508


BOARD ACTION:

RIVERFRONT RESEARCH PARK, UO

Staff Report to the Board

At the June 1997 meeting, the Board heard a presentation and update on the Riverfront Research Park, a public/private partnership on the University of Oregon campus. Before development of a new 47,000-square-foot building, located at 1800 Millrace Drive in Eugene, begins this summer, the Board must approve: (1) a subdivision of the property, dedicating right-of-way and easements associated with the construction of Millrace Drive and creating six tax lots; and (2) the ground lease, which is in substantially the same form as the ground lease for development of the first building at 1600 Millrace Drive, which was approved by the UO Assistant to the President for Legal Affairs and the Attorney General's office before the Board approved it in 1992. The proposed lease has been reviewed by legal counsel.

Subdivision and New Building

The new building is being developed by R.B. Booth, L.L.C., in cooperation with Campbell Commercial Real Estate, and is being designed by WBGS Architects. The flexible, multi-tenant building is 47,000 gross square feet; and the building and associated parking will be located on two separate tax lots, encompassing approximately four acres east of the first building. Construction is scheduled to commence in early fall, with occupancy in the spring of 1998. As a condition of development, 10.38 acres of the property must be subdivided, including dedicating right-of-way and easements associated with the construction of Millrace Drive (a public street to serve the site) and creating six tax lots.

Legal Agreement with Developer

A long-term ground lease has been drafted between the Board and R.B. Booth, L.L.C, the developer (Lessee). Terms and conditions of the ground lease are summarized below:

Term: Fifty years, with possibility of four 12-year renewals. Property and improvements revert to the Board upon expiration.

Rent: Rent is phased in over the first eight years with three percent annual increases thereafter.

Covenants: Tenants must engage in research and/or development or author ideas, inventions, services, or products that complement the research and educational activities of the UO. Research, development, or production that destroys or injures human life and the design, development, production, or deployment of offensive or defensive weapons are prohibited.

Design Review: All phases of design are reviewed by a University-appointed Design Advisory Committee.

Construction/Repair: Lessee is obligated to construct, repair, and maintain the building and site in accordance with strict standards.

Performance/Insurance: Lessee is required to provide a contractor's completion bond, in addition to fire, extended coverage, general liability, boilers, and rental income insurance and to maintain the site free from liens. Lease provisions protect the Board from Lessee's performance failures after construction is complete.

Assignment, Sublease, Sale: Lease provisions provide guarantees of the Board's approval of assignments and subleases and protection of the Board's position in the event of sale.

The developer and its lender currently are reviewing the ground lease, and they have raised no major issues with the terms and conditions; however, there is a possibility prior to final approval that they may request some modification of the language or terms.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends the Board approve the Riverfront Research Park subdivision, a subdivision of the 10.38-acre property, dedicating right-of-way and easements associated with the construction of Millrace Drive and the creation of six tax lots. Staff also recommends the Board agree to enter into the ground lease to allow development of the next building in the Riverfront Research Park. If negotiations are not concluded by the Board's July 18 meeting, staff recommends the Board delegate authority to the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration to approve minor changes prior to signature by the Board President and Secretary.

BOARD ACTION:

ADOPTION OF BUILDING FEE PROJECT PROCESS ADMINISTRATIVE RULE

Executive Summary

Last summer, student representatives expressed a desire that students be assured of the opportunity to participate and to provide input regarding the projects to be undertaken with revenues collected from the student building fee. Campus officials and student representatives met to develop a required process, similar to that used in developing incidental fee recommendations, that guaranteed student input and participation rather than providing for full campus discretion as is now allowed.

Staff Report to the Board

The proposed rules provide a process that guarantees student participation and input regarding projects undertaken with revenues from the student building fee. The rules authorize the recognized student government on each campus to identify a student campus planning and construction committee, as part of the established campus planning process, to review proposed projects, and to recommend to student government officials whether a project should be recommended and if so, its funding priority. Incidental Fee Committees will review projects that will use incidental fees to fund operating costs. Student government officials will make recommendations to institution presidents and, where there is disagreement, attempt to reach consensus or submit the matter to a hearing board as provided in the Board's incidental fee process.

If the hearing process does not result in agreement, the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration will notify the Board and make a recommendation on criteria established in the rule.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends the Board adopt Administrative Rules, OAR 580-010-0100 through -0140, as follows.

(NOTE: Italicized material indicates new language.)

Building Fee Project Process

Student Planning and Construction Committee

580-010-0100 (1) Each student government shall establish a student campus planning and construction committee. Each institution shall incorporate the campus planning and construction committee into the established campus planning process for projects proposed to be funded, in whole or in part, from income from the student building fee.

(2) For projects proposed to be funded, in whole or in part, from income from the student building fee, the student planning and construction committee shall recommend to the appropriate official(s) of the student government, as described in OAR 580-010-0120, whether each such project should be approved and the relative priority of each such project. The committee may also request consideration of additional projects or project modifications that the committee or student member(s) identifies independently.

(3) If a project affects a facility in which operations are or will be funded, in whole or in part, from student incidental fee income, the committee will seek the recommendation of the institution's incidental fee committee before making its recommendation to the appropriate student government official(s).

Incidental Fee Committee Review and Recommendation

580-010-0110 Each institution's Incidental Fee Committee will be given reasonable

opportunity, to be specified in the guidelines and procedures of the student government, to review any project that affects a facility whose operations are or are intended to be funded, in whole or in part, from student incidental fee income. The Incidental Fee Committee shall recommend to the student planning and construction committee whether it believes the project should be approved and estimate, based upon the project's scope and schedule, the anticipated effect that the operation of the completed project will have on incidental fee amounts charged to students.

Recommendations of Appropriate Student Government Official(s)

580-010-0120 The student government of each institution shall determine which of its elected officials will be charged with making recommendations to the institution's president regarding capital construction projects proposed to be funded, in whole or in part, from student building fee income and shall so notify the institution president. Such appropriate student government official(s) shall review the recommendations of the incidental fee and student planning and construction committees. Efforts shall be made by both the appropriate student government official(s) and the representatives of the college and university administration to reach common understanding and consensus on such recommendations. However, the appropriate student government official(s) may make recommendations to the institution president even if such consensus has not been reached.

Agreement between Student Government and Institution President

580-010-0130 (1) The institution president shall review the recommendation of the appropriate student government official(s) prior to approving the institution's capital construction budget request for the upcoming biennium. If the institution president does not agree with a recommendation or priority ranking of the appropriate student government official(s), the president and the appropriate student government official(s) shall make good faith efforts to reach agreement.

(2) If agreement is not reached, the institution president and the appropriate student government official(s) shall submit the matter to a Hearings Board in the manner described in OAR 580-010-0090(3)(h). The hearing must be completed prior to the deadline for the president to submit the institution's request to the Chancellor's Office.

(3) If agreement has not been reached even after a hearing, the institution's president shall submit the institution's capital construction budget request to the Chancellor's Office and disclose that agreement has not been reached with the appropriate student government official(s).

Capital Construction Budget Recommendations of Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration

580-010-0140 (1) The Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration or designee shall discuss with the parties any matters of disagreement between the institution president and the appropriate student government official(s) and shall take the information provided into account in making the Chancellor's capital construction budget recommendations regarding projects to be financed from the building fee to the Board of Higher Education. If the Chancellor's recommendation includes projects on which the institution and appropriate student government official(s) have not reached agreement, the Chancellor's Office shall disclose that a disagreement exists to the Board of Higher Education at the time of its capital construction budget recommendation.

(2) The Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration shall base these

recommendations on the following criteria:

(a) Demonstrated project need and beneficial use to students;

(b) Campus student support for the project;

(c) Protection of asset investment and compliance with code requirements;

(d) Co-funding availability; and

(e) The historical share of building fee projects at a given campus compared to the

System as a whole.

(3) The Vice Chancellor, within a reasonable time of receiving a request, shall provide a written report that specifies how criteria listed in subsection (2) of this rule were considered in the evaluation of a project.

BOARD ACTION: (Roll call vote required)

REFUNDING BOND SALE

Staff Report to the Board

The State Board of Higher Education has an opportunity to achieve significant debt savings by refunding certain outstanding series of bonds. This will require the issuance of refunding bonds. Authorization for the sale is granted by Oregon Revised Statutes 286.051 and 288.605 through 288.695, inclusive.

Certain portions of the bonds proposed for refunding are the responsibility of Oregon Health Sciences University. OHSU management has agreed to participate in this refunding and pay the pro rata share of costs. OSSHE's portion of the cash flow and present value savings net of selling expenses are projected to be approximately $2.5 million and $1.4 million respectively. Maturity lengths will remain unchanged or be shortened. Under no circumstances will maturities be extended.

Board action to approve the following bond resolution is required before the State Treasurer can arrange for, and proceed with, the sale.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends the Board adopt the following bond resolution authorizing the issuance of refunding bonds.

RESOLUTION

WHEREAS, ORS 286.031 states, in part, that the State Treasurer shall issue all general obligation bonds of this state after consultation with the state agency responsible for administering the bond proceeds; and

WHEREAS, ORS 286.033 states, in part, that the state agency shall authorize issuance of bonds subject to ORS 286.031 by resolution; and

WHEREAS, ORS Chapters 351, 288 and 286 provide further direction as to how bonds are sold and proceeds administered; and

WHEREAS, ORS 286.051 authorizes the issuance of refunding bonds and ORS 288.605 et. seq. authorizes the issuance of advance refunding bonds by the State Treasurer upon finding that certain requirements and conditions have been met; and

WHEREAS, it appears advantageous to this Board to sell refunding bonds to refund certain outstanding bonds thereby benefitting the state;

NOW, THEREFORE, be it resolved by the State Board of Higher Education of the State of Oregon as follows:

Section 1. Issue. The State of Oregon is authorized to issue general obligation bonds (the "Bonds") in such series and principal amounts as the State Treasurer, after consultation with the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration of the Department of Higher Education, shall determine are required to refund all or any portion of its General Obligation Building Bonds, 1992 Series C; 1994 Series A; and any other series of bonds that meet the requirements established by law and approved by the State Treasurer.

Section 2. Maintenance of Tax-Exempt Status. The Board covenants for the benefit of the owners of the Bonds to comply with all provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"), that are required for Bond interest to be excluded from gross income for federal income taxation purposes (except for taxes on corporations), unless the Board obtains an opinion of nationally recognized bond counsel that such compliance is not required in order for the interest to be paid on the Bonds to be so excluded. The Board makes the following specific covenants with respect to the Code:

(a) The Board shall not take or omit any action if the taking or omission would cause the Bonds to become "arbitrage bonds" under Section 148 of the Code and shall assist in calculations necessary to determine amounts, if any, to allow the State to pay to the United States all "rebates" on "gross proceeds" of the Bonds that are required under Section 148 of the Code.

(b) Covenants of the Board or its designee in its tax certification for the Bonds shall be enforceable to the same extent as if contained herein.

Section 3. Sale of Bonds. The State Treasurer, with the concurrence of the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration, shall sell the Bonds as the State Treasurer deems advantageous.

Section 4. Other Action. The State Treasurer, the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration, or the Controller of the Department of Higher Education is hereby authorized, on behalf of the Board, to take any action that may be required to issue, sell, and deliver the Bonds in accordance with this resolution.

BOARD ACTION:

ACADEMIC YEAR FEE BOOK 1997-98, TUITION & OTHER FEE POLICIES

Staff Report to the Board

The Academic Year Fee Book contains the proposed fees and associated policies relating to all mandatory charges required of students enrolled within the regular, on-campus, academic year programs of the Oregon State System of Higher Education (OSSHE). The Chancellor recommends the Board adopt these fees as submitted. Each fee proposal has been tested against a set of criteria to evaluate the appropriateness of any fee increase. These criteria included:

Is the fee increase within the reasonable bounds of inflation?

Have there been mandatory cost increases imposed on a given fee-supported service, such as that imposed by the change in the minimum wage law?

Is it important to student life to sustain support to a given operation?

Is the function or service sufficiently important to student life or the operation of the institution to warrant the offset of revenue losses caused by declining enrollments?

Has the fee proposal been endorsed by the institution's students, either through its student government, student committee structure, or student referendum?

The staff believes that each proposed fee meets this test and warrants the favorable action of the Board.

Tuition represents the mandatory enrollment fees assessed all students in the regular academic year program of OSSHE institutions. Tuition is comprised of the following separate fees: Instruction, Resource, Building, Incidental, and Health Service fees. It should be noted that certain fee increases may be expected and are consistent with the Board's budget submission and the Governor's and Legislature's recommendations. There has been considerable publicity about the Legislature's action to freeze the instruction fee for resident undergraduate students only. The instruction fee is only one of several components that make up the total tuition. The revenue generated by each element of the tuition is dedicated to a specific purpose, independent of the other components.

