Oregon University System logo

Oregon State Board of Higher Education
Board Budget and Finance Committee
July 21, 2000

Table of Contents

  1. Action Items - Executive Summaries
    1. SOU Purchase of Lewis Property
    2. 2000-01 Academic Year Fee Book
    3. 2000-01 Annual Operating Campus Budget Allocations
    4. 2001-2003 Biennial Operating Budget Request
    5. 2001-2007 Capital Construction Program Request

2. Meeting Notes, June 15, 2000


Purchase of Lewis Property, SOU

Executive Summary
(Action Item)

Summary:

Southern Oregon University seeks Board approval to acquire a property within the campus boundary designated for construction of single apartment-style housing. The University has reached an agreement with the sellers, Donald E. and Marsha S. Lewis, for the purchase of a parcel located at 1349 Oregon Street, Ashland, for the sum of $130,500 plus closing costs, in consideration of the land and dwelling on that site.

Staff Report to the Board:

This property purchase is part of the SOU Housing Department's efforts to meet student demand for apartment-style housing that is not yet available on the campus. As part of the 2001-10 campus master plan, University housing officials will be pursuing a two-phase project to build two 20 unit student apartment facilities within an area of campus close to the Cascade dormitory complex (see map). Phase I of the project is included in SOU's 2001-2003 capital construction budget request. The purchase of the Lewis property will add to the adjacent land currently owned by the University to complete the proposed building site. The project site is currently zoned for higher density residential facilities.

The asking price of $130,500 falls within the appraised value of the property. The purchase transaction would be paid from Article XI-F(1) bonds, with a 15-year term. The estimated annual debt service of $15,000 will initially be repaid from rental income from the existing home and supplemented by SOU student housing auxiliary funds. The debt service will eventually be incorporated into the proposed apartment-style housing project.

The parcel under consideration contains 11,400 square feet of land or .26 acre, including the residence. The environmental assessment assumed that, based on the age of the property, there was the possibility of some lead paint; however, no additional environmental issues have been identified with this facility.

Staff Recommendation:

Staff recommends that the Board authorize Southern Oregon University officials to purchase the Lewis Property at 1349 Oregon Street, Ashland, Oregon, within the SOU campus boundary, for a price not to exceed $130,500 plus closing costs. The purchase will be financed from Article XI-F(1) bonds to be repaid by rental income and student housing auxiliaries.


2000-01 Academic Year Fee Book
(draft submission to the Board)
(see further detail)

Executive Summary
(Action Item)

Summary:

The staff recommends the Board approve the proposed 2000-01 academic year tuition and fees and related policies.

There are three basic tuition and fee structures through which students may enroll at OUS institutions: the regular academic year, summer session and continuing education programs. The tuition and fees, attendant policies and institutional housing rates submitted here for consideration relate only to the regular academic year. The fees are the mandatory enrollment fees students are assessed each term, including: tuition, building, resource, incidental and health fees. The housing section reflects contract policies and rates for dormitory housing.

Board Budget and Finance Committee Action on Tuition under RAM:

In February 1999, the Board Budget and Finance Committee approved a staff recommendation that the tuition and fee policy approval process be maintained until such time as the Board conducts a more intensive review on alternative approaches. Under existing policy each of the three tuition structures is separate with its own unique fee setting process.

The academic year tuition and fees proposed in this staff recommendation are the result of separate decision making processes. These processes include legislative action, Board budget decisions, institution administration and student committee deliberations or student referendum. Second, summer session tuition and fees are recommended by each institution President and approved by the Board each year in December or January. Third, continuing education fees, which have been self-supporting and entrepreneurial in nature, are set at the campus level based on institution policies and market conditions.

Fee Proposals Review:

The various fee proposals submitted by each institution undergo a review by the Chancellor's staff based on several criteria to assure the appropriateness of the recommendations. The staff believes that each proposed fee for the 2000-01 academic year meets this test and warrants the favorable action of the Board. The various fee proposals for each campus are noted in the detail section of this document.

Staff Recommendation to the Board:

Staff recommends that the Board amend OAR 580-040-0040 as follows:(Underlined material is added; brackets denote deletion.)

OAR 580-040-0040 Academic Year Fee Book

The document entitled Academic Year Fee Book, dated July 21, 2000 [July 16, 1999] is hereby amended by reference as a permanent rule. All prior adoptions of academic year fee documents are hereby repealed except as to rights and obligations previously acquired or incurred thereunder.

Through the amendment, the Board adopts the document entitled Academic Year Fee Book, memos of attachment amending the draft document, and other amendments and attached schedules noted in this agenda item.

BOARD ACTION: (Roll call vote required)


2001-2003 Biennial Operating Budget Request

Executive Summary
(Action Item)

Background:

Each biennium, prior to the legislative session, the State Board of Higher Education submits an operating budget request to the Governor covering the ensuing biennium. The operating budget request includes the following: funding for the Education and General program including operating costs for the seven OUS campuses, central services and the University Centers; for the Statewide Public Service programs (Agricultural Experiment Station, Extension Service, and Forest Research Laboratory) and for the Engineering Education Investment Fund (EEIF).

Staff Recommendation to the Board:

Staff proposes that the Board Budget and Finance Committee recommend for approval by the full Board the following actions on the Oregon University System 2001-2003 Biennial Operating Budget Request:

• Approve the 2001-2003 Current Service Level request as presented to the Board;

• Approve the 2001-2003 policy option packages as presented to the Board; and

• Authorize the Chancellor to present the approved budget to the Governor's Office on or before September 1, 2000, in a form agreed upon with the Director of the Department of Administrative Services.

