REPORT OF THE TASK FORCE ON GRADUATE/ PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION & RESEARCH

Introduction

In the summer and early fall of 1995, in response to concerns voiced by the graduate deans of the three OSSHE universities regarding escalating graduate tuition, the "Graduate Education and Research 2010 Advisory Panel" was formed by the Chancellor. This group was charged with conducting a thorough examination of the status of OSSHE graduate education; not since 1978 had such a comprehensive effort been launched. The Advisory Panel's work had just begun when the State Board of Higher Education, in December, commenced a comprehensive strategic planning effort. These two processes were merged and the Advisory Panel was restructured as the "Board Task Force on Graduate Education and Research" -- one of four study and advisory groups assembled in Phase I of the planning process. The task force was directed to furnish the Board with a "situational analysis" of graduate education and research and to identify relevant issues which then might be used as input to future stages of the planning process. Along with the other task forces, the Graduate/Professional Education and Research Task Force presented relevant issues to the Board in April 1996. Following the April Board meeting, the task force continued working on its comprehensive report, the results of which are presented in summary today. The completed report will present a comprehensive review of graduate education, a more modest review of research within OSSHE, and will identify issues pertinent to: institutional mission, academic programs, students, faculty, and research.

Graduate/Professional Education and Research

Programs. Graduate education consists of advanced study beyond the baccalaureate. The report addresses graduate education primarily in terms of master's- and doctoral-degree programs, but also includes individual courses and post-baccalaureate certificate programs. Graduate programs are both research focused (preparing scholars/researchers, emphasizing individual creativity and original research efforts) and professionally oriented (providing preparation for advanced levels of professional practice). Doctoral education, normally requiring evidence of original creativity (research), is characterized by a mentoring relationship between faculty member and student, and student programs that are tailored to individual graduate student needs. Graduate education supports other educational services, including undergraduate education (graduate students are utilized in the teaching of undergraduates and are at the forefront of producing new knowledge that is taught to undergraduates) as well as K-12 education (K-12 teachers and administrators commonly are educated not only at the bachelor's-degree level but at the master's and doctorate levels). Also, virtually every aspect of contemporary technological society is affected by graduate education and research. Benefits to the individual include substantially enhanced career earnings commensurate with the degree earned; societal benefits include the expansion of local and regional economies by enhancing the quality of the workforce and through technology transfer. Beyond economic measures, there are many practical contributions for the common good in new knowledge created in such diverse fields as agriculture, medicine, music, art, literature, science, ecology, engineering, and economics.

High-quality graduate programs enable universities to attract and retain exceptional faculty: they directly and indirectly enrich undergraduate programs. Graduate programs serve as a base for the strong research capabilities of our universities. Of all the levels of education, it is at the graduate level that the United States is clearly the global leader. U.S. colleges and universities serve as a world-class model, attracting talent from countries around the world as well as growing numbers of American students. Within a context of undisputed national quality and accomplishment in both advanced education and research, Oregonians can be proud of their state universities which have strong reputations at home and abroad. The OSSHE institutions are even more remarkable given the historically low level of public funding provided to them.

In OSSHE, as elsewhere, graduate courses and programs are now delivered to students in both traditional (classroom lecture and discussion) and nontraditional (e.g., video, web-based) modes. OSSHE offers a total of 394 full-degree programs (master's, doctoral, and professional) with most of this activity taking place at the three universities: University of Oregon (UO, a liberal arts and sciences university offering master's, professional, and doctoral programs), Oregon State University (OSU, a land- and sea-grant institution offering master's, professional, and doctoral programs) and Portland State University (PSU, an urban university offering liberal arts and sciences study as well as a preponderance of master's-level professional programs). Additional graduate education, primarily master's programs in education, occurs at the regional colleges: Western Oregon State College (WOSC), Southern Oregon State College (SOSC), and Eastern Oregon State College (EOSC). In fall 1995, Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) implemented its first master's program. The Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU), an affiliated university, offers master's, professional, and doctoral programs in specialized, health-related fields.