The fees submitted in this docket have been described as mandatory. These are the fees set by direct action of the Board. They are distinguished from other fees to which students may be subject. Such fees are set by each institution under the auspices of the Board and the policies that govern the adoption of administrative rules, described in OAR 580-001-0005. These institution fees encompass a wide range of administrative fees including application fees, transcript fees, counseling fees, special course fees, parking fines, gym fees, lab fees, and many others. Each institution must follow strict procedures in setting each of these other fees.

Comparisons of tuition and fee charges among representative Western public institutions, shown in Schedules 1(A), (B), and (C), depict the relationship of annual tuition charges and percentage changes of Oregon institutions versus others in the West.

Instruction Fees: 1997-98 instruction fees for graduate students and for nonresident undergraduate students at all OSSHE institutions are increasing at the same rate of three percent. As a result of 1997 legislative action on the 1997-1999 budget, instruction fees for resident undergraduate students at all institutions are frozen at the 1996-97 rates.

Instruction fees, shown on Schedule 2, generate revenues that apply toward support of the Education and General Services component of the Department of Higher Education expenditure budget. Instruction fees are a part of the biennial budget funding package proposed by the Board and addressed by the Governor and Legislature.

Fees are assessed within undergraduate and graduate fee structures by resident and nonresident student classifications. The residency classification applies to all admitted students. Nonadmitted students enrolling under the part-time student policy are assessed a fee appropriate to the level of the course taken, without regard to residency status.

The full-time instruction fee rate for undergraduates is assessed for all credit hours between 12 and 18. The full-time instruction fee rate for graduates is assessed for all credit hours between 9 and 16. The fees for eight credit hours or less are prorated for the hours enrolled. If students take credit hours above the plateau, they are assessed an additional amount for each hour taken.

Building Fee: Students at all institutions are assessed a fee to finance debt retirement for construction associated with student centers, health centers, and recreational facilities construction through the issuance of Article XI-F(1) bonds. The Legislature, pursuant to ORS 351.170, sets the maximum fee the Board may assess. This rate has been at $18.50 since 1991-92. The Board was initially presented with a proposal to increase this fee in July 1996 with the approval of the 1997-1999 Capital Construction Budget Request. The 1997 Legislature approved the Board's request to authorize an increase in the student building fee up to $25. The actual rate is increasing by 35 percent to $25 per term per student. Part-time students are assessed a pro rata fee.

Incidental Fee: Incidental fee changes are described below for each institution and summarized on Schedule 3. Pursuant to the Board's Administrative Rules, student representatives on each campus develop recommendations to fund programs advantageous to the physical and cultural development of students. The funds generated by this fee are typically used for student union activities, educational, cultural, and student government activities, and athletic activities. The president of each institution reviews the student committee recommendations, following Board procedures to resolve any disagreements. Once satisfied with the proposal, the president submits the recommendation to the Chancellor, who, after a review, submits the proposal to the Board.

Health Service Fee: Recommendations for the health service fee are described for each institution below and summarized in Schedule 3. This fee is used to support the student health services of each institution, which are operated as auxiliary services. Generally, rate increases reflect the institutions' efforts to maintain the self-support nature of these services. Optional health insurance policies are also made available by all institutions, except PSU, which requires students enrolled in nine or more credit hours to purchase, through the health service fee, a limited insurance policy.

Resource Fee: Resource fee changes recommended by the institutions are described below and shown on Schedule 3. Resource fees provide funds for specific programs to assist with faculty salaries, resource materials, equipment, and specialized services. The fees are assessed only to targeted student populations admitted to, or generally understood to be enrolled in, specific programs and are not paid by students in other programs who might incidentally take a course offered by one of these specified programs. However, students enrolled under the part-time student fee policy are subject to the resource fees appropriate to specific courses taken. The technology resource fee is assessed to all students. Resource fees may be proposed by institutions for approval by the Board. The estimated income of all such fees may be no more than five percent of the total Education and General budgeted resources, less institution-specific income.

For those students enrolled through the Minority Achievement Scholarship Program for First-time Freshmen and the Portland Teacher Plan, both of which are Board-approved fee remission programs, resource fees will be covered by the fee remission.

All institutions assess some set of resource fees. Some are increasing rates and/or adding new resource fees. All the dollar amounts are on a per-quarter basis unless otherwise noted. Most fees are prorated for part-time hours.

Total Tuition: The total tuition rates for each institution compared to 1996-97 are summarized on Schedule 4. This is the sum of instruction, building, incidental, health services, and technology/resource fees. In the case of the University of Oregon, the 1997-98 tuition also includes a proposed Recreation/Fitness Center Bond Fee.

There has been much attention given this year to the resident undergraduate instruction fee freeze funded by the 1997 Legislature for the 1997-1999 biennium. It is important to note that the Legislature funded only a freeze of resident undergraduate instruction fees. This did not fund the legislatively approved increase in the building fees, nor the increases in incidental, health services, or resource fees. To demonstrate what the tuition increase would have been had the resident undergraduate instruction fee not been frozen, Schedule 5 compares the 1997-98 tuition with and without a three percent increase to the 1996-97 instruction fee totals.

The following are explanations for each institution-generated fee recommendation. Each of these proposals has been reviewed by the Chancellor's staff. In some cases, institution proposals were returned to the institution for further review and justification. In two cases, the fee proposals were reconsidered by the institution and revised downward. Each of these fee proposals has met the criteria outlined at the beginning of this docket item.

Eastern Oregon University

Eastern Oregon University is increasing its incidental fees by 9.8 percent to $179 per term. This increase is due to three principal factors. (1) The rate paid as honoraria to students working in student government and other leadership capacities had not been increased in several years and was adjusted to more closely match current tuition rates (from $1,975 to $2,316 per year per honorarium for 38 students). Typically, students who receive an honorarium contribute at least 20 hours per week. (2) Student travel per diem rates were increased for the first time in four years to provide adequate rates for student teams and organizations. (Food per diem increased from $13 to $15 per day; lodging per diem increased from $17 to $18 per day.) (3) The increase in the minimum wage rates caused the need to increase incidental fee-funded budgets.

The EOU health service fee is increasing by 1.0 percent to $51 per term. This is only a 50 cent rounding adjustment to allow tuition totals to be stated in whole dollars.

EOU proposes no increases in its technology fee of $50 per term, nor in its one-time matriculation fee of $50 for new students.

Oregon Institute of Technology

Oregon Institute of Technology's incidental fees are increasing 16.2 percent to $115 per term. This fee has not been increased in four years, at the students' insistence to hold the fee constant. That, coupled with recent enrollment declines, has resulted in loss of revenues to support incidental fee-funded activities and services. This 1997-98 increase has been endorsed by the student fee committee to help offset that loss of revenue.

OIT's health service fee is increasing 14.5 percent to $75 per term. This increase is due to the need to offset a loss of revenue from declining enrollment and inflationary increases in operating costs. Since 1994-95, enrollment has decreased by over six percent.

OIT is instituting a technology resource fee this year. The fee will be $24 per term, prorated for part-time students. OIT is the only institution that does not already assess some type of resource fee. The institution will use the fee to support the purchase of computers, software, and network hardware and software that will have direct application by students in their courses and laboratories. It will also increase student connectivity to the Internet. This fee has received the endorsement of OIT's student government. Students represented by the associated student body government will have the opportunity to approve budgets and proposals submitted by the academic departments for the use of these funds, which will cover hardware and software costs only. No administrative or personnel costs will be funded with this fee.

Oregon State University

Oregon State University's incidental fees are increasing by 5.7 percent to $120 per term. The student fee committee, while desiring to hold fee increases to a minimum, saw the need to generate revenue through the incidental fee to help address certain student retention issues. The increase in the minimum wage will increase the cost of student employment for operations dependent on the incidental fee, such as the Recreational Sports Department. A small part of the increase is due to new programs within the educational activities category and a joint program created between the Health Center and the Recreational Sports Department. These programs also received the endorsement of the Undergraduate and Graduate Senates. The third and most significant share of the increase is the need to offset the loss of revenue due to projected enrollment decreases.

The OSU health service fee is increasing 8.7 percent to $75 per term. Due to the relative fixed costs of the health service operations, the projected enrollment decrease has a direct impact on the health service's ability to maintain service levels. The students involved in the student fee process voted to support an increase in the health fee to maintain current services. The health service staff has been decreased through attrition, although student visits to the health center are up by 2.3 percent.

OSU is increasing almost all of its resource fees as follows: MBA residents by 4.0 percent to $130 per term; MBA nonresidents by 3.3 percent to $315 per term; Engineering by 4.0 percent to $130; Pharmacy by 3.1 percent to $1,010 per term for both undergraduates and the PharmD program; and technology fee by 4.0 percent to $52 per term assessed to all students. The one-time matriculation fee of $50 assessed to all new students is unchanged.

Portland State University

Portland State University's incidental fees are declining by 1.5 percent to $100 per term. This decision by the student fee committee is tied to their earlier decision to increase summer session incidental fees significantly. In so doing, they have balanced their fees to align more appropriately revenues generated with services rendered in both the summer session and the academic year.

PSU's health services fee is being held at the 1996-97 rates. Health insurance rates have not increased, and there is currently a sufficient cash balance in the health service fund to allow such a freeze.

PSU proposes no increases in the College of Business Administration master's program fee of $10 per credit hour up to $100; Engineering program fee of $10 per credit hour up to $100; nor in the technology fee of $42 for undergraduates and $45 for graduate students.

Southern Oregon University

Southern Oregon University's incidental fees are increasing by 7.5 percent to $114.50 per term. Each of the activities supported by this fee has strong student endorsement. Support of several activities and services comprise this increase. Of the increase, 3.3 percent is a direct result of the increased minimum wage requirement. Other increases are due to the following items: support for starting a new student radio station; staffing support for a recently expanded infant/toddler program at the Schneider Children's Center; increased support for student government operations by providing student senators $50 per month stipends to encourage more participation and accountability; support for providing an athletics trainer and an assistant women's tennis coach to help the institution comply with Title IX requirements, as well as providing funds to allow cheerleaders to participate at more away games; support for student participation in Model United Nations activities; funds for a content/legal advisor position for the Siskiyou newspaper; support for workshops and programs at the multi-cultural center; and support for the Symphonic Band concert and workshop series to regional high schools.

The SOU health service fee is increasing by 7.5 percent to $64.50 per term. This increase is the result of increased labor costs and a shift of a portion of the counseling services to the health service fund.

SOU proposes no increase in its MBA resource fee of $100 per term for residents, $150 for nonresidents; nor in its technology fee of $24 per term.

University of Oregon

University of Oregon's incidental fees are increasing by 9.9 percent to $147.75 per term. In 1995, the student body voted to endorse a major renovation and expansion of the recreation and fitness facilities. As part of this measure, the students supported an increase in the incidental fee beginning in 1997-98 by $7.75 per term, or 5.8 percent, for recreation center operations. An additional fee for debt retirement, also endorsed at that time, is described in a following paragraph and in a separate issue paper mailed to the Board in advance of the July meeting. At the spring 1997 elections, student incidental fee referenda were also approved to indicate the support for increasing incidental fees by 0.8 percent for support of club sports, the Pocket Playhouse, and Project Saferide. The remaining increase of 3.3 percent is to cover other inflationary costs.

UO's health service fee is increasing by 1.3 percent to $80 per term to finance inflationary increases.

The UO proposes that the College of Business Administration fee of $100 per term for residents and $250 per term for nonresidents remain the same, and that the technology fee of $50 per term for all students remain the same. The Law School is proposing to equalize its resident and nonresident resource fees after a progressive separation for the past several years. The Law School proposes an increase in the Law School resident resource fee of 21.9 percent to $1,950 per semester for residents and a decrease in the per semester fee for nonresidents by 6.0 percent to $1,950.

The UO will be assessing a new Recreation/Fitness Center Bond Fee, shown on Schedule 3, at $15.25 per term. In 1995, the UO student body approved a referendum to recommend this fee to be assessed for 30 years beginning in 1997-98. This fee is proposed as part of a financing package for a major renovation and expansion of the recreation and fitness facilities that also includes the use of building fees and gifts. In the July 1996 presentation to the Board on the 1997-1999 Capital Construction Budget, this fee was identified as part of the financing package to help retire XI-F(1) Bonds. In addition, an increase in the incidental fee of $7.75 per term for operations was approved. A separate issue paper was mailed to the Board prior to the July meeting, to describe more fully the nature of this project and this fee.

Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University's incidental fees are increasing by 11.7 percent to $105 per term. Western's incidental fee has been the same since 1993-94, resulting in this increase averaging 2.9 percent per year since last adjusted. Two sets of issues account for this increase. Incidental fee budgets have been adjusted for inflation over the past several years without an increase in the fee; and the increase in the minimum wage requirement has resulted in increased costs. Specific programs have received particular increases. These include an increase in the student family childcare subsidy from 25 percent to 30 percent; additional funding to allow student groups to travel to competitions and events; the purchase of uniforms for the new women's soccer team; replacement of some uniforms in track, football, softball, baseball, and women's basketball; support for the expansion of the student broadcast operations; and assistance in support for increased swimming pool rates and increased club and educational activities.

WOU's health service fee is increasing 0.9 percent to $171. This is only a 50 cent rounding adjustment due to the change in building fee from $18.50 to $25 to allow tuition totals to be in whole dollars.

WOU proposes no increases in its technology fee of $2 per credit with a maximum of $24 per term for undergraduates and $18 per term for graduates.

Other Policy Changes: Other fees and policies set forth in Sections I, II, and III of the Academic Year Fee Book provide direction to the institutions and set other fees that are established by Board rules. Proposed changes to these policies are as follows:

The special instruction fee rate, first approved by the Board in 1996-97, of $35 per credit hour is being continued for OIT for specified lower division courses associated with the Memorandum of Understanding with Klamath Community College Service District.

Enabling language has been included for SOU to assess special lower division fees at its off-campus site in Medford at rates comparable to those of Rogue Community College. During the next four years, these course offerings will be progressively assumed by the community college as SOU moves away from providing lower division instruction in Medford and concentrates on upper division instruction. For 1997-98, SOU's rates for these classes will be at $36 per credit hour.

The proposed Administrative Rule, OAR 580-040-0040, Academic Year Fee Book, dated July 18, 1997, authorizes institutions to assess additional application fees for specific programs and/or schools within an institution, after following the administrative rule making process.

Enabling language has also been included to authorize institutions to assess special course fees, if deemed necessary, to provide courses related to meeting demand caused by the Second Language Admission Requirement.

Per-credit-hour fees for courses taken through the Oregon Center for Advanced Technology Education (OCATE) are proposed at $192 per credit hour. The staff fee policy will apply to these OCATE courses on a restricted, space and equipment available, basis.

The deferred tuition policy is being eliminated from the fee book, since it is no longer used nor needed by the institutions. The accounts receivable policy, OAR 580-040-0041, now used by all institutions, has replaced it.

Residence Hall and Food Service Charges: Institutional residence halls and food services operate as auxiliary services. As such, their fees and charges are to cover the cost of their operations. In recommending residence hall room and board charges for 1997-98, institution administrators estimated residence hall occupancy in relation to enrollment projections and present occupancy patterns.

Recommended changes for 1997-98 in room and board rates are reflected in the examples given in Schedule 6. These rates are only examples, since each institution offers various room and board combinations. Most basic room and board rates will increase between three and seven percent. The rates are detailed in the Academic Year Fee Book.

Not covered by this action are rates for the PSU campus. Student Services Northwest, Inc., a private corporation, operates the residence halls at PSU and establishes the rates as specified in a service contract. The rates require approval by PSU officials.

Report of Public Hearing on Academic Year Fee Book

Summary of Testimony Received

The public hearing on the 1997-98 Academic Year Fee Book was conducted on Thursday, June 5, 1997, in Room 121 of Susan Campbell Hall, on the UO campus. No one attended the public hearing. One individual submitted written testimony.

Mr. Scott Whipple, a student at the University of Oregon Law School, wrote concerning the increases in the resident tuition relative to the nonresident tuition. He noted that, from 1995-96 through the proposed rates for 1997-98, the resident law tuition will have increased by approximately 26 percent to $10,050 annually. In that same period, the nonresident tuition will have increased four percent to $13,688 per year. While he acknowledged the effects of Measures 5 and 47 on the funding levels of the University, his "concern is the decision by the law school to disproportionately place the financial burden on Oregon residents." Mr. Whipple cited communications with several university officials.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends that the Board amend OAR 580-040-0040 as follows:

(Italicized material is added; brackets denote deletion.)

OAR 580-040-0040 Academic Year Fee Book

The document entitled "Academic Year Fee Book" dated July 18, 1997 [July 19, 1996], is hereby amended by reference as a permanent rule. All prior adoptions of academic year fee documents are hereby repealed except as to rights and obligations previously acquired or incurred thereunder.

Through the amendment, the Board adopts the document entitled Academic Year Fee Book, memos of attachment amending the draft document, and other amendments and attached schedules noted in this agenda item.

BOARD ACTION: (Roll call vote required)

Annual Tuition Rates in Representative Institutions - 1997-98*
In Descending Order of Resident Undergraduate 1997-98 Rate

Schedule 1 (A)
Public Colleges/Universities in the West

Institutions Year Resid.
U/Grad
Nonres.
U/Grad
Res.
Grad.
Nonres.
Grad.
Western Oregon University 1996-97 3,099 9,117 4,809 8,619
1997-98 3,153 9,429 4,992 8,916
% Change 1.7% 3.4% 3.8% 3.4%
West. Washington Univ. 1996-97 2,613 8,796 4,065 12,000
1997-98 2,771 9,206 4,286 12,536
% Change 6.0% 4.7% 5.4% 4.5%
Eastern Montana College 1996-97 2,388 6,559 2,756 6,928
1997-98 2,517 6,976 2,896 7,356
% Change 5.4% 6.4% 5.1% 6.2%
Boise State Univ. 1996-97 2,104 7,450 2,578 7,924
1997-98 2,294 8,174 2,816 8,696
% Change 9.0% 9.7% 9.2% 9.7%
West. St. Coll. Colorado 1996-97 2,086 7,064 -- --
1997-98 2,152 7,333 -- --
% Change 3.2% 3.8% -- --
Chico State Univ. 1996-97 2,046 9,426 2,046 5,982
1997-98 2,071 9,451 2,071 6,007
% Change 1.2% 0.3% 1.2% 0.4%
North. Arizona Univ. 1996-97 2,010 7,526 2,010 7,526
1997-98 2,058 7,824 2,808 8,574
% Change 2.4% 4.0% 39.7% 13.9%
South. Utah St. Coll. 1996-97 1,800 5,652 1,935 6,180
(97-98 data not available.) 1997-98 n/a n/a n/a n/a
% Change -- -- -- --
West. New Mexico Univ. 1996-97 1,516 5,604 1,636 5,724
1997-98 1,564 5,652 1,644 5,732
% Change 3.2% 0.9% 0.5% 0.1%
Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo 1996-97 938 5,786 -- --
1997-98 1,322 6,938 -- --
% Change 40.9% 19.9% -- --

* NOTE: Many of the 1997-98 numbers are tentative pending approval by policy setting body.

Schedule 1 (B)
Public Universities in the West *

Institutions Year Resid.
U/Grad
Nonres.
U/Grad
Res.
Grad.
Nonres.
Grad.
U. of Cal., Berkeley 1996-97 4,355 12,749 4,395 12,789
1997-98 4,355 13,339 4,395 13,379
% Change 0.0% 4.6% 0.0% 4.6%
U. of Cal., Davis 1996-97 4,230 12,624 4,419 12,813
1997-98 4,332 13,316 4,495 13,479
% Change 2.4% 5.5% 1.7% 5.2%
U. of Alaska, Southeast 1996-97 3,428 10,148 5,576 11,084
1997-98 3,736 10,936 5,956 11,356
% Change 9.0% 7.8% 6.8% 2.5%
U. of Oregon 1996-97 3,540 11,664 5,889 10,062
1997-98 3,648 12,099 6,150 10,449
% Change 3.1% 3.7% 4.4% 3.8%
Oregon State Univ. 1996-97 3,447 11,085 5,796 9,891
1997-98 3,510 11,460 6,012 10,230
% Change 1.8% 3.4% 3.7% 3.4%
U. of Washington 1996-97 3,258 9,873 5,052 12,483
1997-98 3,366 10,656 5,232 12,966
% Change 3.3% 7.9% 3.6% 3.9%
U. of Hawaii, Manoa 1996-97 2,421 7,869 3,261 8,205
1997-98 2,949 9,429 3,909 9,837
% Change 21.8% 19.8% 19.9% 19.9%
Colorado State Univ. 1996-97 2,855 9,792 3,193 10,187
1997-98 2,925 10,147 3,267 10,557
% Change 2.5% 3.6% 2.3% 3.6%
U. of Colorado, Boulder 1996-97 2,840 14,432 3,602 14,216
1997-98 2,907 14,951 3,681 14,735
% Change 2.4% 3.6% 2.2% 3.7%
U. of Utah 1996-97 2,514 7,713 2,041 6,185
1997-98 2,601 7,998 2,117 6,411
% Change 3.5% 3.7% 3.7% 3.7%
U. of Montana 1996-97 2,485 6,734 2,323 5,816
(97-98 data not available) 1997-98 n/a n/a n/a n/a
% Change -- -- -- --
U. of Alaska, Fairbanks 1996-97 2,470 5,830 3,544 6,298
1997-98 2,527 5,964 3,626 6,443
% Change 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3%
U. of Wyoming 1996-97 2,144 6,872 2,597 7,325
1997-98 2,326 7,414 2,812 7,900
% Change 8.5% 7.9% 8.3% 7.9%
Utah State Univ. 1996-97 1,992 6,042 1,182 3,690
1997-98 2,174 6,615 1,951 5,828
% Change 9.1% 9.5% 65.1% 57.9%
U. of New Mexico 1996-97 2,071 7,922 2,247 8,024
1997-98 2,165 8,174 2,349 8,386
% Change 4.5% 3.2% 4.5% 4.5%
Arizona State Univ. 1996-97 2,010 8,378 2,010 8,378
1997-98 2,058 8,710 3,058 9,710
% Change 2.4% 4.0% 52.1% 15.9%
U. of Nevada, Reno 1996-97 1,920 7,020 1,392 6,492
1997-98 1,995 7,430 1,440 6,499
% Change 3.9% 5.8% 3.4% 0.1%
U. of Idaho 1996-97 1,768 7,420 2,308 7,960
1997-98 1,942 7,742 2,482 8,282
% Change 9.8% 4.3% 7.5% 4.0%

* NOTE: Many of the 1997-98 numbers are tentative pending approval by policy setting body.

Schedule 1 (C)
Annual Tuition Rates in Representative Institutions - 1997-98*
In Descending Order of Resid. U/Grad 1997-98 Rate
PAC-10 Public Institutions


Institutions

Year
Resid.
U/Grad
Nonres.
U/Grad
Res.
Grad.
Nonres.
Grad.
U. of Cal., Berkeley 1996-97 4,355 12,749 4,395 12,789
1997-98 4,355 13,339 4,395 13,379
% Change 0.0% 4.6% 0.0% 4.6%
U. of Cal., Los Angeles 1996-97 4,001 12,395 4,473 12,867
1997-98 4,044 13,026 4,496 13,478
% Change 1.1% 5.1% 0.5% 4.7%
U. of Oregon 1996-97 3,540 11,664 5,889 10,062
1997-98 3,648 12,099 6,150 10,449
% Change 3.1% 3.7% 4.4% 3.8%
Oregon State Univ. 1996-97 3,447 11,085 5,796 9,891
1997-98 3,510 11,460 6,012 10,230
% Change 1.8% 3.4% 3.7% 3.4%
Washington State Univ. 1996-97 3,142 8,866 4,936 12,368
1997-98 3,394 10,276 5,260 12,994
% Change 8.0% 15.9% 6.6% 5.1%
U. of Washington 1996-97 3,258 9,873 5,052 12,483
1997-98 3,366 10,656 5,232 12,966
% Change 3.3% 7.9% 3.6% 3.9%
Arizona State Univ. 1996-97 2,010 8,378 2,010 8,378
1997-98 2,058 8,710 3,058 9,710
% Change 2.4% 4.0% 52.1% 15.9%
U. of Arizona 1996-97 2,010 8,378 2,010 8,378
1997-98 2,058 8,710 3,058 9,710
% Change 2.4% 4.0% 52.1% 15.9%

* NOTE: Many of the 1997-98 numbers are tentative pending approval by policy setting body.