•Staff recommends that the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration be authorized to make any technical adjustments required to the request during the ensuing period prior to the Legislative session.


2001-2007 Capital Construction Program Request

Executive Summary
(Action Item)

Background:

Each biennium, prior to the legislative session, the State Board of Higher Education submits a capital construction program to the Governor covering the ensuing three biennia. For the 2001-2003 period, a formally approved Capital Budget request is made. For the 2003-2005 and 2005-2007 periods only a forecast of capital needs is shown. The 2001-2003 capital budget request recommended to the Board for approval totals $762,640,000 for the seven OUS campuses and University Centers. The capital construction program, covering the entire six-year period 2001-2007, totals $1,951,270,000.

Staff Report to the Board:

The 2001-2003 capital budget recommended to the Board for approval totals $762,640,000 for the seven OUS campuses and University Centers. Approximately 79 percent of the request
($604.6 million) pertains to projects related to capital repair, code needs, renovation or new construction of Education and General facilities (E&G), including Systemwide projects. E&G facilities support the instruction, research, and service missions of Oregon's public universities. The remaining 21 percent ($158 million) is for projects carried out by Auxiliaries, including Student Facilities funded by the student building fee.

The six-year 2001-2007 capital construction program budget recommended to the Board for approval totals $1,951,270,000, including $1.642 billion for Education and General facilities and $309 million for Auxiliaries and Student Facilities.

A supplement to the recommendation, the 2001-2007 Capital Construction Program Request has been prepared under separate cover and provides details of the requests by biennium, including information on the major issues, requests presented in order of Board budget priorities, a summary of the outstanding and forecasted Article XI-F(1) bonds and Article XI-G bonds, and an enumeration of proposed Certificates of Participation. Related exhibits and tables provide further detail.

Staff Recommendation to the Board:

Staff recommends that the Board Committee on Budget and Finance recommend for approval by the full Board the proposed 2001-2007 Capital Construction Program budget request. With this approval, the Board is asked to authorize the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration to prepare and submit to the Department of Administrative Services a proposed 2001-2007 Capital Construction Program request in accordance with this docket item and the supplemental materials included herein. Further, it is recommended that staff be authorized by the Board to apply for the necessary grants and seek the necessary bonding authority and Certificates of Participation authorizations to effect the projects and purchase the equipment and systems described in this docket item for the 2001-2003 biennium. In addition, staff recommend that the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration be authorized to make any technical adjustments required to the program during the ensuing period prior to the Legislative session.



ACADEMIC YEAR FEE BOOK 2000-01, TUITION & OTHER FEE POLICIES
(Further Detail)

Staff Report to the Board

The Academic Year Fee Book contains the proposed fees and associated policies relating to all mandatory charges required of students enrolled within the regular, on-campus, academic year programs offered by the seven public universities and university centers of the Oregon University System. The Chancellor recommends the Board adopt these fees as submitted to the Board Budget and Finance Committee. Each fee proposal has been tested against a set of criteria to evaluate the appropriateness of any fee increase. This criteria included:

•How does the fee increase relate to inflationary and obligatory cost requirements?

•Have there been mandatory cost increases imposed on a given fee supported service, such as that imposed by the changes in state or federal wage laws?

•Is it important to student life to sustain support to a given operation?

•Has the fee proposal been endorsed by the institution's students, either through its student government, student committee structure, or student referendum?

•Is the function or service sufficiently important to student life or the operation of the institution to warrant the offset of revenue losses caused by declining enrollments?
The staff believes that each proposed fee meets one or more of these criteria and warrants the favorable action of the Board.

Tuition and fees represent the mandatory enrollment fees assessed all students in the regular academic year program of institutions. The mandatory enrollment fees are comprised of the following separate fees: Tuition, Resource, Building, Incidental, and Health Service fees. It should be noted that certain fee increases may be expected and are consistent with the Board's budget submission and the Governor's and Legislature's recommendations, including action to maintain tuition at the 1996 rate for resident undergraduate students only. Tuition, formerly referred to as instruction fee, is the largest of several components that make up the total tuition and fees amount. The revenue generated by each element of the tuition and fee schedule is dedicated to a specific purpose, independent of the other components.

Comparisons of tuition and fee charges among representative Western public institutions, shown in the Schedules 6 (a) and (b) series of tables, depict the relationship of annual charges and percentage changes of Oregon institutions versus others in the West. In addition, Schedule 6 (c) provides a comparison of 2000-01 tuition with the shared peers of OUS institutions.

OVERVIEW OF CURRENT TUITION AND FEE POLICIES

Tuition: Tuition rates, shown on Schedule 1, generate revenues that apply toward support of the Education and General Services component of the expenditure budget. Tuition is part of the biennial budget funding package proposed by the Board and addressed by the Governor and the Legislature.

Tuition for all institutions is generally increasing at the same rate. As a result of 1999 legislative action on the 1999-2001 budget, tuition for resident undergraduate students at all institutions remains at the 1996-97 rate. The 2000-01 resident and nonresident graduate tuition and the nonresident undergraduate tuition are increasing 5.25 percent over 1999-00 at five institutions. Portland State University proposes resident and nonresident graduate rates increase three percent as was done in 1999-00. Eastern Oregon University non-resident undergraduate tuition is the same as resident tuition and remains at the 1996-97 rate.

Fees are assessed within undergraduate and graduate fee structures by resident and nonresident student classifications. The residency classification applies to all admitted students. Non-admitted students enrolling under the part-time student policy are assessed a fee appropriate to the level of the course taken, without regard to residency status.