Faculty. Of the 2,366 full-time instructional faculty in the State System, almost 80 percent are employed at the three university campuses (UO, 675; OSU, 773; PSU, 412). Virtually all of the university faculty are engaged in both graduate and undergraduate education. Seventy-two percent of the universities' faculty members are tenured. Seventy percent of full-time members are male, and 7.6 percent (182 total) are from racial/ethnic minority groups.

The quality and expertise of these faculty are the key to graduate program quality. At the universities, graduate faculty are selected on the basis of academic training, experience, demonstrated potential for creative work and scholarly research, and evidence of skills essential to directing and supervising graduate students in their pursuit of advanced knowledge. In addition to the full-time faculty, institutions often use external experts as adjunct faculty to enhance graduate capacity and provide different perspectives in particular fields of study.

Students. In 1994-95, of the 12,258 OSSHE graduate students, 50.4 percent were women, most (52.7 percent) were older than 30 years of age, and 65.7 percent were Caucasian. The majority pursued full-time study (68 percent of all master's and 78 percent of all doctoral students). And about 15 percent were from 114 other countries, reflecting the esteem in which OSSHE graduate programs are held internationally. Once enrolled, most graduate students (84 percent) are classified as Oregon residents (for fee purposes nearly all students on teaching or research assistantship appointments are considered to be residents). Student demographics differ from one institution to another. For example, PSU has a markedly older and more part-time graduate student cohort population than do UO and OSU.

Graduate education is expensive. OSSHE tuition has risen dramatically in recent times: 42 percent for residents and 51 percent for nonresidents in the last four years. Graduate students finance their education from university sources (teaching and research assistantships), savings accounts, family resources, off-campus employment, and student loans. The level of debt incurred for students is sometimes massive in nature, often as much as $20,000 or more, even at the master's level. The average student debt for a veterinary medicine graduate at OSU is twice this figure.

Graduate enrollments and degrees awarded vary by institution. For example, in 1994-95:

PSU graduated 855 students with master's degrees, while OSU graduated 669 and UO 796.

Master's degrees in education accounted for a significant portion of all master's degrees: 28 percent (243) of PSU master's, 28 percent (188) of OSU master's, and 22 percent (173) of UO master's.

Of the 188 doctorates produced at OSU, 31 percent were in the physical and biological sciences, 16 percent in education, 13 percent in engineering, and 11 percent in conservation/natural resources.

At UO, 22 percent of the 192 doctorates were in education, 21 percent in the physical and biological sciences, and 15 percent in the social sciences.

At PSU, 33 percent of the 30 doctorates were in education, 27 percent in systems science, and 20 percent in social sciences (public affairs).

WOSC graduated 173 with master's degrees, SOSC graduated 103 with master's degrees, and EOSC graduated 27. Most of these master's degrees were in education: WOSC, 81 percent; SOSC, 50 percent; EOSC, 100 percent.

OHSU produced 82 master's degrees and 20 Ph.D.s, in addition to the 87 medical and 68 dental professional doctoral degrees awarded.

Among the professional degrees awarded, UO graduated 133 in law and OSU graduated 33 in veterinary medicine.

Research. Universities are in the knowledge business -- its discovery, integration, synthesis, application, and dissemination. Correspondingly, the work of faculty is diverse in nature and generally involves teaching, research, and service. Effort expended in any one area tends to support the others. A faculty member involved in cutting-edge research strengthens the quality of his or her teaching in both undergraduate and graduate classrooms in content and methods. Research equipment purchased with grant and contract funds is often made available for laboratory and classroom use by students.

Faculty at Oregon's public higher education institutions are recipients of many research grants from the federal government, foundations, and private interests, which further the development and creation of knowledge and its application. In 1994-95, the total expenditures at OSSHE institutions from gift, grants, and contracts amounted to $280 million, demonstrating the productivity of OSSHE faculty as researchers. In fact, Oregon faculty ranked fourth highest among all 50 states in federal dollars per faculty member (at public, four-year colleges and universities). In some disciplines this federal financial support is available to conduct research of widespread interest (such as in the physical and biological sciences, medicine, and engineering), whereas in other fields (e.g., humanities, social science, education) the external support for research is much more limited. When compared to that of most other states, state support of research and of the necessary infrastructure at Oregon's public universities has been, at best, modest. And by any standard, the investment in research by the private sector in Oregon is very limited.