Schedule 2
Instruction Fee Recommendations
Full-Time Student
1997-98 Academic Year

1996-97 1997-98 % Change
EOU
Undergraduate Resident 2,316 2,316 0.0%
Undergraduate Nonresident 2,316 2,316 0.0%
Graduate Resident 4,116 4,242 3.0%
Graduate Nonresident 7,896 8,133 3.0%
OIT
Undergraduate Resident 2,592 2,592 0.0%
Undergraduate Nonresident 9,534 9,822 3.0%
Graduate Resident 4,248 4,377 3.0%
Graduate Nonresident 8,058 8,301 3.0%
OSU
Undergraduate Resident 2,694 2,694 0.0%
Undergraduate Nonresident 10,332 10,644 3.0%
Graduate Resident 5,043 5,196 3.0%
Graduate Nonresident 9,138 9,414 3.0%
PSU
Undergraduate Resident 2,694 2,694 0.0%
Undergraduate Nonresident 9,960 10,260 3.0%
Graduate Resident 5,043 5,196 3.0%
Graduate Nonresident 9,138 9,414 3.0%
SOU
Undergraduate Resident 2,520 2,520 0.0%
Undergraduate Nonresident 8,220 8,469 3.0%
Graduate Resident 4,248 4,377 3.0%
Graduate Nonresident 8,058 8,301 3.0%
UO
Undergraduate Resident 2,694 2,694 0.0%
Undergraduate Nonresident 10,818 11,145 3.0%
Graduate Resident 5,043 5,196 3.0%
Graduate Nonresident 9,216 9,495 3.0%
WOU
Undergraduate Resident 2,520 2,520 0.0%
Undergraduate Nonresident 8,538 8,796 3.0%
Graduate Resident 4,248 4,377 3.0%
Graduate Nonresident 8,058 8,301 3.0%
Other
OSU Vet Med Res 8,424 8,679 3.0%
OSU Vet Med Nonres 17,187 17,703 3.0%
UO Law Resident 5,044 5,196 3.0%
UO Law Nonresident 8,576 8,834 3.0%

Schedule 3
Building, Incidental, Health Service, and Resources Fee Recommendations
Full-Time Student
1997-98 Academic Year
1996-97 1997-98 % Change
Building Fee
All Institutions 55.50 75.00 35.1%
UO Law (Semester) 54.00 75.00 38.9%
Incidental Fee
EOU 489.00 537.00 9.8%
OIT 297.00 345.00 16.2%
OIT Metro Center 6.00 6.00 0.0%
OSU 340.50 360.00 5.7%
PSU 304.50 300.00 -1.5%
SOU 319.50 343.50 7.5%
UO 403.50 443.25 9.9%
UO Law (Semester) 405.00 443.25 9.4%
WOU 282.00 315.00 11.7%
Health Service Fee
EOU 151.50 153.00 1.0%
OIT 196.50 225.00 14.5%
OSU 207.00 225.00 8.7%
PSU 162.00 162.00 0.0%
SOU 180.00 193.50 7.5%
UO 237.00 240.00 1.3%
UO Law (Semester) 237.00 240.00 1.3%
WOU 169.50 171.00 0.9%
Resource Fees
EOU:
Technology Fee - All 150 150 0.0%
OIT:
Technology Fee - All 0 72 ****
OSU:
Technology Fee - All 150 156 4.0%
MBA Residents 375 390 4.0%
MBA Nonresidents 915 945 3.3%
Engineering 375 390 4.0%
Pharmacy 2,940 3,030 3.1%
PSU:
Technology - Undergraduates 126 126 0.0%
Technology - Graduates 135 135 0.0%
Sch. of Bus. Masters 300 300 0.0%
Engineering 300 300 0.0%
SOU:
Technology Fee - All 72 72 0.0%
MBA Residents 300 300 0.0%
MBA Nonresidents 450 450 0.0%
UO:
Technology Fee - All 150 150 0.0%
Law Residents 3,200 3,900 21.9%
Law Nonresidents 4,150 3,900 -6.0%
C. of Bus. Master Residents 300 300 0.0%
C. of Bus. Master Nonresid'ts 750 750 0.0%
Honors College 0 150 ****
WOU:
Technology Undergraduates 72 72 0.0%
Technology Graduates 54 54 0.0%
UO Rec/Fitness Ctr Bond Fee
UO 0.00 15.25 --

Schedule 4
Total Tuition Recommendations
Full-Time Student
1997-98 Academic Year
Full-Time Tuition
1996-97 1997-98 % Change
EOU
Undergraduate Resident 3,162 3,231 2.2%
Undergraduate Nonresident 3,162 3,231 2.2%
Graduate Resident 4,962 5,157 3.9%
Graduate Nonresident 8,742 9,048 3.5%
OIT
Undergraduate Resident 3,141 3,309 5.3%
Undergraduate Nonresident 10,083 10,539 4.5%
Graduate Resident 4,797 5,094 6.2%
Graduate Nonresident 8,607 9,018 4.8%
OSU
Undergraduate Resident 3,447 3,510 1.8%
Undergraduate Nonresident 11,085 11,460 3.4%
Graduate Resident 5,796 6,012 3.7%
Graduate Nonresident 9,891 10,230 3.4%
PSU
Undergraduate Resident 3,342 3,357 0.4%
Undergraduate Nonresident 10,608 10,923 3.0%
Graduate Resident 5,700 5,868 2.9%
Graduate Nonresident 9,795 10,086 3.0%
SOU
Undergraduate Resident 3,147 3,204 1.8%
Undergraduate Nonresident 8,847 9,153 3.5%
Graduate Resident 4,875 5,061 3.8%
Graduate Nonresident 8,685 8,985 3.5%
UO
Undergraduate Resident 3,540 3,648 3.1%
Undergraduate Nonresident 11,664 12,099 3.7%
Graduate Resident 5,889 6,150 4.4%
Graduate Nonresident 10,062 10,449 3.8%
WOU
Undergraduate Resident 3,099 3,153 1.7%
Undergraduate Nonresident 9,117 9,429 3.4%
Graduate Resident 4,809 4,992 3.8%
Graduate Nonresident 8,619 8,916 3.4%
Specific Institution Programs
OIT Metro Undergr Res 2,654 2,745 3.4%
OIT Metro Undergr Nonres 9,596 9,975 4.0%
OIT Metro Grad Res 4,310 4,530 5.1%
OIT Metro Grad Nonres 8,120 8,454 4.1%
OSU MBA Resident 6,171 6,402 3.7%
OSU MBA Nonresident 10,806 11,175 3.4%
OSU Engineering Undergrad Res 3,822 3,900 2.0%
OSU Engineering Undergr Nonres 11,460 11,850 3.4%
OSU Engineering Grad Res 6,171 6,402 3.7%
OSU Engineering Grad Nonres 10,266 10,620 3.4%
OSU Pharmacy Undergr Res 6,387 6,540 2.4%
OSU Pharmacy Undergr Nonres 14,025 14,490 3.3%
OSU PharmD Res 8,736 9,042 3.5%
OSU PharmD Nonres 12,831 13,260 3.3%
OSU Vet Med Res 9,177 9,495 3.5%
OSU Vet Med Nonres 17,940 18,519 3.2%
PSU MBA Grad Res 6,000 6,168 2.8%
PSU MBA Grad Nonres 10,095 10,386 2.9%
PSU Engineering Undergrad Res 3,642 3,657 0.4%
PSU Engineering Undergr Nonres 10,908 11,223 2.9%
PSU Engineering Grad Res 6,000 6,168 2.8%
PSU Engineering Grad Nonres 10,095 10,386 2.9%
SOU MBA Grad Res 5,175 5,361 3.6%
SOU MBA Grad Nonres 9,135 9,435 3.3%
UO CBA Resident 6,189 6,450 4.2%
UO CBA Nonresident 10,812 11,199 3.6%
UO Law Resident 9,090 10,050 10.6%
UO Law Nonresident 13,572 13,688 0.9%

Note: Tuition includes fees for instruction, resource, building, incidental, and health service fees at all institutions.

* At the OIT Metro Center only the instruction fee, building fee, and a special $6 annual incidental fee are mandatory; other fees are optional.

Schedule 5
Resident Undergraduate Tuition
Comparing Relative Increases
With and Without a Three Percent Instruction Fee Increase




1996-97 Tuition Rates


Proposed
1997-98
@ 0%Incr
Instr'n Fee


Percent
Increase 96-97 to 97-98
Tuition with No Instruction Fee Freeze
1997-98
@ 3% Incr
Instr'n Fee

Percent
Increase 96-97 to 97-98
EOU 3,162 3,231 2.2% 3,300 4.4%
OIT 3,141 3,309 5.3% 3,387 7.8%
OSU 3,447 3,510 1.8% 3,591 4.2%
PSU 3,342 3,357 0.4% 3,438 2.9%
SOU 3,147 3,204 1.8% 3,279 4.2%
UO 3,540 3,648 3.1% 3,729 5.3%
WOU 3,099 3,153 1.7% 3,228 4.2%

Schedule 6
Oregon Department of Higher Education
Comparison of Basic Residence Hall Rates 1996-97 to 1997-98

The following are comparative samples of board and room rates for a basic dorm room with double occupancy and the student on a 19 meal per week plan. Each institution offers a variety of room and meal options at rates above and below these listed. Refer to the Fee Book for a more definitive schedule of rates.
1996-97 1997-98 % Change
Eastern Oregon University
Basic multiple, 19 meals 4,070 4,265 4.79%
Oregon Institute of Technology
Basic multiple, 19 meals 4,045 4,180 3.34%
Oregon State University
Basic multiple, 19 meals 4,526 4,850 7.16%
Southern Oregon University
Basic multiple, 19 meals 4,181 4,393 5.07%
University of Oregon
Basic multiple, 19 meals 4,342 4,646 7.00%
Western Oregon University
Basic multiple, 19 meals 4,065 4,268 4.99%

B.S. IN BIOCHEMISTRY, UO

Introduction

The University of Oregon (UO) requests authorization to offer a new instructional program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry. The Board reviewed a preliminary proposal for this program on February 16, 1996. This program will be offered through the Department of Chemistry in the College of Arts and Sciences. This proposed degree would rename the biochemistry track as it exists within the current chemistry degree program, and is consistent with UO's research university identity and mission. A biochemistry program currently exists at Oregon State University. The proposed program is within the capacity of the UO to offer as it is in response to the large proportion of chemistry students who currently pursue the biochemistry option. No new resources are needed to implement the program.

Staff Analysis

1. Relationship to Mission

The proposed program is consistent with UO's mission statement, combines the UO emphases on research and undergraduate education, and would make "free-standing" the biochemistry option within the current chemistry major. The UO currently offers chemistry degrees through the Ph.D. level. This proposed program has been designed to prepare undergraduates for a research career in either an academic or industrial environment or a professional career, such as the medical profession.

2. Evidence of Need

The Chemistry Department regularly fields requests for the proposed program from current and potential students, and approximately one-half of the current chemistry majors choose the biochemistry track for their undergraduate degree. Further, having the biochemistry major specifically noted on their transcripts will assist students in seeking employment in such areas as Oregon's growing biotechnology industry.

A career as a biochemist is listed as one of the current best options and fields for advancement as described in Field's 100 Best Careers for the 21st Century (1996). Salary ranges are from $25,000 to $75,000 at the bachelor's level in biochemistry. In addition to biotechnology areas, employment opportunities exist with and in pharmaceutical companies, clinical biochemistry, hospital laboratories, neuroscience research, genetic research studies, toxicology, forensic science and crime laboratories, agricultural chemicals, food sciences, feed manufacturers, consumer product manufacturers, and environmental protection fields.

3. Quality of the Proposed Program

Because this proposed program is already being offered as the recognized "biochemistry track" of the current chemistry major, quality of the program is assured. The Chemistry Department has a research-active faculty and the department offers degrees through the Ph.D. level. The UO program is unique because of the Chemistry Department's relationship to the highly successful and interdepartmental Institute of Molecular Biology; students majoring in biochemistry have the opportunity to participate in research programs with faculty and staff of this highly respected organization. The current biochemistry program is certified by the American Chemical Society (ACS), which examines the curriculum, faculty, and other resources of the department. ACS certification of the proposed biochemistry major will be sought at the next five-year review in 1998 and, given the reputation and quality of the Chemistry Department and the UO's program in molecular biology, this proposed major should be easily certified.

The course of study for the major will consist of 156 credits of lower-division requirements in science and mathematics, 71-74 credits at the upper-division in science (chemistry, biochemistry, and biology), and three courses of advanced science electives.

The quality of the UO biochemistry program is also reflected in the success of its graduates. For example, in 1996, all nine of the chemistry/biochemistry students who applied to medical schools were accepted. (For 1997, the number is two out of three.) Medical schools to which graduates have gone include Oregon Health Sciences University, Northwestern University School of Medicine, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, UCLA, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Washington. Other biochemistry graduates have gone on to other graduate programs and directly into employment in industry.