The full-time tuition rate for undergraduates is assessed for all credit hours between 12 and 18. The full-time tuition rate for graduates is assessed for all credit hours between nine and 16. The fees for eight credit hours or less are prorated for the hours enrolled. If students take credit hours above these plateaus, they are assessed an additional amount for each hour taken.

Building Fee: The building fee, summarized on Schedule 2, is the same for all institutions. The rate remains at $25 per term per student. This fee generates monies to finance the debt retirement for construction associated with student centers, health centers, and recreational facilities constructed through the issuance of Article XI-F(1) bonds. It is historically set by the Legislature through ORS 351.170. The Board was initially presented with a proposal to increase this fee in July 1996 with the approval of the 1997-1999 Capital Construction Budget Request. The 1997 Legislature approved the Board's request to authorize an increase in the student building fee to $25.00, which is unchanged. A pro rata fee is assessed on part-time students. A legislative concept has been submitted for consideration by the 2001 Legislature which would increase this fee to $35 per student per term effective with the 2001-2003 biennium, and $45 per student per term in the 2003-2005 biennium and thereafter.

Incidental Fee: Incidental fee changes are described below for each institution and summarized on Schedule 2. This fee recommendation is, for the most part, initially made by student committees on each campus in accordance with a Board-approved incidental fee policy (OAR 580-010-0090). In some instances the student committee recommendations are supported by general campus student referenda. The funds generated by this fee are, as specified by the OAR, to be used for "student union activities, educational, cultural, and student government activities, and athletic activities". The President of each institution reviews the student committee recommendations. Once satisfied with the proposal, the President submits the recommendation to the Chancellor for his review; the Chancellor in turn submits the proposal to the Board.

Health Service Fee: Institution recommendations for health service fees are described for each institution below and summarized in Schedule 2. This fee is used to support the student health services of each institution which are operated as auxiliary services. Generally, rate increases reflect the institutions' efforts to maintain the self-support nature of these services. Mandatory health insurance policies may be included in this fee by some institutions, which may be remitted with proof of other adequate insurance.

Resource Fee: Resource fee changes recommended by the institutions are described below and shown on Schedule 2. Resource fees provide funds for specific programs to assist with faculty, resource materials, equipment, and specialized services. The fees are assessed only to targeted student populations admitted to, or generally understood to be enrolled in specific programs; they are not paid by students in other programs who might incidentally take a course offered by one of these specified programs. Students enrolled under the part-time student fee policy are subject to the resource fees appropriate to the program area. The estimated income of all such fees may be no more than five percent of the total budgeted state general fund and tuition.

There are three categories of fees that have evolved in the development of the resource fee. These are: fees assessed every term to all students, such as the technology fees; fees assessed every term to students in specific degree programs, such as the MBA Resource Fee; and fees assessed only one time, such as matriculation fees assessed in the first term a student is admitted.

Technology fees provide revenue specifically targeted to improve computer related services and equipment to students. The fee setting process generally involves joint student and administration committees on campus to develop the recommendation for fee rates and allocation of the resulting revenue.

Similarly, most program resource fees provide additional services to students in specific degree programs with additional specialized services, improved equipment and other materials. The fee recommendation generally is the result of joint administration and student participation in the process.

Matriculation fees are assessed one-time only in the first term of matriculation. They are normally established by an institution administration to replace a variety of other administrative fees such as support of student orientation programs, counseling and peer advisor programs and others.

All institutions assess resource fees. Some institutions are proposing rates and/or new resource fees. All the dollar amounts are on a per-term basis unless otherwise noted. Most fees are prorated for part-time hours.

Total Tuition and Fees: The total tuition and fee rates for each institution compared to 1999-00 are summarized on Schedule 4. This reflects the sum of tuition, building, incidental, health services, and technology/resource fees and any special purpose fees approved by the Board.

Note that the Legislature increased state funds by an amount which offset an anticipated 5.25 percent increase in resident undergraduate tuition only. These state funds do not offset fees for incidental, health, or resource fees services. To demonstrate what the tuition increase would have been had the resident undergraduate tuition not been frozen, Schedule 4 compares the 2000-01 tuition with and without a 5.25 percent increase to the 1999-00 tuition totals.

The following are explanations for each institution generated fee recommendation. Each of these proposals has been reviewed by the Chancellor's staff. Staff believe each proposal has met the criteria outlined at the beginning of this docket item for Board approval.

Eastern Oregon University

Tuition: EOU tuition for resident undergraduates and nonresident undergraduates is the same as the previous year's rates. The tuition rates for all graduates are proposed to increase 5.25 percent.

Resource Fees
:
EOU proposes no increase in its Technology Fee at $50 per term for all students. EOU proposes to increase its one time Matriculation Fee by $50 to $100 for new students and increase services to new students by expanding the Eastern Experience Program.

Incidental Fees: EOU incidental fees are increasing $7 to $193 per term to support inflation increases, additional student travel per diem, addition of Women's Soccer as a club sport, and an additional .5 FTE Assistant Science Journal Editor.

Health Service Fees: EOU health services fees remain at $89 per term. A $2 increase in basic health services fee is offset by the $2 reduction of the student health insurance premium to $15 per term. Students who can verify outside health insurance coverage may secure a waiver of the student health insurance portion of the fee.

Total Tuition and Fees: The total basic tuition and fees for EOU are increasing as follows: resident undergraduates by 0.6% to $1,129 per term; nonresident undergraduates by 0.6 % to $1,129 per term; resident graduates by 4.6% to $1,970 per term; and, nonresident graduates by 4.9% to $3,451 per term.

Oregon Institute of Technology

Tuition: OIT tuition for resident undergraduates is the same as the previous year's rates. The tuition rates for nonresident undergraduates and all graduates are proposed to increase 5.25 percent.