Despite the substantial investment in research by the federal government historically, such support is expected to decline. In an effort to balance the federal budget, Congress has mandated that federal research and development funding decrease from $34 billion in fiscal year 1995 to an estimated $28 billion in 2002. Consequently, the gifts, grants, and contracts that support research at OSSHE institutions are expected to shrink.

Issues

The work of the task force has surfaced many issues that must be addressed to maintain and enhance graduate education and research in OSSHE. Many of these issues involve both graduate and undergraduate education, particularly with reference to faculty support and to institutional infrastructure. The issues, discussed briefly below, generally relate to quality, cost/price, and access.

Faculty. A high-quality faculty is absolutely essential to first-rate graduate/professional education and competitive research programs. This is a major issue in Oregon's environment of low salaries and a deteriorating infrastructure (facilities, equipment, and other support).

Students. Attracting the best-qualified students to OSSHE graduate programs is an issue. Limited resources put OSSHE institutions at a competitive disadvantage in recruiting such students. Other issues pertaining to a healthy graduate student body include ethnic and gender diversity and balance, student indebtedness, time to degree and retention, high tuition, changing job prospects, and an increased demand in the workplace for advanced degrees.

Programs. Program issues are not those of duplication but of quality, distribution -- especially with respect to the greater Portland area and to remote areas of the state -- critical mass, and demand. Issues include the need for program broadening to prepare students for career changes, recognition of the value of nonwork-related programs, need for nondegree-related courses, strategies for maximizing and deploying scarce programmatic resources, delineation of OSSHE-wide criteria/standards, and review mechanisms for quality assurance, program value to society, and effects on undergraduate education.

Infrastructure. Adequate infrastructural support for faculty, students, and programs is critical. Inadequate, and/or deteriorating libraries, computers, equipment, and facilities undermine the ability to develop and maintain high-quality graduate and research programs.

Access. At issue with regard to access is the availability of programs geographically and temporally, and the affordability of such programs to the student. Are courses and programs offered when and where students need them, in formats that attract them, and at a price they can afford?

Cost/Price. Major issues include needed investments to move targeted programs from "good" to "great" quality, escalating costs of new programs and their required supporting infrastructure, high tuition, and diminishing federal and state support for graduate education and research. If high-quality graduate education and the research vital to those programs and to the state's economy are to be developed and maintained, cost/price issues must be resolved.

Conclusion

High-quality graduate education and research are essential to the vital and well-balanced educational effort within OSSHE. Although graduate education serves as a model of student-focused education, it can be improved. Time to degree can be shortened; the seams between undergraduate/graduate career can be erased; new modes of delivery can be developed; and programs can be broadened. Regardless of what improvements are made, it is clear that graduate education will be increasingly important as a base for other elements of learning and development systems.

(No Board action required)

SALE OF PROPERTY TO OREGON DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, OSU

Staff Report to the Board

The Oregon Department of Transportation has made a request to purchase a small parcel of land on the OSU Eastern Oregon Agriculture Research Center, Section 5 Station. The deeding of the land (approximately 7,425 square feet, or .17 acres) is required to allow for improvements to the highway including the construction of a new bridge. OSU officials have indicated that the new bridge will benefit the station because potential flooding will be diminished. The Oregon Department of Transportation has determined the value of the land to be $250, based upon recent land appraisals in the adjacent area. OSU officials have indicated their concurrence for the sale of this small parcel of land.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends that the Office of Finance and Administration be authorized to sell the 7,425-square-foot parcel to the Oregon Department of Transportation.

BOARD ACTION:

SALE OF PROPERTY TO OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE, OSU

Staff Report to the Board

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has made a request to purchase a small parcel of land on the OSU Malheur Experiment Station property. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) owns a small parcel of land that is surrounded on three sides by the Malheur Experiment Station property. The deeding of the land (approximately 7,000 square feet, or .16 acres) would allow ODFW to expand their facilities to meet their needs. OSU officials have indicated that the transfer of the small parcel will have no negative effects on current or future operations of the station. The $850 value was determined by an appraisal. OSU officials have indicated their concurrence for the sale of this small parcel of land.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends that the Office of Finance and Administration be authorized to sell the 7,000-square-foot parcel to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