4. Adequacy of Resources to Offer the Program

Faculty. No new funds for faculty are required to implement this proposed program. Chemistry faculty are complemented by strong biochemically oriented faculty in the Biology and Physics Departments. With the long-time existence of the biochemistry option within the chemistry major, the current course offerings in the Chemistry Department are entirely sufficient to support the proposed program.

Library, Facilities, and Equipment. Library resources at the UO are sufficient to support Ph.D. programs in chemistry/biochemistry and are, therefore, sufficient to support the demands of this proposed undergraduate major. Similarly, classroom space and laboratory facilities currently support the biochemistry track of the chemistry degree and are sufficient for the proposed major.

Program Review

The proposed program has been reviewed positively by all appropriate institutional committees as well as the Academic Council.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommended that the Board authorize the University of Oregon to establish a program leading to the B.S. in Biochemistry effective fall term 1997. A follow-up review of the program will be conducted by the State System Office of Academic Affairs in the 2002-03 academic year.

Board Discussion and Action (June 20, 1997)

UO Provost Moseley described the program, pointing out that knowledge does not "respect" the boundaries of disciplines. "For many years students have been taking courses that are the functional equivalent of a biochemistry degree," explained Dr. Moseley, "but we did not have the authority to award them that degree." This program would change that without adding new faculty or requiring additional resources.

Mr. Swanson moved and Mr. Willis seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, Van Patten, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

BOARD ACTION:

B.S. IN MATHEMATICS & COMPUTER SCIENCE (JOINT MAJOR), UO

Introduction

The University of Oregon (UO) requests authorization to offer a new instructional program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Computer Science (Joint Major). The Board reviewed a preliminary proposal for this program on February 16, 1996. This program will be offered through the Departments of Mathematics and Computer and Information Science in the College of Arts and Sciences. The program is designed to develop team players in Oregon's information-based economic future and is most appropriate for students who would, at the present time, pursue a major in either computer science or mathematics. This proposed degree is a combination of two current degrees, both of which are consistent with UO's mission and the University's productivity plan. There are similar programs at Western Oregon University (recently approved by the Board at its April 18, 1997, meeting) and Southern Oregon University. The proposed program is within the capacity of the University to offer, is in response to growing needs in the high-tech sector of Oregon's economy, and provides a course of study that would enable graduates to directly enter industrial positions or pursue advanced programs of study in either discipline. No new resources are needed to implement the program.

Staff Analysis

  1. Relationship to Mission

This proposed program combining existing majors is consistent with UO's mission by uniting its research and undergraduate education agendas. The UO currently offers degrees in both disciplines through the Ph.D. level. The proposed undergraduate degree program would (1) offer students substantial amounts of two complementary disciplines and combine them in a single degree program; (2) enable graduates of the program to proceed directly into appropriate industrial positions that require both computer science skills and mathematical problem-solving ability; and/or (3) prepare graduates to enter graduate study in either discipline (or in applied areas such as biological computational science).

The proposed program is also consistent with the University's 1994 academic productivity plan, which emphasizes the importance of offering realistic four-year degree programs. Students who are likely to enroll in this proposed program are those currently interested in a major in mathematics, computer science, or a double major. This flexible degree program will emphasize basic principles in the two disciplines; will provide students with a well-rounded background in both areas; is at least as suitable and marketable than more specialized programs; and features a realistic expectation for completion in four years.

2. Evidence of Need

This program responds directly to identified market needs in the region as students will be well-prepared to enter Oregon's expanding computer technologies industries. UO students have expressed considerable interest in pursuing a joint degree such as is proposed here, with as many as 10 to 20 percent of students now enrolled as mathematics or computer science majors as likely candidates. Ten to 20 graduates per year are anticipated.

Typically, students who major in mathematics or in math-computer science tend to be talented, hard-working students with highly developed analytical skills and, as a result, tend to be highly employable. This is especially true in today's economy. National need for graduates of this program is indicated by the 1996-97 edition of the Occupational Outlook Handbook, which lists "computer scientists and systems analysts" to be the fastest-growing field (in terms of number of projected openings) during the years 1994 to 2005. Further, the Oregon Occupational Projections Handbook (for the years 1996 to 2005) indicates that employment in the categories of computer systems analysis, computer science, and computer science teachers will remain high in the state, with an accelerating ten-year job growth rate. Based on a projected growth rate of up to 8 percent, as many as 440 positions in the state's software industry alone may be created annually. When the needs of other high-tech industries are considered, as well as the demand for high-tech employees in commercial businesses and government offices, as many as 800 to 1,200 positions in this field may be needed. In all OSSHE institutions last year, 167 students graduated with baccalaureates in computer science and 103 in mathematics. Given the projected trends in the industry, therefore, it is anticipated that the employment picture for UO's mathematics and computer science degree holders will be excellent.

3. Quality of the Proposed Program

The strength of the curriculum and the quality of the faculty all point to this proposed program as one of high quality.

Curriculum. The two disciplines that comprise this joint major are long-standing programs at UO, and the integrating theme of this degree will be mathematical and scientific rigor in the field of computer science. Much of present-day computer science evolved out of mathematics and these fields have always been connected. Faculty and student interests range along a continuum from pure mathematics to quite non-mathematical areas of computer science, with this joint major lying somewhere in the middle of that continuum. This proposed program consists of a coordinated blend of courses from the two fields.

Additionally, students in this program have the opportunity to participate in internships as part of their educational experience. A student intern receives credit or pay for work performed for an industry client under joint supervision of an industry mentor and a faculty member. Recent examples of local internship sites are Hyundai, Software Science, Dynamix, and Spectra Physics; summer internships have taken place at industries such as Intel, Tektronix, Sequent, Hewlett-Packard, and Silicon Graphics. Internships are generally seen as highly successful experiences for both the student and the industry client and often lead to permanent employment.

Faculty. The faculty of the Mathematics Department and the Computer and Information Science Department are nationally recognized experts in their respective fields. According to the classification system of mathematics departments by the American Mathematical Society, the UO department fits comfortably into "Group 1" (i.e., into the top tier of [the 40 best] math departments in the country). Faculty members have received a number of prestigious professional awards and fellowships and include two past presidents of the Mathematical Association of America.

The computer and information science faculty are similarly recognized. The department consists of an IEEE Fellow (the highest award conferred by the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers); a recipient of the Fulkerson Prize in Discrete Mathematics (from the Mathematical Programming Society and the American Mathematical Society); three award winners of the National Young Investigators Award/Career Award (from the National Science Foundation); and a recipient of the Faculty Award for Women (from the National Science Foundation). Department faculty have also been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation in curriculum development in order to teach computer science in a holistic context, integrating cooperation and communication skills with scientific and technical education.

4. Adequacy of Resources to Offer the Program

Faculty. No new funds for faculty are required to implement this proposed program. The current course offerings in mathematics and computer science are entirely sufficient to support the proposed program.

Library, Facilities, and Equipment. Library resources at the UO are sufficient to support Ph.D. programs in each of the disciplinary areas and are therefore sufficient to support the demands of this proposed joint undergraduate major. Current computing facilities and equipment are sufficient to implement the program and include Macintosh laboratories administered by the computing center, the computer laboratory in the mathematics department, and the Unix workstation lab administered by the computer and information science department. Further, plans are underway to develop new undergraduate laboratories in cooperation with Intel and Microsoft.

Program Review

The proposed program has been reviewed positively by all appropriate institutional committees as well as the Academic Council.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommended that the Board authorize the University of Oregon to establish a program leading to the B.S. in Mathematics and Computer Science effective fall term 1997. A follow-up review of the program will be conducted by the State System Office of Academic Affairs in the 2002-03 academic year.

Board Discussion and Action (June 20, 1997)

Vice Chancellor Clark and UO Provost Moseley reviewed the docket item. Dr. Aschkenasy asked if this program is expected to increase the number of people interested in the major. Dr. Moseley responded that they anticipate that it would draw more of the mathematics majors who are interested in computer science.

President Aschkenasy inquired about the need for other OSSHE schools who currently offer computer science degrees to consider adding this program. Chancellor Cox responded that computer science grew out of the overlap between math and physics. That was the pattern at WOU and SOU. OSU's program grew out of engineering. Dr. Cox added that a recent article in The Chronicle of Higher Education noted the number of elite universities that are moving into distance education -- institutions who had previously never considered distance education. "Boundaries will not mean much of anything. The customer is in charge. All of that has implications for us to be providing multiple offerings to students."

Ms. McAllister moved and Ms. Wustenberg seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Directors Christopher, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, Van Patten, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

BOARD ACTION:

B.S. IN MANAGEMENT, OIT

Introduction

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) requests authorization to offer the Bachelor of Science Degree in Management. OIT has a long history of offering management technology programs. An accounting emphasis dates back to the beginning of OIT in 1947, a marketing emphasis dates back to the late 1970s, and an entrepreneurship and small business management emphasis has been developing over the past several years. In 1994, OIT focused its B.S. in Industrial Management to comply with the Related Accreditation Council of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (RAC/ABET). This resulted in OIT's losing the flexibility to offer emphasis areas that were previously available. The proposed degree program would provide a home for those -- and other -- emphasis areas. This is essentially a splitting up of the existing Industrial Management degree, half of which becomes a newly titled Production and Operations Management Program accredited by RAC/ABET; the proposed program in Management becomes the other half. The proposed program is fully in line with OIT's Strategic Plan for 1994-1999. All courses in the new core program are offered in the present Industrial Management core. The faculty needed to develop and deliver seven new or significantly revised courses are on staff and qualified for this set of responsibilities. No new resources are needed to implement the program.

Staff Analysis

2. Relationship to Mission

The proposed program is directly related to OIT's mission, which includes providing degree programs in the applied technologies such as "business technologies." The mission of the Department of Management is to prepare leaders to manage organizations in the high technology environments of the 21st century. This program falls within this mission.

3. Evidence of Need

The OIT program offered through the Department of Management within the School of Engineering and Industrial Technologies responds to regional needs. Klamath County employment is characterized by small businesses. There are expected to be increasing opportunities and demand for managers trained in small business management. Marketing, both at the level of the small business as well as industry and county levels, will become increasingly important. The emerging tourism industry will require skilled marketing specialists if it is to achieve its potential in southern Oregon. Klamath County's desire to increase production and marketing of processed agricultural products will also provide opportunities for managers knowledgeable in marketing.

An additional growing market is to serve the Klamath Tribes, where emphasis areas in accounting, marketing, and small business management are needed to facilitate several small businesses that have been started by members of the Klamath Tribes. As the Klamath Community College service district develops, an additional number of students are expected to move to Klamath Community College with an intention to participate in 2+2-type programs, requiring expanded demand for baccalaureate educational opportunities.

4. Quality of the Proposed Program

The program builds on a long tradition of OIT's offering Management Technology programs. The accounting emphasis dates back to the beginning of OIT in 1947. The marketing emphasis dates back to the late 1970s. The entrepreneurship and small business management emphasis has been developing over the past several years. With a focusing of the Industrial Management degree to comply with accreditation requirements in 1994, OIT lost flexibility to continue to offer these and other emphasis areas. The proposed program would enable OIT to split the existing Industrial Management degree so that half becomes a newly titled Production and Operations Management program accredited by RAC/ABET, and this becomes an additional program in the Department of Management, with emphases in accounting, marketing, and entrepreneurship and small business management.

The program is targeted for implementation in fall 1997. The majority of students in the program are expected to come from the local geographic area. This program provides opportunities for degree completion for people presently employed, as well as bringing groups into higher education not well represented at present, particularly those who will enter OIT via the Klamath Community College route.

All of the courses in the Management Technology core are present in the Industrial Management core program at OIT. In the three emphasis areas, OIT will offer a total of 27 courses; 20 have already been developed and delivered at OIT. Eleven faculty are available to participate in the program and qualified to develop and deliver the seven new or significantly revised courses.

The proposed program will be designed to bring students to a sophisticated level of competence in microcomputer applications. Application of technologies, especially in computer hardware and software, is a core competency in the course of instruction.

All students will complete senior projects. In each of the emphases, students will be required to work with an actual client in the business community to develop an original solution to a real-world problem. Each senior project requires a 200-hour commitment of time from the student, who must use tools and techniques drawn from at least five disciplines within the curriculum. In addition to the senior projects, students have the opportunity to participate in co-op experiences and/or internships.

While the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) is the closest specialized accrediting body with standards relevant to this program, the regional universities' business programs are not presently accredited by ASBSP. OIT does not plan accreditation with ACBSP. A significant segment of the program that is already accredited by RAC/ABET will be maintained.

5. Adequacy of Resources to Offer the Program

All requisite resources to successfully offer this program are in place. Faculty currently involved in the Industrial Management program will be responsible for the proposed B.S. in Management. Library resources to support the proposed program are adequate. Facilities, equipment, and technology are adequately equipped to support the proposed program, which essentially is a spin-off from the existing Industrial Management program.