Resource Fees:
OIT proposes to increase its Technology Resource Fee $12 per term to $40 per term to help address the increasing demands for technology services. This brings OIT's technology fee in line with three other small institutions.

In addition, campus officials propose an increase of $20 in the Matriculation Fee to $45, to be paid one-time by new students for student orientation and related activities. This increase will cover increases in minimum wage, offset past contributions by student assessed incidental fees, increase advance registrations, and increase extended orientation activities.

Incidental Fees: OIT incidental fees are increasing $17 to $134 per term to cover inflation, student personnel, and insurance costs, to provide a new child care subsidy and improve operating reserves.

Health Service Fees: OIT health services fees will be reduced by $2, to $90 per term, to reflect the reduction of the student health insurance premium to $15 per term. Students who can verify outside health insurance coverage may secure a waiver of the health insurance portion of this fee.

Total Tuition and Fees: The total basic tuition and fees for OIT are increasing as follows: resident undergraduates by 2.4% to $1,153 per term; nonresident undergraduates by 5.6% to $4,025 per term; resident graduates by 6.0% to $1,955 per term; and, nonresident graduates by 5.7% to $3,447 per term.

Oregon State University

Tuition: OSU tuition for resident undergraduates is the same as the previous year's rates. The tuition rates for nonresident undergraduates and all graduates, including Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, will increase 5.25 percent.

Resource Fees: OSU is proposing to increase three of its resource fees. The Technology Fee will increase $23 to $75 per term to address increasing technology needs of students.

The Pharmacy Fee, for current students admitted into the original Pharmacy program, will increase $57 to $1,149 per term to support that program's operating budget. The Engineering Fee will increase by $10 to $150 per term to help with increased computer laboratory cost and expansion. This fee is being expanded to be assessed to undergraduate students as well as graduates. The MBA Resident Fee will remain at $130 per term; the MBA Nonresident Fee will remain at $315 per term. The fee assessed to students admitted to the University Honors College will remain at $25 per term.

The one-time matriculation fee assessed to all new students will remain at $75.

Incidental Fees: OSU incidental fees are increasing by $7 to $140 per term to cover inflation and program costs.

Health Service Fees: OSU health services fees are being increased $1 to $80 per term to cover inflation.

Total Tuition and Fees: The total basic tuition and fees for OSU are increasing as follows: resident undergraduates by 2.6% to $1,218 per term; nonresident undergraduates by 5.6% to $4,368 per term; resident graduates by 6.0% to $2,297 per term; and, nonresident graduates by 5.7% to $3,901 per term.

Portland State University

Tuition: PSU tuition for resident undergraduates is the same as the previous year's rates. The tuition rates for nonresident undergraduates will increase 5.25 percent and all graduates will increase 3.0 percent. In 1999-00 PSU tuition increases were 3.0 percent for all graduates and nonresident undergraduates.

Resource Fees: PSU proposes to add one new resource fee and to increase three other resource fees. The Technology Fee for undergraduates will increase by $12 to $60 per term and for graduate students will increase by $13.50 to $63 per term to provide a variety of expanded technology service to students.

A new fee of $50 per term is proposed to be assessed on all undergraduate students admitted to the School of Business. This fee, which has strong student support, will provide professional mentoring, corporate recruiting, job search assistance, and internship location assistance. The MBA fee will remain at $120 per term. The engineering program fees will increase by $20 to $150 per term to provide better equipment and other support services to the engineering program.

The one-time Matriculation Fee will increase $20 to $50 for mandatory orientation and additional student advising for incoming students.

Incidental Fees: PSU incidental fees are increasing $1 to $127 per term for inflationary cost increases.

Health Service Fees: PSU health services fees are being increased $6 to $65 per term due to increases in health service program costs.

Total Tuition and Fees: The total basic tuition and fees for PSU are increasing as follows: resident undergraduates by 1.6% to $1,175 per term; nonresident undergraduates by 5.4% to $4,097 per term; resident graduates by 3.6% to $2,173 per term; and, nonresident graduates by 3.4% to $3,709 per term.

Southern Oregon University

Tuition: SOU tuition for resident undergraduates is the same as the previous year's rates. The tuition rates for nonresident undergraduates and all graduates will increase 5.25 percent.

Resource Fees: The Technology Fee will increase $10 to a maximum of $40 per term to address increased demand for technology services.

SOU proposes two new resource fees to be assessed to masters degree students in Applied Psychology. The fee for students in the Mental Health Counseling track will be $333 per term; and for those in the Group Facilitation and Training track, the fee will be $167 per term. These fees will be used for adjunct faculty, field supervisors for "lab" and "field practicum", to enable the program to meet accreditation standards. The Master of Management Fee will remain at $105 for residents and $150 for non-residents. The MBA Resource Fee remains at $100 per term for residents and $150 for nonresidents.

SOU proposes an increase in its one-time Matriculation Fee assessed to all new students by $35 to $75 to provide more extensive assessment services in math and foreign language, as well as additional peer advising services.

Incidental Fees: SOU incidental fees are increasing $16.50 to $131 per term. The increase will aid the Schneider Child Care Center, student organizations, women's softball and soccer, as well as cover inflation for on-going service levels.

Health Service Fees: SOU basic health services fees will increase by $3.50 to $72 per term to cover inflation and other operating costs. In addition, a $15 per term health insurance fee will be assessed, similar to those at EOU, OIT, and WOU. Students who can verify outside health insurance coverage may secure a waiver of the health insurance portion of this fee.