BOARD ACTION:

WOSC MISSION STATEMENT

Staff Report to the Board

The Board has general powers to assign missions and roles for the institutions under its jurisdiction. The Oregon Revised Statute states that:

"...the State Board of Higher Education, for each institution, division and department under its control, shall: supervise the general course of instruction therein, and the research, extension, educational and other activities thereof." [ORS 351.070(2)(a)]

Since fall 1995, WOSC has been involved in an extensive planning effort. An initial part of the process was a review of the mission assigned to WOSC by the Board in 1987 and subsequent revision of the mission to more accurately reflect the current and future focus of the College.

The proposed mission statement follows:

"Western Oregon State College provides a comprehensive higher education experience, including teaching and research activities, personal growth and cultural opportunities, and public service. Campus-based, outreach, and continuing education programs prepare students to make personal and professional contributions to the economy, culture, and society of Oregon, the nation, and the world.

"Undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education programs in the School of Education and the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences are distinguished by close student, faculty, and staff interaction; interdisciplinary teaching; undergraduate research opportunities; and internships with business and the public sector. A core curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences provides the foundation for excellence in degree programs in creative arts, natural sciences, mathematics, humanities, and social sciences, as well as in professional degree programs in teacher education, business, computer science, criminal justice, and fire services administration.

"National leadership in research and policy development is provided through the Division of Teaching Research, the Regional Resource Center on Deafness, and the National Clearinghouse for Deaf-Blindness.

"Located near Oregon's capital, Salem, Western provides specialized preparation in public service careers and fosters partnerships with state and local governments. The campus-based Oregon Military Academy and Oregon Public Service Academy are models for the mutually beneficial sharing of facilities and support services.

"Cultural offerings, athletic programs, and educational resources enhance campus life and enrich the lives of mid-Willamette Valley residents. Responding to the challenges Oregonians face in career changes, life transitions, and adapting to new technologies, Western provides lifelong learning and professional growth opportunities.

"Western Oregon State College has had a tradition of excellence since 1856. This tradition, built on strength and leadership in academic programs, student life programs, and support services, will continue to meet the challenges and opportunities of public higher education in Oregon.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff supports President Betty Youngblood's request for Board approval of WOSC's Mission Statement, which has been approved by the faculty and staff of WOSC.

BOARD ACTION:

INSTITUTION MISSIONS

Staff Report to the Board

The Board has general powers to assign missions and roles for the institutions under its jurisdiction. The Oregon Revised Statute states that:

"...the State Board of Higher Education, for each institution, division and department under its control, shall: supervise the general course of instruction therein, and the research, extension, educational and other activities thereof." [ORS 351.070(2)(a)]

As the Board's strategic planning effort has progressed, the System institutions have been engaged in a parallel process. Many have reviewed their mission statements and have refined or changed them. Additionally, some have added further defining vision statements.

For the Board's information, the institution mission statements follow. Indications have been made as to whether the statement currently in use has been approved by the Board and, if so, when that approval occurred. Those that have not been approved will be brought to the Board for action within the next several months.

Eastern Oregon State College

Eastern Oregon State College's mission is to serve the educational, social, cultural, and economic needs of the ten eastern-most counties of Oregon through high-quality programs of instruction, research, and service.

(Board approved 1987)

Oregon Institute of Technology

The mission of Oregon Institute of Technology, the only institute of technology in the Oregon State System of Higher Education, is to provide degree programs in the applied technologies that will prepare students to become effective participants in their professional, public, and international communities. Therefore, Oregon Institute of Technology is committed to the following objectives:

(Board approved 2/92)

Oregon State University

Oregon State University serves the people of Oregon, the nation, and the world through education, research, and service.

Oregon State extends its programs throughout the world and is committed to providing access and educational opportunities to minorities and to challenged and disadvantaged students.

Oregon State has an inherent commitment to provide a comprehensive array of high-quality educational programs in the sciences, liberal arts, and selected professions. The University encourages students, both on and off campus, to develop an enriched awareness of themselves and their global environment.