Program Review

The proposed program has been reviewed positively by appropriate institutional committees and the OSSHE Academic Council.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommended that the Board authorize Oregon Institute of Technology to establish a program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Management with emphases in Accounting, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management, effective fall term 1997, with a follow-up review of the program to be conducted by the State System Office of Academic Affairs in the 2002-03 academic year.

Board Discussion and Action (June 20, 1997)

OIT Provost Dow reviewed the program, noting that there has been considerable dialogue within the Klamath Basin community, including International Guard, Merle West Medical Center, Columbia Plywood, and Aqua Glass. She also indicated that OIT has a Small Business Development Center that currently provides consulting. However, many of the people with whom they work would like actual coursework and degrees. In addition, there are many industry people with associate degrees who would like to complete baccalaureate degrees. Dr. Dow also stated that they are preparing to offer parts of this program in the evening, packaged as certificates for those people with degrees who would like a certificate in an emphasis area.

Ms. Wustenberg asked if the follow-up reviews are presented to the Board. Vice Chancellor Clark responded that they are, usually in July. "We have had a Board policy for perhaps six or seven years to do five-year follow-up reviews of programs. They are brief, descriptive reviews, but they are revealing."

Ms. McAllister asked if there is a mechanism for tracking programs that are dropped. Vice Chancellor Clark responded that her office does track programs that are dropped and provides that list to the Board periodically. "Sometimes you'll notice a statement in the program proposal that signals a phasing out of one program when the proposed program is installed. This is not true of all the programs, but some of them."

Ms. Christopher asked if all the programs brought before the Board for approval have gone through the preproposal process. Vice Chancellor Clark responded that while the majority do, this program was "fast tracked" so that OIT could respond to changing regional needs by making opportunities available more immediately. In addition, Dr. Cox pointed out that this program is an adaptation of an existing program rather than a new program. Ms. McAllister concurred that this fast tracking was important to address current needs. Ms. Christopher requested a list of when program preproposals have gone to the Board.

Ms. McAllister inquired about the basis for putting programs on the consent agenda. Dr. Thompson responded that the purpose of the consent agenda is to permit the public adequate time to respond to concerns about proposed programs. Dr. Clark added that all approved programs are automatically moved to the next month's consent agenda.

Ms. Puentes moved and Ms. Christopher seconded the motion to approve the staff recommendation. The following voted in favor: Ms. Christopher, McAllister, Puentes, Swanson, Van Patten, Whittaker, Willis, Wustenberg, Wykoff, and Aschkenasy. Those voting no: none.

BOARD ACTION:

HUMAN RESOURCES INFORMATION SYSTEM (HRIS) STATUS REPORT

Staff Report to the Board

This is the first status report to the Board on the Systemwide Human Resources Information System (HRIS) since April 1995. At that time, an HRIS steering committee was evaluating the administrative processing requirements of all campuses in conjunction with selection of a human resources software system. By April 1996, OSSHE had decided to proceed with implementation of the HRIS as the third major component of an integrated enterprise solution for administrative information systems using the SCT Banner product. The first two major administrative information systems, the Student Information System and the Financial Information System, were fully implemented in 1991 and 1995 respectively. By fall 1996, HRIS implementation was underway, with a master implementation plan calling for the system to "go live" in July 1998. The HRIS project is currently under budget and on schedule.

This project will provide key elements of a higher education management information system. The new HRIS will complete integration of the three administrative information systems into a single database, with common data elements and common software technology. Payroll and personnel information will be integrated with the existing financial information system. The integrated systems will enable all appropriate staff to access administrative information. It is designed to improve currency and accuracy of human resources data available to personnel officers, administrators, and academic departments as well as selected staff in the Chancellor's Office.

The current system does not meet state standards for "open systems." It uses outdated and unsupported operating software and hardware technology that will not function after the year 1999. By decommissioning the existing mainframe computer and associated software, and implementing the new HRIS system using new software, one of OSSHE's most significant Year 2000 problems will be resolved.

The HRIS project supports the goals of Senate Bill 271, the Higher Education Administrative Efficiency Act. It gives campus administrators an opportunity to evaluate personnel procedures and organizational structures to improve them as appropriate. The project will result in new personnel and payroll processing efficiencies, reducing or eliminating duplicate work and reducing the cost per transaction. In many cases, human resource functions that are now performed manually will be automated. Campuses have the opportunity to decide which offices and staff will have access to the HRIS. Some campuses have elected to fully distribute access at the department level within the constraints of data security, while others prefer to offer centralized services from the campus business or personnel office.

OSSHE has selected a distributed data architecture to implement the software. The human resources databases are physically located on each of the campuses of the three larger universities (OSU, PSU, and UO) and are integrated with the student and financial data that also reside on the local mainframe computers. The regional campuses (EOU, SOU, WOU, and OIT) are supported through OSSHE's "fifth site" model with the financial and human resources databases physically located on the mainframe in Corvallis and supported by the Chancellor's Office information technology staff. The "fifth site" model allows full integration of each regional university's financial and human resources data but relies on a data warehouse to integrate the student data for management reporting and information analysis.

While the HRIS project initiatives are now focused on implementing the SCT Human Resources Information System for both personnel and payroll operations, ancillary systems include an applicant tracking system and time and attendance system. An applicant tracking system has been successfully implemented on all the campuses. Campus human resource professionals have expressed positive feedback on the short learning curve for training, ease of use, and reporting capabilities of the new system. A vendor for the new time and attendance system will be selected soon as a result of a Request for Proposals (RFP) issued earlier this year. All products use a relational database system that will simplify the interface with the Banner product personnel and payroll system.

The project budget now totals $12.2 million plus contingency, which is 36 percent lower than the total $19.2 million budget the legislature had previously approved to finance this project using Certificates of Participation (COPs). Budget reductions were achieved as a result of several factors: OSSHE campuses have gained experience from previous Banner implementations that will reduce start-up costs; OSSHE was able to hire a senior analyst who is expert on the Banner product to write program modifications; and campuses are utilizing enhanced versions of the hardware and software already in place for the student and financial information systems. In addition, about $500,000 in annual operating costs will be saved by decommissioning the existing mainframe computer in July 1998.

In summary, the HRIS project represents a major milestone for OSSHE on the road to installing a fully integrated administrative information system. The project has been carefully planned, involves active participation by representatives from all OSSHE institutions and the Chancellor's Office, and is proceeding according to schedule and within a revised, lower budget. Staff will keep the Board apprised of the final stages of the implementation effort in the coming months.

(No Board action required)

REPORT ON CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY JANUARY 1 TO JUNE 30, 1997

OSSHE Facilities Profile:
275 Existing Major Academic Buildings
400 Other Major Buildings
Half Over 40 Years of Age
$1.6 Billion Capital Investment


This report provides a summary account of facilities contracting activities conducted under the authority and direction of the Oregon State Board of Higher Education for the period January 1 through June 30, 1997. This report combines two reports that have previously been submitted to the Board: the quarterly Facilities Contracting Report and the semi-annual Capital Construction Report.

The summary information provided below describes the level of capital construction activity and status of projects by campus, starting with projects originally authorized by the Legislature in the 1991-1993 biennium. Since project-specific expenditure limitation expires after five years after Legislative approval, many of these projects have been reauthorized in subsequent biennia. Following the summary information, highlights of construction activity related to campus-specific projects are provided.

Detailed information on all projects is provided in Attachment I, which is included in the supplemental materials to the Board. The attachment includes the amount of unexpended funds for any approved projects still open as of June 10, 1997. The amount of unexpended funds does not take into account any amounts billed by contractors and not paid by that date or any amounts encumbered but not yet paid.

Status of Projects Authorized by the Legislature Prior to 1995

Of projects originally authorized by the Legislature for the biennia from 1991-1993 and 1993-1995, four were completed during this reporting period, two are nearly complete, and three have been canceled by the respective campuses. Expenditure limitations for three projects were canceled and subsequently reauthorized by the Legislature. The University of Oregon's Chemistry Lab Renovation project was the only academic-related facility completed during this time.

The 1995 Legislature authorized 24 campus-specific capital projects for both academic and auxiliary use and eight Systemwide project categories including capital repair/renovation, safety improvements, utilities rehabilitation, and academic modernization. Of the campus-specific projects, five have been completed or largely completed, 11 are under construction, and one gift-funded project is on hold pending completion of a campus fundraising campaign. Expenditure limitations for two projects were canceled and reauthorized during the current legislative session; these were for the Portland State University Urban Center Project and the UO's Law Library Addition, now included in the Campus Development Project.

In March, a biennial report was provided to the Legislature on the capital repair and deferred maintenance projects funded by General Funds and Article XI-G bonds during the 1995-1997 biennium. A copy of a table summarizing projects authorized and their associated fund source limitations (General Fund and Article XI-G Bonds) is included as Attachment II in the supplementary materials to the Board. During this biennium, a total of 130 projects valued at $22,575,000 were undertaken or completed Systemwide.

Highlights of Campus Projects

Eastern Oregon University

Progress continues on the new residential student housing project at EOU. This new facility will house 96 students in 24 suites designed to serve as Living Learning Centers for student integration into University life. Completion is scheduled for mid-July, allowing the University ample time to prepare for the influx of students in the fall.

Oregon Institute of Technology

OIT is moving forward on the Child Care Center, authorized by the Legislature in 1993-1995. This project is financed from Article XI-F(1) bonds to be repaid from the student building fee debt service reserve. Award of the project is expected by the end of July. This new 3,000 square foot facility will be located in an area adjacent to future family housing units on campus.

Oregon State University

OSU received authorization for 11 projects in the 1995-1997 biennium, of which four were for academic-related facilities. Of those projects, three are complete, six are under construction, and two are on hold. The renovation and upgrade to the Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center in Newport is complete. Former Senator Mark Hatfield participated at the Opening Ceremonies on May 17. Another project at Hatfield Marine Science Center, the Dock Facility, is also complete. Both projects were completed on schedule and within budget.

After more than a year of construction activity, OSU's Valley Library project is within budget and on schedule. Completion of the $40 million remodel and five-story, 147,000-square-foot addition is scheduled for September 1998. The final $10 million of Article XI-G bonds for the project, matched by an equal amount of private donations, were issued this spring. The four-story concrete seismic shear wall along the south and part of the east faces of the existing 189,000 square foot building is complete. Window frame and metal panel installation is under way. Mechanical and electrical system installation continues throughout the building. The sixth floor steel structures of the addition are complete, and roofing is in progress.

Design development is completed for the Forest Ecosystem Research Laboratory, and the Contract Manager/General Contractor contract has been awarded. Construction on this project is expected to start in July. The Memorial Union Phase II Renovation project was scheduled for completion this spring; however, the project is behind schedule and the University is attempting to prevent the contractor from incurring further delays on the project. The Valley Football Center Addition project is also under construction and includes a 28,000- square-foot addition to the existing facility and 4,000 square feet of renovation. New gifting is being identified, which will extend the scope and the completion date, but will not require additional spending authorization.

Portland State University

While awaiting legislative approval of the Urban Center project, PSU has secured funding commitments from its public partners to move forward with the first stage of this $29.2 million project. Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (Tri-Met), the City of Portland, and the University have each committed $500,000 to secure a $3,000,000 match by the Federal Transportation Administration for the first stage of the project. These funds will be used to acquire a small parcel of land adjacent to the Mill Street property for site development, to develop the public plaza, and for street improvements. This activity sets the stage for construction of the five-story Urban Center building on the site in the 1998-99 time frame.

The University has several renovation projects and classroom modernization projects under construction. Currently, six academic classrooms are being renovated for Speech, Art, and general purpose programs. In addition, the University is completing electrical engineering improvements at the Fourth Avenue Building (US WEST Facility). Later this summer, the University will relocate electrical control labs and research space from the Portland Center for Advanced Technology building to this facility in accordance with the PSU Master Plan as approved by the Board.

Southern Oregon University

SOU is completing construction on the Family Housing project at the Old Mill Village. This project is funded from the Adult Student Housing 1992 legal settlement. A total of 35 new apartment units are being constructed on land adjacent to the current facility.

With legislative approval for the project, Southern is preparing to launch a major fundraising campaign for the Center for the Visual Arts. This $11.2 million project will add instruction capacity in the Visual Arts, a key academic program area for the University. This project will also replace substandard instruction space currently housed in seven separate facilities with state-of-the-art facilities.

University of Oregon

UO has begun the first phase of the three-phase $36 million Campus Development Project. The Contract Manager/General Contractor agreement has been signed with Hoffman Construction Company, and construction of the new William W. Knight Law Center is expected to begin soon. The second phase of the project involves renovation of the existing Law School, Grayson Hall, to provide additional core academic space for the College of Arts and Sciences. The final phase will include an addition to Gilbert Hall, the College of Business.