Total Tuition and Fees: The total basic tuition and fees for SOU are increasing as follows: resident undergraduates by 4.2% to $1,123 per term; nonresident undergraduates by 6.2% to $3,505 per term; resident graduates by 7.0% to $1,948 per term; and, nonresident graduates by 6.3% to $3,441 per term.

University of Oregon

Tuition: UO tuition for resident undergraduates is the same as the previous year's rates. The tuition rates for nonresident undergraduates and all graduates will increase 5.25 percent.

Resource Fees: UO is proposing changes in two of its resource fees. The Technology Fee is proposed to increase by $10 to $75 per term for all students to address continued growing demand for increased technology services for students.

The Resource Fee assessed students enrolled in the Honor's College will continue at $50 per term for students admitted between Fall 1997 and Fall 1999 and $100 per term for the first two years for students admitted Fall 1999. For students admitted Fall 2000 the resource fee will be $200 per term. This is part of a four year phase-in to increase the Honors College resource fee to $300 for newly admitted students by 2002-2003. The concept has been endorsed by the Honors College Student Association. The income generated by this fee increase will fund, in part, additional faculty serving the Honors College as a result of the decision to increase Honors College enrollment from 400 to 600 students and in order to maintain intensive small enrollment offerings. It is anticipated that the new scholarships for high GPA students will substantially mitigate the impact of this fee on financially needy students.

The Resource Fee on all students admitted to the Architecture and Landscape Architecture programs remains at $30 per term. The College of Business Administration resource fees remain at $100 per term for undergraduates and $500 per term for masters degree students.

The UO is proposing two new resource fees in the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS). All undergraduates majoring or undeclared in the College of Arts and Sciences will be assessed a resource fee of $15 per term. The funds will be used to enhance opportunities and facilities for students through improved and expanded advising, supervised participatory learning experiences, and support for specialized student facilities and equipment.

Undergraduates majoring in a science-intensive program will be assessed $20 per term in addition to the more general resource CAS Fee of $15 per term for a total of $35. This additional fee will assist in providing science students with more direct hands-on science research, equipping scientific teaching laboratories with state-of-the-art equipment, developing more environmentally friendly teaching methods, and fostering partnerships with industry. Science intensive programs is defined as departments belonging to the sciences and those with a substantial science component, including Anthropology, Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, and Geography.

The Law Resources Fee will remain at $2,075 per semester.

The Matriculation Fee is in the third of a three year phase-in of this one-time fee for all admitted students. The fee will continue to be $200 for undergraduates, and $100 for graduate, law, and post baccalaureate students to be assessed in the first term matriculated. All continuing or returning students matriculated prior to fall 1998 will no longer be assessed the $15 per term Matriculation Fee.

Incidental Fees: Incidental fees are increasing $5 to $168.75 per term for inflation on existing programs, increasing designated driver shuttle services, and support for an International Resource Center.

Health Service Fees: UO health services fees are being increased by $3 to $91 per term to maintain basic student health center operations as recommended by the Student Health Advisory Committee, and for support of counseling services.

Recreational Center Fee: The UO Recreational Center Fee is set by the Board at $15.25 per term.

Total Tuition and Fees: The total basic tuition and fees for UO are increasing as follows: resident undergraduates by 0.2% to $1,273 per term; nonresident undergraduates by 4.9% to $4,613 per term; resident graduates by 4.5% to $2,352 per term; and, nonresident graduates by 4.8% to $3,986 per term.

Western Oregon University

Tuition: WOU tuition for resident undergraduates is the same as the previous year's rates. The tuition rates for nonresident undergraduates and all graduates will increase 5.25 percent.

Resource Fees: WOU proposes to increase its Technology Fee for all students by $12 to $40 per term to meet inflation and provide smart classrooms and additional computer labs. This brings WOU's Technology fee in line with the three other small OUS institutions.

The one-time Matriculation Fee of $75 assessed all new and transfer students remains the same as the previous year.

Incidental Fees: WOU incidental fees are increasing by $11 to $133 per term to cover inflation, provide additional funds for athletics, student government, student media, and student leadership activities.

Health Service Fees: WOU basic health services fees are being increased $1 to $61 per term to cover inflation. The student health insurance fee is reduced by $2 per term to $15 per term for a net decrease of $1 in the total health services fee. Students who can verify outside health insurance coverage may secure a waiver of this fee.

Total Tuition and Fees: The total basic tuition and fees for WOU are increasing as follows: resident undergraduates by 2.0% to $1,114 per term; nonresident undergraduates by 5.5% to $3,620 per term; resident graduates by 5.7% to $1,939 per term; and, nonresident graduates by 5.5% to $3,432 per term.

Other Significant Policy Changes:

Several policy changes are noted in Academic Year Fee Book under the Summary of Fee and Policy Changes of 2000-01. Below are highlighted the more significant of those changes.

Staff Fee Policy Transfer: At the June 16, 2000 meeting, the Board approved OAR 580-022-0031, Transfer of Staff Fee Privileges. As with the original Staff Fee Policy (OAR 580-022-0030), the Transfer of Staff Fee Privileges policy is incorporated into the Academic Year Fee Book.

Historically, qualified staff and faculty have been able to enroll for up to 10 credit hours at a reduced tuition rate. To further enhance the institutions' ability to recruit and retain quality faculty and staff, this policy is being extended to qualifying family members and domestic partners. Many public universities in other states are offering this feature.

This policy can be used by either the employee or one qualified family member/domestic partner at a time at any institution, during any term, including summer session and continuing education credit courses. Under this policy, the family member/domestic partner may enroll for up to 10 credit hours at the staff fee rate (currently $15 per credit hour). Additional credit hours may be taken at the regular per credit hour rate. The tuition plateau does not apply under this policy. Charges for all other mandatory enrollment fees do apply; these include Building Fee, Resource Fees, Health Service Fee, and Incidental Fee. However, Presidents of OUS institutions may exclude certain programs from the policy. This policy will be reviewed in 2001-02.