Through research, Oregon State extends the frontiers of knowledge in the sciences, liberal arts, and in all aspects of natural, human, and economic resources. Oregon State contributes to the intellectual development and the economic and technological advancement of humankind.

As a Land Grant, Sea Grant, and Space Grant university, Oregon State has a special responsibility for education and research enabling the people of Oregon and the world to develop and utilize human, land, atmospheric, and oceanic resources. Unique programs of public service throughout Oregon supplement campus-based university teaching and research.

(Slight modification from Board approved 9/87)

Portland State University

The mission of Portland State University is to enhance the intellectual, social, cultural, and economic qualities of urban life by providing access throughout the life span to a quality liberal education for undergraduates and an appropriate array of professional and graduate programs, especially relevant to the metropolitan area. The University will promote actively the development of a network of educational institutions that will serve the community and will conduct research and community service to support a high-quality educational environment and reflect issues important to the metropolitan region.

(Board approved 9/91)

Southern Oregon State College

Southern Oregon State is distinctive in the State System of Higher Education in being Oregon's principal small public institution with a primary mission of providing excellent and thorough instruction in the liberal arts and sciences. These complement the College's selected professional and graduate programs. The campus combines many of the best features of both the private and public college: small enrollment classes; teachers who know and work directly with their students; and a faculty and staff fully committed to education, both in and beyond the classroom, on and off campus. Southern Oregon State is designated as a center of excellence in the fine and performing arts.

The College principally serves students from Southern Oregon, but increasingly attracts them from the West and Northwest. It brings students of all ages together in traditional undergraduate programs, education for the professions, graduate education, and lifelong learning programs. Through the College's general education curriculum, students share in a common intellectual enterprise, mastering specific information and applying critical thinking skills they have learned in community and international settings. Students are encouraged to engage in significant undergraduate research. They also become technologically literate, learn to communicate clearly and effectively, and explore ethical issues and define social and personal values.

SIX ELEMENTS ARE CENTRAL TO THIS MISSION:

(not approved)

University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is a comprehensive research university that serves its students and the people of Oregon, the nation, and the world through the creation and transfer of knowledge in the liberal arts, the natural and social sciences, and the professions. The University is a community of scholars dedicated to the highest standards of academic inquiry, learning, and service. Recognizing that knowledge is the fundamental wealth of civilization, the University strives to enrich the public that sustains it through:

(not approved)

(No Board action required)

SUMMARY OF FACILITIES CONTRACTING ACTIVITIES

PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANT AGREEMENTS

Autzen Skysuite Window Renovation, UO

An agreement was negotiated with Morris, Redden, Affolter & West Architects, for architectural services at the University of Oregon. Financing will be provided from athletic funds.

Autzen Stadium Site Development, UO

An agreement was negotiated with WBGS Architecture & Planning, PC, for architectural planning services at the University of Oregon. Financing will be provided from athletic and gift funds.

Bean Residence Hall Complex Repairs, UO

An agreement was negotiated with Robertson/Sherwood/Architects, PC, for architectural and planning services at the University of Oregon. Financing will be provided from housing reserves.

Feasibility Study for Student Housing and Grade School, PSU

An agreement was negotiated with Boora Architect, Inc., for professional services at Portland State University. Financing will be provided by Portland Public Schools and College Housing Northwest.

HVAC and Fume Hood Evaluation, Science Building One, PSU

An agreement was negotiated with Chris Billings & Associates for professional services at Portland State University. Financing will be provided from state funds.

HVAC and Fume Hood Evaluation, Science Building Two, PSU

An agreement was negotiated with Chris Billings & Associates for professional services at Portland State University. Financing will be provided from state funds.

Intercollegiate Athletics Indoor Practice Facility, UO

An agreement was negotiated with David J. Pedersen & Associates, Inc., for professional services at the University of Oregon. Financing will be provided from gift funds.

Intercollegiate Athletics Indoor Practice Facility, UO

An agreement was negotiated with Access Engineering for professional engineering services at the University of Oregon. Financing will be provided from gift funds.

School of Architecture and Allied Arts, UO

An agreement was negotiated with Kampe Associated, Inc., for topographic mapping services at the University of Oregon. Financing will be provided from state funds.