Construction has also begun at the Erb Memorial Union building to remodel and upgrade existing student services including food service, dining, and recreation areas. Construction is in process at the Indoor Practice Facility, and is expected to be completed by late December 1997. Work on the second and final phase of the Spencer View family housing replacement project at the former UO Amazon housing site continues. Phase I was completed last fall and included 132 units, a community center, family center, and administrative facilities. Phase II is on schedule and slightly under budget, with completion of an additional 132 units anticipated by September 1997.

Western Oregon University

WOU is moving into the final stages on Phase I of the Werner College Center Remodel and Addition project. During this phase of the project, the student union building received a new entrance and loading dock; a new warehouse was added for the book store; and both the book store and the food service areas were relocated to the second floor for improved student access.

In addition to major projects such as those listed above, many smaller projects and many capital repair/deferred maintenance projects are underway at all the campuses.

(No Board action required)

SEMI-ANNUAL AUDIT REPORT

Staff Report to the Board

The Internal Audit Division's (IAD) Semi-Annual Audit Report January-June 1997, included in the supplemental materials, summarizes audit results from projects completed over the past six months and provides an update on the status of IAD's 1996-97 Audit Plan. Audit results discussed in the report are principally from projects scheduled as part of IAD's 1996-97 OSSHE Risk Assessment Audit Program, including Banner FIS policy compliance, Banner FIS check writing, Banner FIS security and approvals, procurement policies and procedures, facilities contracting policies and procedures, and travel policies and procedures. The report also includes information on IAD's Institutional Consulting Services Program and summarizes other projects and services such as institutional requests for audit services, IAD's audit follow-up program, NCAA intercollegiate athletics reviews, and IAD's liaison with external auditors conducting work within OSSHE.

(No Board action required)

1997-98 INTERNAL AUDIT PLAN

Staff Report to the Board

The Internal Audit Division's (IAD) audit plan for the 1997-98 fiscal year is included in the supplemental materials. This plan incorporates selected best audit practices endorsed by the Institute of Internal Auditors, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and other professional audit organizations. These practices have been integrated by IAD into three core programs designed to help address OSSHE's audit-related needs for the upcoming year: (1) the 1997-98 Risk Assessment Audit Program, which includes departmental audits of critical business functions, information technology audit plans, hazardous waste handling reviews, and contracting authority audits; (2) the Consulting Services Program, which includes provisions for consulting on both campus and Systemwide issues; and (3) the Control Assessment and Training Program, which makes available combined risk assessment and internal control training sessions to campus departments. In addition to these programs, the plan provides for such other projects and services as campuses request audits, audit follow-ups, outsourcing, fraud audits, and liaison for Federal, Oregon Audits Division, and other external audits and reviews.

(No Board action required)

OSSHE PROJECTED ENROLLMENT DEMAND THROUGH 2000-01

In 1990, Oregon institutions of higher education were anticipating a sharp increase in enrollment by the year 2000. Key influencing factors were:

An unprecedented rate of growth in high school graduates, partly as a result of rapid in-migration from California during the late 1980s;

The relative stability of tuition rates and financial aid; and

The proportion of Oregon high school graduates entering OSSHE institutions, which, at the time, was at 20 percent.

In 1991, following the passage of Ballot Measure 5, the enrollment environment changed dramatically:

There were significant reductions in state tax funds, which led to sharp tuition increases and program reductions;

Oregon freshman participation rates fell to 18.5 percent by 1993-94;

A larger share of high school graduates chose to enroll in Oregon community colleges to avoid the higher costs of the State System;

Larger numbers of high school graduates enrolled in colleges outside Oregon; and

A larger proportion of OSSHE students became dependent on financial aid -- increasingly in the form of loans rather than scholarships and grants.

In addition, rates of in-migration from California tapered off, and the anticipated growth in high school graduates, though still significant, was not as high as had been expected in 1990.

However, despite the effects of Measure 5, the State System has made improvements in several areas; and now, in 1997, predictions are for enrollment to surpass the 1990 levels by 1999. OSSHE institutions are preparing to serve the increasing number of Oregon high school graduates -- projected to increase by 25 percent from 1991-92 to 2001-02, and by nine percent from 1996-97. Progress has already been achieved in important areas:

The student body is more diverse -- ethnic minority students were 12.5 percent of total fall enrollment in 1996, compared to nine percent in 1990;

Retention and graduation rates have improved -- six-year graduation rates for students entering as freshmen have increased steadily, from a rate of 48.8 percent for the 1987-88 cohort to a rate of 52.7 percent for the 1989-90 cohort.

An additional boost to the enrollment picture is anticipated as a result of a freeze on the resident undergraduate instruction fee, the first since 1986-87. Nevertheless, the cost of college to students still looms as a major deterrent to full participation in higher education. Financial aid in the form of loans, rather than scholarships and grants, leaves students carrying a heavy debt load when they graduate. Additionally, Oregon must address the current trends of its top high school graduates attending out-of-state colleges and universities.

State System institutions are projected to enroll approximately 64,600 students (base headcount) by fall term 2000, a 9.5 percent increase over the fall 1996 headcount enrollment of 59,001. These projections are the product of an established forecasting method used by Chancellor's Office staff and, perhaps more importantly, numerous conversations and joint review and analysis with campus presidents and their staffs. In the course of those conversations and analyses, common assumptions about each campus' future enrollment were developed, and campus issues, concerns, and new directions were articulated. Those assumptions and campus issues, as well as more detailed data summaries, are contained in a separate report included in the supplemental materials. In addition to projected enrollment numbers by institution, the detailed report includes a summary of features of the enrollment environment in 1990 compared to the present time and a list of strategies or actions that would serve to enlarge the current projections.

It should be emphasized that these projections reflect the collective wisdom about what OSSHE enrollments are likely to be, given current conditions and planned actions. The projections do not necessarily reflect the aspirations of the State System under a different funding situation, nor do they respond adequately to the larger issues of college cost and the level of college enrollment Oregon needs or wishes to support.

(No Board action required)

FOLLOW-UP REVIEWS CONDUCTED IN 1996-97 OF SELECTED PROGRAMS

Staff Report to the Board

In November 1990, the Board approved a policy directing the Office of Academic Affairs to conduct a follow-up review of each degree program or significant new option within an existing degree program approved by the Board since January 1, 1983. The purpose of the follow-up review is to describe the status of new programs five years after their approval for implementation. For each new program, institutions report patterns of student enrollment and degrees granted, availability of resources (faculty, library, facilities), employment opportunities for graduates, and prospects and problems that may affect the program's progress over the next five years.

During the 1996-97 academic year, the following programs, approved by the Board, were reviewed:

Oregon State University
M.A.T. in Teaching and Basic Certification for Elementary and Secondary Teachers

Southern Oregon University
B.A./B.S. in Health and Physical Education

Western Oregon University
B.A. in Theatre Arts
B.A./B.S. in Speech Communication
B.A. in Spanish
B.A./B.S. in Sociology
B.A./B.S. in Political Science
B.A./B.S. in Chemistry

Summaries of the eight program reviews follow.

M.A.T. in Teaching and Basic Certification for Elementary and Secondary Teachers, Oregon State University

The Board authorized Oregon State University (OSU) in October 1990 to offer an instructional program leading to a Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) with a major in teaching. The program represents an extensive overhaul of OSU's long-standing four-year pre-service teacher education programs and was part of a legislatively driven System plan to move most of the campus teacher education programs to fifth year, post-baccalaureate programs. The M.A.T. program is a professional degree program that culminates in both teaching licensure and a master's degree. Students can successfully complete the program in one year (12 months). The program is fully accredited for ten years by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. It is also approved by the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC).

Cohorts of students are admitted to the program each year. The upper limit varies by licensure area and is based on faculty resources. For early childhood/elementary education and counseling (community based counselors) many qualified applicants are not admitted because of resource limitations. Enrollment demands have been strong over the past six years (1991-92: 78 students; 1992-93: 95 students; 1993-94: 84 students; 1994-95: 85 students; 1995-96: 99 students; 1996-97: 75 students). Student credit-hour (SCH) generation follows similar patterns (1991-92: 3,744 SCH; 1992-93: 4,560 SCH; 1993-94: 4,032 SCH; 1994-95: 4,080 SCH; 1995-96: 4,752 SCH; 1996-97: 3,600 SCH). A survey of 1994 graduates of teacher education programs at Oregon State University was conducted to determine graduates' attitudes toward how well OSU had prepared them for specific tasks associated with their teaching careers. Results of the survey indicated that graduates believed they were prepared to perform tasks associated with: (1) planning for instruction, (2) establishing a classroom climate conducive to learning, (3) implementing plans for instruction, and (4) evaluating pupil achievement and improving instruction. A survey of supervisors of these graduates revealed similar high levels of perceived preparation of the graduates.

The need for trained professional educators in Oregon is increasing, particularly in the areas of early childhood and elementary education, mathematics, and special needs population. Therefore, it is expected that the M.A.T. program will continue to have strong enrollment demands. Changes in TSPC rules and regulations governing teacher licensure will affect future directions of the program. These changes have been discussed extensively in recent years by the Joint Boards of Education and in the 1997 legislative session. New programs will need to be created and approved by the Commission by 1999. Faculty are currently working on new program designs. A major change most likely will be the separation of licensure from degree with recommendation for licensure being made at the end of the pre-service program and degree options following at a later time.


B.A./B.S. in Health and Physical Education, Southern Oregon University

In May 1990, the Board authorized Southern Oregon University (SOU) to offer an instructional program leading to a B.A./B.S. degree with a major in Health and Physical Education. This program was needed to accommodate changes in the teacher education program in 1989 requiring an academic major other than education for all prospective teachers. The budget for the Department of Health and Physical Education is $709,338, about 98 percent of which is faculty and staff salaries. The program used existing resources and courses and no additional faculty were needed to implement the restructured program. Library resources, facilities, and basic equipment needed are adequate. As part of the campus-wide Degree Program Review of the department in 1993-94, a three-person team of external visitors noted the need for laboratory equipment associated with exercise physiology (tank for hydrostatic weighing).

Although the program originally offered five options in majors, budget constraints reduced these to two degree options in Health Promotion and Fitness Management and Athletic Training. Enrollment in these programs has increased steadily. In fall 1995, 178 students were majoring in health and physical education (compared to 120 in fall 1991). Since its implementation in fall 1991, 122 baccalaureates have been granted. Annual degree production has increased from 11 graduates in 1990-91 to 31 graduates in 1995-96.The 1990 proposal anticipated 25 graduates per year.

Of more than 100 graduates, 28 percent were admitted to graduate school to further their education, almost 60 percent are employed in the field (health, fitness, coaching, athletic training, teaching), and 13 percent are doing other things (e.g., military service, travel, working outside the major). In fall 1996, the department surveyed students to find out their level of satisfaction with the program. Students were most satisfied with advising, knowledge, and expertise of the faculty, helpfulness of faculty, opportunities to develop critical thinking abilities, and the capstone experience. Students were less satisfied with opportunities to develop computation and computer skills and oral communication skills.

The program is expected to remain a strong and viable program at Southern Oregon University. The current growth is expected to plateau in the near future and stabilize at between 30-35 graduates per year. There is no plan for expanding the program beyond the two options in Athletic Training and Health Promotion/Fitness Management. The department would like to add a 1.0 FTE regular faculty position in exercise science, nutrition, adaptives, and stress management by replacing an adjunct faculty member (.72 FTE) as funds become available.

B.A. in Theatre Arts, Western Oregon University
The Board authorized WOU to offer a new instructional program leading to a B.A. degree in Theatre Arts in 1990. Theatre Arts has been in place for 25 years through teacher education. With the move away from a single-purpose teacher education institution, WOU decided the program was more appropriately situated with liberal arts. This program broadens the fine and liberal arts programming. WOU indicated it would use existing faculty resources (4.0 FTE) and operate at the current level of expenditures. WOU projected that 15 to 25 students would be pursuing this major at any given time and estimated 15 to 20 graduates over a five-year period.

WOU is offering the program with existing resources. The 1996-97 budget was $199,143, 96 percent of which covers faculty and support staff salaries and benefits.

For 1995-96, 13 students are pursuing a major and 22 are pursuing a minor in Theatre Arts. In five years, WOU has awarded six baccalaureates in Theatre Arts. These graduates have found employment as technical directors in colleges and theater teachers in community colleges and Oregon high schools. Because theatre arts is part of the Liberal Arts Core Curriculum, WOU is able to offer a small Theatre Arts program at a minimal added cost. The trend in student credit-hour production in Theatre Arts has fluctuated less than one percent in five years (3,433 in 1991-92 compared to 3,460 in 1995-96).