The transfer of staff fee benefits is not available for retired employees, or Oregon Health Sciences University employees participating in the OUS/OHSU intergovernmental agreement.

Cooperating School Districts: The degree requirements for Teacher Education programs require students to participate in student teaching and other practica experiences within an educational setting. To compensate local school districts for the services of supervising teachers and administrators, institutions have historically offered a specified number of credit hours to be available at staff fee rates. These discounted credit hour awards must be redeemed within five academic quarters from issuance. This policy is being revised to establish consistency throughout the system in qualifications for earning and redeeming these enrollment discounts.

Under this revised policy, a school district may earn five credit hours of enrollment privilege for supervising a full-time student teacher per term or three credit hours of enrollment privilege for supervising a part-time student teacher or experiential preparatory practica. Full-time student teaching is defined as the culminating, full-time supervised teaching experience provided for students completing a program approved by the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission, leading to Initial Licensure in one or more of four authorizations: Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle, and High School; and specialty endorsements.

The credit hour privilege may be redeemed by any qualified employee designated by the local school district. No more than eight credit hours at the staff fee rate may be redeemed in any one term by any one school district teacher. Credit hour privileges earned from one institution may be redeemed through any other institution with a teacher preparation program (OIT is the only OUS institution without such a program). These enrollment privileges may be used during any academic quarter, including summer session and for continuing education credit programs. Institutions may restrict use of enrollment privileges in courses on a "space available" basis or impose other restrictions consistent with institutional needs related to specific courses.

Southern Oregon University Medford Center: The Southern Oregon University fee for courses covered by the Memorandum of Understanding with the Rogue Community College are remaining at $45 per credit to match Rogue Community College rates.

Oregon College of Engineering and Computer Science: Tuition for courses at the Oregon College of Engineering and Computer Science will be set at $211 per credit hour. Tuition for the Masters of Software Engineering will be $495 per credit tuition.

Masters of International Management: The Masters of International Management, previously through the Oregon Joint Graduate Professional School of Business is now part of the PSU degree program structure. As a result, the fee for this program is being removed as a unique program fee.

Transition Authority: A special provision initiated in 1999-2000 to allow institutions some discretion to accommodate the transition to the year 2000 is being rescinded, as it is no longer necessary.

Residence Hall and Food Service Charges: Institutional residence halls and food services operate as auxiliary services. As such, auxiliary fees and charges are to cover the cost of their operations. In recommending residence hall room and board charges for 1999-00, institution administrators estimated residence hall occupancy in relation to enrollment projections and present occupancy patterns.

Recommended changes for 2000-01 in room and board rates are reflected in the examples given in Schedule 6. These rates are only examples, since each institution offers various room and board combinations; most basic room and board rates will increase between 4.0 and 5.9 percent. The rates are detailed in the Academic Year Fee Book.

Not covered by this action are rates for the Portland State University campus. Student Services Northwest, Inc., a private corporation, operates the residence halls at Portland State University and establishes the rates as specified in a service contract. The rates require approval by Portland State University officials.

Report of Public Hearing on Academic Year Fee Book

Summary of Testimony Received

The public hearing on the 2000-01 Academic Year Fee Book was conducted on Monday, June 26, 2000 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., in Room 121 of Susan Campbell Hall, on the University of Oregon campus. No written or oral testimony was presented.

Staff Recommendation to the Board

Staff recommends that the Board amend OAR 580-40-040 as follows:

(Underlined material is added; brackets denote deletion.)

OAR 580-040-0040 Academic Year Fee Book

The document entitled Academic Year Fee Book, dated July 21, 2000 [July 16, 1999] is hereby amended by reference as a permanent rule. All prior adoptions of academic year fee documents are hereby repealed except as to rights and obligations previously acquired or incurred thereunder.

Through the amendment, the Board adopts the document entitled Academic Year Fee Book, memos of attachment amending the draft document, and other amendments and attached schedules noted in this agenda item.

BOARD ACTION: (Roll call vote required)

Schedule 1

Tuition Recommendations
Full-Time Student
2000-01 Academic Year Annual Amounts

 

1999-2000

2000-2001

% Change

 

 

 

EOU

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

2,316

2,316

0.00%

Undergraduate Nonresident

2,316

2,316

0.00%

Graduate Resident

4,599

4,839

5.22%

Graduate Nonresident

8,820

9,282

5.24%

 

 

 

OIT

 

 

 

Undergraduate Residentz

2,592

2,592

0.00%

Undergraduate Nonresident

10,650

11,208

5.24%

Graduate Resident

4,749

4,998

5.24%

Graduate Nonresident

9,000

9,474

5.27%

 

 

 

OSU

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

2,694

2,694

0.00%

Undergraduate Nonresident

11,538

12,144

5.25%

Graduate Resident

5,634

5,931

5.27%

Graduate Nonresident

10,206

10,743

5.26%

 

 

 

PSU

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

2,694

2,694

0.00%

Undergraduate Nonresident

10,887

11,460

5.26%

Graduate Resident

5,514

5,679

2.99%

Graduate Nonresident

9,987

10,287

3.00%

 

 

 

SOU

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

2,520

2,520

0.00%

Undergraduate Nonresident

9,183

9,666

5.26%

Graduate Resident

4,746

4,995

5.25%

Graduate Nonresident

9,000

9,474

5.27%

 

 

 