School of Education Space Planning, PSU

An agreement was negotiated with WAM Architecture for professional services at Portland State University. Financing will be provided from state funds.

Silica Monitoring at Arts Building, UO

An agreement was negotiated with IHS Consulting for industrial consulting services at the University of Oregon. Financing will be provided from state funds.

Urban Center Project, PSU

An agreement was negotiated with Thomas Hacker & Associates for professional services at Portland State University. Financing will be provided from HUD funds.

William F. Knight Law Center, UO

An agreement was negotiated with Geotechnical Resources, Inc., for professional services at the University of Oregon. Financing will be provided from gift funds.

Women's Restroom Remodel, Rooms 277 & 477, Cramer Hall, PSU

An agreement was negotiated with WAM Architecture for professional services at Portland State University. Financing will be provided from state funds.

Zebra Fish Laboratory Project, UO

An agreement was negotiated with Gerald McDonnell & Associates, Inc., for architectural services at the University of Oregon. Financing will be provided from building use credit funds.

AWARDS OF CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS

Administration Building Reroof , WOSC

On April 22, 1996, Interstate Roofing, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $165,020. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Administration Building Roof Repair, OSU

On July 2, 1996, Anderson Roofing Company, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $119,484. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Allen Hall Phase 1 Renovation (Electronic Media Center), UO

On June 3, 1996, Lee Construction was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $826,000. Financing will be provided from gift funds.

Autzen Skysuite Window Replacement, UO

On July 1, 1996, Key Industries, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $109,186. Financing will be provided from auxiliary funds.

Autzen Stadium Seating Replacement, UO

On April 11, 1996, Nor-Pak Systems, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $583,104. Financing will be provided from athletic funds.

Bean Residence Hall - East Complex Repairs, UO

On April 26, 1996, 2G Construction was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $882,200. Financing will be provided from housing funds.

Bexell Hall Piping Replacement & ADA Toilet Room Upgrade, OSU

On May 31, 1996, Dale Ramsay Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $254,988. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Book Storage Shelving, OSU

On August 1, 1996, Spacesaver Specialists, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $92,685. Financing will be provided from general funds.

Britt Center West Interior Remodel Project, SOSC

On March 5, 1996, Treehouse Woodworks was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $156,712. Financing will be provided from institutional reserve and capital repair funds.

Education Hall Elevator Retrofit, WOSC

On July 15, 1996, Colamette Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $279,877. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Finley, Bloss & Arnold Halls Exterior Restoration, OSU

On July 31, 1996, Pioneer Waterproofing Company, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $346,943. Financing will be provided from housing funds, building funds, and repair reserves.

Heating Plant Reroof Project, UO

On April 29, 1996, Umpqua Roofing Company, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $142,918. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Helen Gordon Child Development Center Reroofing, PSU

On July 16, 1996, Roof Toppers, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $103,950. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

HMSC Exhibit Construction, Base Bids A & B, OSU

On August 6, 1996, Design Craftsmen, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $862,707. Financing will be provided from federal funds.

HMSC Exhibit Construction, Base Bid C, OSU

On August 6, 1996, Academy Studios, Division of WGM, was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $169,990. Financing will be provided from federal funds.

HVAC Equipment Prepurchase, SOSC

On March 19, 1996, Parke Air Systems, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $180,910. Financing will be provided from general funds.

Kidder Hall Window Replacement, OSU

On April 16, 1996, Dale Ramsay Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $429,823. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Maaske Hall Reroof , WOSC

On April 22, 1996, Umpqua Roofing Company, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $101,488. Financing will be provided from auxiliary funds.

Masonry Restoration and Cleaning, WOSC

On April 12, 1996, Pioneer Masonry Restoration Company, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $244,396. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

McNary Hall Piping Replacement, OSU

On April 23, 1996, Hydro-Temp Mechanical, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $878,400. Financing will be provided from Ash housing settlement funds, sinking funds, and building repair reserves.

McNary Hall Renovation, OSU

On April 19, 1996, D.G.S. General Construction, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $972,000. Financing will be provided from Ash housing settlement funds, excess sinking funds, operating funds, building repair funds, and honor college funds.