To boost majors in this program, recruitment efforts have included more visitations to Oregon high schools and community colleges. WOU hosted the Oregon Thespian Conference in spring 1997. WOU plans to fill a tenure-track faculty position vacated by the death of a faculty member.

B.A./B.S. in Speech Communication, Western Oregon University
The Board authorized WOU to offer a new instructional program leading to a B.A./B.S. degree in Speech Communication in 1991. The addition of this program was part of a plan to implement five new undergraduate degrees at WOU over a two-year period, which broadens the programming in "mainstream" liberal arts consistent with WOU's transition from a teacher education college to a more comprehensive liberal arts college. WOU currently has four full-time (4.0 FTE) and two part-time lecturers (.75 FTE) assigned to Speech Communication. WOU estimated that 15 to 20 students would enroll as majors each year. The maximum program size with current staffing is 50 students. WOU is offering the program with existing resources. The 1996-97 budget was $227,024, 96 percent of which covers faculty and support staff salaries and benefits.

For 1995-96, 61 students are pursuing a major and ten are pursuing a minor in Speech Communication. In five years, WOU has awarded 55 baccalaureates in Speech Communication. In the last two academic years, WOU awarded more than 70 percent of these degrees. WOU graduates in Speech Communication have found employment in a variety of fields (e.g., public relations, teacher, marketing, legislative assistant) and some are furthering their education in graduate and professional schools on the West Coast. Student credit-hour production in this program has increased 17.3 percent (3,639 in 1991-92 compared to 4,272 in 1995-96). Enrollment growth is strong and the internship program is adding new host organizations. Due to program growth, WOU plans to request a new faculty position. WOU will hire a faculty member to fill a position vacated by retirement in June 1996.

B.A. in Spanish, Western Oregon University
The Board authorized WOU to offer a new instructional program leading to a B.A. degree in Spanish in 1991. The addition of this program was part of a plan to implement five new undergraduate degrees at WOU over a two-year period, which broadens the programming in "mainstream" liberal arts consistent with WOU's transition from a teacher education college to a more comprehensive liberal arts college. The major was needed to help better serve the growing Hispanic community in the region in both the private and public sectors. WOU estimated that 30 students would enroll as majors each year and 20 students will graduate each year. The maximum program size is 50 students. WOU is offering the program with existing resources. The 1996-97 budget was $290,733, 97 percent of which covers faculty and support staff salaries and benefits.

For Spanish, 3.0 FTE faculty hold tenure-track positions and 4.98 FTE hold appointments as lecturers. For 1995-96, 26 students are pursuing a major and 37 are pursuing a minor in Spanish. Slightly more than 40 WOU students have participated in OSSHE's Study Abroad Program in Ecuador (30 students) and Mexico (12 students) over the last six academic years. WOU has awarded 25 baccalaureates in Spanish since 1991-92. WOU graduates in Spanish have found employment primarily in teaching and some are furthering their education in graduate and professional schools on the West Coast. Student credit-hour production in this program has increased 67.8 percent (3,991 in 1991-92 compared to 6,698 in 1995-96).

The dramatic increase in student credit-hour production in Spanish stems from WOU's location in an area with a large Hispanic population (25 percent), the importance of Mexico and its trade agreements with the United States, the current need in Oregon for a bilingual and culturally sensitive workforce, and rise in related academic programs, such as International Studies and Latin American Studies. It is anticipated that as demand increases, faculty FTE will need to increase accordingly.

B.A./B.S. in Sociology,Western Oregon University
The Board authorized WOU to offer a new instructional program leading to a B.A./B.S. degree in Sociology in 1991. The addition of this program was part of a plan to implement five new undergraduate degrees at WOU over a two-year period, which broadens the programming in liberal arts consistent with WOU's transition from a teacher education college to a more comprehensive liberal arts college. Sociology is considered one of the cornerstone disciplines for a traditional liberal arts course of study. WOU currently has 3.0 FTE faculty who are sociologists. WOU estimated that 10 to 15 students would enroll as majors each year. The maximum program size with current staffing is 40 to 50 majors WOU is offering the program with existing resources. The 1996-97 budget was $153,415, 96 percent of which covers faculty and support staff salaries and benefits.

For 1995-96, 29 students are pursuing a major and 42 are pursuing a minor in Sociology. In five years, WOU has awarded 25 baccalaureates in Sociology. These graduates have found employment with social service agencies, and in labor relations and law enforcement fields. Several are furthering their education in graduate school majoring in social work. Student credit-hour production in Sociology has increased 46.6 percent (3,102 in 1991-92 compared to 4,549 in 1995-96).

Most sociology courses are fully enrolled and some have waiting lists. Sociology has a large number of minors, the second highest among all social science disciplines offered at WOU. WOU expects demand for sociology courses to continue to be strong.

B.A./B.S. in Political Science, Western Oregon University
The Board authorized WOU to offer a new instructional program leading to a B.A./B.S. degree in Political Science in 1992. The addition of this program was part of a plan to implement five new undergraduate degrees at WOU over a two-year period, which broadens the programming in "mainstream" liberal arts consistent with WOU's transition from a teacher education college to a more comprehensive liberal arts college. WOU had three full-time faculty in Political Science and the Board authorized an additional 1.0 FTE tenure-track assistant professor position. No new costs were needed to implement the program beyond the reallocation of one tenure-track assistant professor. WOU estimated that 25 to 30 students would enroll as majors by the fourth year. The maximum program size with staffing is 75 majors. The 1996-97 budget was $173,008, 96 percent of which covers faculty and support staff salaries and benefits.

For 1995-96, ten students are pursuing a major and 45 are pursuing a minor in Political Science. Over four academic years, WOU has awarded 20 baccalaureates in Political Science. WOU graduates in Political Science have found employment in a variety of fields (e.g., legislative assistant, private business) and some are furthering their education in law school. Student credit-hour production in this program has increased 8.9 percent (2,801 in 1991-92 compared to 3,051 in 1995-96). Enrollment growth is slow but steady. There are no immediate plans to increase faculty FTE.

B.A./B.S. in Chemistry,Western Oregon University
The Board authorized WOU to offer a new instructional program leading to a B.A./B.S. degree in Chemistry in 1992. The addition of this program was part of a plan to implement five new undergraduate degrees at WOU over a two year-period, which broadens the programming in "mainstream" liberal arts consistent with WOU's transition from a teacher education college to a more comprehensive liberal arts college. WOU had three full-time faculty in Chemistry. The Board authorized an additional 1.0 FTE tenure-track assistant professor. WOU estimated that 10 to 15 students would enroll as Chemistry majors. The maximum program size with staffing is 40 majors.

WOU is offering the program with existing resources. The 1996-97 budget was $205,165, 75 percent of which covers 4.0 FTE faculty and 1.33 FTE clerical and laboratory support staff salaries and benefits.

For 1995-96, 12 students are pursuing a major and 20 are pursuing a minor in Chemistry. Over four academic years, WOU has awarded eight baccalaureates in Chemistry. WOU graduates in Chemistry have found employment in a variety of fields (e.g., chemistry teacher, brewing chemist, forensic chemist) and some are furthering their education in graduate school. Student credit-hour production in this program has increased 32.7 percent (1,392 in 1991-92 compared to 1,847 in 1995-96). Successful grant applications to the National Science Foundation have resulted in laboratory equipment purchases needed to support the program.

Both the number of Chemistry majors and students electing to take upper-division chemistry courses have increased. To meet future demands, approval for additional faculty may be sought to allow more student research opportunities.

(No Board action required)

STATUS OF THE WESTERN UNDERGRADUATE EXCHANGE PROGRAM

Staff Report

The following is the annual report of Oregon's experience with the Western Undergraduate Exchange Program (WUE) established by the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) in 1988. In 1989, the Oregon State Board of Higher Education approved a staff recommendation for OSSHE institutions to begin participating in WUE.

The goals of WUE are to increase student access and choice while enhancing the efficient use of educational resources among the western states. The basic assumptions underlying WUE are: (1) that most institutions have some programs that can accommodate additional students at little or no additional cost, and (2) that additional nonresident students can be attracted to those programs by offering a tuition discount.

Institutions charge nonresident WUE students 150 percent of resident tuition if they apply and are admitted to one of the designated WUE programs. WUE tuition is significantly less than nonresident tuition at all participating institutions.

Participating institutions specify which programs will be available to WUE students and admit WUE students to those programs on a space-available basis. Institutions are under no obligation to admit WUE students.

WUE has proven to be a popular program with students and parents in all of the participating states. Across all participating states, WUE enrollments have increased dramatically over the life of the program, increasing from 3,931 students in 1990-91 to 7,353 students in 1996-97, an increase of 87 percent. Oregon students enrolling in WUE programs in participating states have increased from 288 students in 1990-91 to 689 students in 1996-97, an increase of 139 percent. However, since 1994-95, the flow of Oregon students to other WUE states has declined by 12 percent. WUE students from other states enrolling in Oregon institutions increased from 62 in 1990-91 to 395 in 1996-97, an increase of 537 percent. And in one year alone, from 1995-96 to 1996-97, the number of WUE students enrolling in Oregon institutions increased by 25 percent. Overall, Oregon currently has a net outflow of 294 students under the WUE program. Almost 75 percent of Oregon students enrolled under the WUE program attend colleges in Idaho, Montana, and Nevada. Enrollment in Nevada colleges has increased 123 percent since 1994-95.

The following tables reflect a history of Oregon WUE enrollments since 1990-91.
Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE) Enrollment History
Students from WUE States Enrolled at Oregon Institutions
Institution 1990-91 1991-92 1992-93 1993-94 1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

Eastern Oregon University N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Oregon Institute of Technology 32 33 55 58 67 70 55
Oregon State University 9 21 34 46 79 112 180
Portland State University 3 4 3 2 5 6 7
Southern Oregon University 7 14 36 37 34 66 87
University of Oregon 11 16 28 52 84 56 63
Western Oregon University 0 0 0 0 2 3 3
TOTALS 62 88 156 195 271

313

395
% Change 42% 77% 25% 39%

15%

26%

Oregon Students Enrolled at Institutions in WUE States*
State 1990-91 1991-92 1992-93 1993-94 1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

Alaska 1 15 13 27 25 34 14
Colorado 10 13 17 28 39 50 55
Hawaii 4 3 1 3 6 4 11
Idaho 147 352 285 305 327 288 226
Minnesota 12 15 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Montana 87 131 247 269 215 140 114
Nevada 0 0 13 62 73 135 163
New Mexico 1 2 4 6 5 4 4
North Dakota 11 18 19 16 37 34 29
South Dakota 2 8 8 12 12 17 19
Utah 7 6 17 20 32 31 34
Wyoming 6 5 11 17 13 27 20
TOTALS 288 568 635 765 784 764 689
% Change 97% 12% 20% 25% -3% -10%

*Arizona, California, and Washington do not participate in WUE.

Board guidelines for OSSHE participation in WUE require the following:

A WUE program must be able to accommodate a limited number of additional students without requiring additional resources;

WUE admissions must be on a space-available basis and limited to the programs approved for WUE participation by the State System Office of Academic Affairs;

Nonresident students previously or currently enrolled at OSSHE institutions will not be allowed to convert to WUE status;

WUE students who change majors to a non-WUE program will lose their WUE status;

WUE students enrolled in accordance with the above guidelines shall continue to be eligible for the WUE tuition rate for the duration of their undergraduate academic program, even if that program is removed from the approved list; and

Institutions participating in WUE are required to provide an annual report to the State System Office of Academic Affairs reflecting the number of WUE students enrolled by program, together with the students' states of origin.

The number of WUE students coming into the state is limited by the programs in which WUE students may enroll. The State System has adhered to the original WUE policy of maximizing state resources by attracting additional students to targeted programs that can accommodate additional students at no additional cost and with no adverse effect on access for residents. In contrast, some other states have allowed their institutions to make most or all of their programs available to WUE students.

In sum, the WUE program continues to provide Oregonians with competitively priced out-of-state higher education alternatives. For example, in 1996-97, the average OSSHE resident tuition rate of $3,269 was lower than the WUE tuition rate of $3,742 at the University of Montana, but considerably higher than the WUE tuition rate of $2,644 at the University of Idaho. The net outflow of students represents a potential loss of enrollment for OSSHE institutions, particularly the large losses to institutions in Idaho, Montana, and Nevada. However, it should be noted that fewer Oregon students elected to attend college in Montana and Idaho this past academic year than in the previous year. Enrollment in Nevada institutions continues to increase.

(No Board action required)