UO

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

2,694

2,694

0.00%

Undergraduate Nonresident

12,081

12,714

5.24%

Graduate Resident

5,634

5,931

5.27%

Graduate Nonresident

10,293

10,833

5.25%

 

 

 

WOU

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

2,520

2,520

0.00%

Undergraduate Nonresident

9,537

10,038

5.25%

Graduate Resident

4,746

4,995

5.25%

Graduate Nonresident

9,000

9,474

5.27%

 

 

 

Other

 

 

 

OSU Vet Med Res

9,408

9,900

5.23%

OSU Vet Med Nonres

19,191

20,199

5.25%

OSU Pharm D Res 4yr UG

6,810

7,167

5.24%

OSU Pharm D NonRes 4yr UG

14,700

15,471

5.24%

 

 

 

UO Law Resident

5,632

5,928

5.26%

UO Law Nonresident

9,578

10,080

5.24%

* All dollars in three term total annual amounts.

Schedule 2

Building, Incidental, Health Service, and Resources Fee Recommendations

Full-Time Student
2000-01 Academic Year Annual Amounts

 

1999-2000

2000-2001

% Change

Building Fee

 

 

 

All Institutions

75.00

75.00

0.00%

UO Law (Semester)

75.00

75.00

0.00%

 

 

 

Incidental Fee

 

 

 

EOU

558.00

579.00

3.8%

OIT

351.00

402.00

14.5%

OIT Metro Center

6.00

6.00

0.0%

OSU

399.00

420.00

5.3%

PSU

378.00

381.00

0.8%

SOU

343.50

393.00

14.4%

UO

491.25

506.25

3.1%

UO Law (Semester)

491.00

507.00

3.3%

WOU

366.00

399.00

9.0%

 

 

 

Health Service Fee

 

 

 

EOU

267.00

267.00

0.0%

OIT

276.00

270.00

-2.2%

OSU

237.00

240.00

1.3%

PSU

177.00

195.00

10.2%

SOU

205.50

261.00

27.0%

UO

264.00

273.00

3.4%

UO Law (Semester)

264.00

273.00

3.4%

WOU

231.00

228.00

-1.3%

 

 

 

Resource Fees

 

 

 

EOU:

 

 

 

Technology Fee - All

150

150

0.0%

 

 

 

OIT:

 

 

 

Technology Fee - All

84

120

42.9%

 

 

 

 

OSU:      
Technology Fee - All

156

225

44.2%

MBA Residents

390

390

0.0%

MBA Nonresidents

945

945

0.0%

Engineering

420

450

7.1%

Pharmacy

3,276

3,447

5.2%

Honors College

75

75

0.0%

 

 

 

PSU:

 

 

 

Technology - Undergraduates

144

180

25.0%

Technology - Graduates

148.50

189

27.3%

Sch of Bus. Undergraduates

-

150

--

Sch. of Bus. Masters

360

360

0.0%

Engineering

390

450

15.4%

 

 

 

SOU:

 

 

 

Technology Fee - All

90

120

33.3%

MBA Residents

300

300

0.0%

MBA Nonresidents

450

450

0.0%

MMgt Residents

315

315

0.0%

MMgt Nonresidents

450

450

0.0%

M Mental Health Counseling - All

--

999

--

M Group Facilitating & Tng - All

--

501

--

 

 

 

UO:

 

 

 

Technology Fee - All

195

225

15.4%

Law Residents

4,150

4,150

0.0%

Law Nonresidents

4,150

4,150

0.0%

Architecture and Landscape Arch

90

90

0.0%

NonSci Arts & Sci U/G& Undecl'd

0

45

--

Sci Prog Arts & Sci Undergrad

0

105

--

C. of Bus. U/G Residents

300

300

0.0%

C. of Bus. U/G Nonresidents

300

300

0.0%

C. of Bus. Master Residents

1,500

1,500

0.0%

C. of Bus. Master Nonresidents

1,500

1,500

0.0%

Honors C. Fall 97 admits

150

150

0.0%

Honors C. Fall 99 admits

300

300

0.0%

Honors C. Fall 00 admits

--

600

-

Rec/Fitness Ctr Bond Fee

45.75

45.75

0.0%

Matriculation Fee - Pre 98 Admits

45.00

0.00

-100.0%

 

 

 

WOU:

 

 

 

Technology - All

84

120

42.9%

Schedule 3

Total Tuition and Fees Recommendations
Full-Time Student
2000-01 Academic Year Annual Amounts

 

1999-2000

2000-2001

% Change

EOU

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

3,366

3,387

0.6%

Undergraduate Nonresident

3,366

3,387

0.6%

Graduate Resident

5,649

5,910

4.6%

Graduate Nonresident

9,870

10,353

4.9%

 

 

 

OIT

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

3,378

3,459

2.4%

Undergraduate Nonresident

11,436

12,075

5.6%

Graduate Resident

5,535

5,865

6.0%

Graduate Nonresident

9,786

10,341

5.7%

 

 

 

OSU

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

3,561

3,654

2.6%

Undergraduate Nonresident

12,405

13,104

5.6%

Graduate Resident

6,501

6,891

6.0%

Graduate Nonresident

11,073

11,703

5.7%

 

 

 

PSU

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

3,468

3,525

1.6%

Undergraduate Nonresident

11,661

12,291

5.4%

Graduate Resident

6,292.50

6,519

3.6%

Graduate Nonresident

10,765.50

11,127

3.4%

 

 

 

SOU

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

3,234

3,369

4.2%

Undergraduate Nonresident

9,897

10,515

6.2%

Graduate Resident

5,460

5,844

7.0%

Graduate Nonresident

9,714

10,323

6.3%

 