Memorial Union Renovation, Phase II, OSU

On March 29, 1996, Dale Ramsay Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $2,224,510. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Milne Computer Center Reroof, OSU

On June 5, 1996, Sabre Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $235,146. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Nash Hall Cornice Repair, OSU

On July 19, 1996, McKenzie Commercial Contractors, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $120,338. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Oceanography Warehouse Buildings Reroof, OSU

On June 14, 1996, Water Tight Roof Systems, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $83,200. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Onyx Bridge Fire Alarm System Upgrade, UO

On April 26, 1996, Scofield Electric Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $75,315. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Orchard Court Exterior Domestic Water Pipe Replacement, OSU

On August 6, 1996, EMK Contractors, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $171,700. Financing will be provided from housing funds.

Oregon Hall Reroof Project, UO

On April 26, 1996, Umpqua Roofing Company, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $160,980. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Pedestrian Skybridges Repair, 1996, PSU

On May 29, 1996, Todd Hess Building Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $109,090. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Primary Standby Feeder, Phase 2, UO

On May 20, 1996, Scofield Electric Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $425,908. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Research Forest Field Office Addition, OSU

On April 2, 1996, Terry Hackenbruck Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $206,600. Financing will be provided from forest operation funds.

Residence Hall Maintenance Building Project, SOSC

On December 22, 1995, Adroit Construction Co., Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $84,400. Financing will be provided from housing reserve funds.

Science Building II Reroofing, PSU

On July 16, 1996, Roof Toppers, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $171,545. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Steam & Condensate System Replacement, Phase II, OSU

On April 23, 1996, Triad Mechanical, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $1,066,000. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds and bonds.

Student Family Housing Phase 2 Demolition, UO

On May 6, 1996, Staton Construction, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $129,744. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Student Family Housing Phase 2 Site Prep, UO

On August 6, 1996, Delta Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $407,464. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Taylor Hall Environmental Remediation REBID, SOSC

On June 27, 1996, Adroit Construction Company, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $1,586,000. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds and Article XI-G bonds.

Todd Hall Fire Sprinkler System, WOSC

On June 10, 1996, Fire Systems West, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $75,995. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

Todd Hall Plumbing Retrofit, WOSC

On June 7, 1996, Columbia-Cascade Construction, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $250,300. Financing will be provided from capital repair funds.

University Inn Fire Alarm System Upgrade, UO

On August 12, 1996, McPheeters Electric Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $85,800. Financing will be provided from auxiliary funds.

Valsetz Dining Office Addition, WOSC

On June 7, 1996, Colamette Construction Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $270,459. Financing will be provided from auxiliary funds.

Weight Room Addition, 1996, PSU

On June 12, 1996, Lorentz Bruun Company, Inc., was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $154,333. Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Werner College Center Remodel, WOSC

On April 22, 1996, Wildish Building Company was awarded a contract for this project in the amount of $1,580,000 (estimated). Financing will be provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

ACCEPTANCE OF PROJECTS

Academic Counseling Center Renovation, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on January 30, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $311,004. Financing was provided from auxiliary funds.

Allen Hall Reroofing Project, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on May 23, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $90,341. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

Amazon Housing Redevelopment Phase 1, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on April 18, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $395,657. Financing was provided from Article XI-F(1) bonds.

Britt Center West Interior Remodel, SOSC

This project is complete and was accepted on July 1, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $170,485. Financing was provided from institutional reserve and capital repair funds.

Britt Hall Exterior Repair Project, SOSC

This project is complete and was accepted on June 28, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $174,553. Financing was provided from capital repair and general funds.

Central Library Temporary Book Storage, OSU

This project is complete and was accepted on July 31, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $105,122. Financing was provided from library funds.

Knight Library Additions & Alterations Bid Package 2, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on January 30, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $8,644,103. Financing was provided from general funds and gift funds.

McArthur Court Roof Repair/Truss Preorder, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on March 23, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $309,309. Financing was provided from capital repair and athletic funds.

Millrace Studio 1, Computer Lab Project, UO

This project is complete and was accepted on March 25, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $95,279. Financing was provided from general funds.

Withycombe Hall Reroof, OSU

This project is complete and was accepted on May 31, 1996. The final direct construction costs were $342,700. Financing was provided from capital repair funds.

(No Board action required)