 

 

UO

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

3,810

3,819

0.2%

Undergraduate Nonresident

13,197

13,839

4.9%

Graduate Resident

6,750

7,056

4.5%

Graduate Nonresident

11,409

11,958

4.8%

 
WOU

 

 

 

Undergraduate Resident

3,276

3,342

2.0%

Undergraduate Nonresident

10,293

10,860

5.5%

Graduate Resident

5,502

5,817

5.7%

Graduate Nonresident

9,756

10,296

5.5%

 

 

 

Specific Institution Programs

 

 

 

OIT Metro U/G Resident *

2,757

2,793

1.3%

OIT Metro U/G Nonresident *

10,815

11,409

5.5%

OIT Metro Grad Resident *

4,914

5,199

5.8%

OIT Metro Grad Nonresident *

9,165

9,675

5.6%

 

 

 

OSU MBA Resident

6,891

7,281

5.7%

OSU MBA Nonresident

12,018

12,648

5.2%

OSU Engineering U/G Resident

3,981

4,104

3.1%

OSU Engineering U/G Nonresident

12,825

13,554

5.7%

OSU Engineering Grad Resident

6,921

7,341

6.1%

OSU Engineering Grad Nonresident

11,493

12,153

5.7%

OSU Pharm D Resident-4-yr Prog.

7,677

8,127

5.9%

OSU Pharm D Nonresident-4-yr Prog.

15,567

16,431

5.6%

OSU Pharmacy U/G Resident

6,837

7,101

3.9%

OSU Pharmacy U/G Nonresident

15,681

16,551

5.5%

OSU PharmD Resident

9,777

10,338

5.7%

OSU PharmD Nonresident

14,349

15,150

5.6%

OSU Vet Med Resident

10,275

10,880

5.9%

OSU Vet Med Nonresident

20,058

21,159

5.5%

OSU Honors College U/G Resident

3,561

3,729

4.7%

OSU Honors College U/G Nonresident

12,405

13,179

6.2%

OSU Honors College Grad Resident

6,501

6,966

7.2%

OSU Honors College Grad Nonresident

11,073

11,778

6.4%

 

 

 

PSU Business - Undergrad Resident

3,468.00

3,675

6.0%

PSU Business - Undergrad Nonresident

11,661.00

12,441

6.7%

PSU MBA Grad Resident

6,652.50

6,879

3.4%

PSU MBA Grad Nonresident

11,125.50

11,487

3.2%

PSU Engineering U/G Resident

3,858.00

3,975

3.0%

PSU Engineering U/G Nonresident

12,051.00

12,741

5.7%

PSU Engineering Grad Resident

6,682.50

6,969

4.3%

PSU Engineering Grad Nonresident

11,155.50

11,577

3.8%

 

 

 

SOU MBA Grad Resident

5,760

6,144

6.7%

SOU MBA Grad Nonresident

10,164

10,773

6.0%

SOU MM Grad Resident

5,775

6,159

6.6%

SOU MM Grad Nonresident

10,164

10,773

6.0%

SOU M Mental Health Counseling Res

5,480

6,843

24.9%

SOU M Mental Health Counseling Nonres

9,714

11,322

16.6%

SOU M Group Facil & Train'g Resident

5,460

6,345

16.2%

SOU M Group Facil & Train'g Nonresident

9,714

10,824

11.4%

 

 

 

 

UO CBA U/G Resident

4,110

4,119

0.2%

UO CBA U/G Nonresident

13,497

14,139

4.8%

UO CBA Grad Resident

8,250

8,556

3.7%

UO CBA Grad Nonresident

12,909

13,458

4.3%

UO Arch/Landscape Arch U/G Resident

3,900

3,909

0.2%

UO Arch/Landscape Arch U/G Nonres

13,287

13,929

4.8%

UO Arch/Landscape Arch Grad Res

6,840

7,146

4.5%

UO Arch/Landscape Arch Grad Nonres

11,499

12,048

4.8%

UO NonSci A&Sci U/G& Undecl'd Res

3,810

3,909

2.6%

UO NonSci A&Sci U/G& Undecl'd Nonres

13,197

13,929

5.5%

UO Science U/G Resident

3,810

3,969

4.2%

UO Science U/G Nonresident

13,197

13,989

6.0%

UO Law Resident

10,898

11,204

2.8%

UO Law Nonresident

14,844

15,356

3.4%

UO Honors Coll Res U/G '97 admits

3,960

3,969

0.2%

UO Honors Coll Nonres U/G '97 admits

13,347

13,989

4.8%

UO Honors Coll Grad Res '97 admits

6,900

7,206

4.4%

UO Honors Coll U/G Nonres '97 admits

11,559

12,108

4.8%

UO Honors Coll Res U/G '99 admits

4,110

4,119

0.2%

UO Honors Coll Nonres U/G '99 admits

13,497

14,139

4.8%

UO Honors Coll Grad Res '99 admits

7,050

7,356

4.3%

UO Honors Coll U/G Nonres '99 admits

11,709

12,258

4.7%

Note: Tuition and Fees includes tuition, resource, building, incidental, and health service fees at all institutions, plus the Recreation Center fee for UO students.

* At the OIT Metro Center only the instruction fee, building fee, and a special $6 annual incidental fee are mandatory; other fees are optional.

Schedule 4

Resident Undergraduate Tuition and Fees
Comparing Relative Increases
With and Without a 5.25 Percent Tuition Fee Increase

 


1999-00 Total Tuition & Fees



Proposed
2000-01
Tuition& Fees
(with tuition freeze)


Percent
Increase 99-00 to 00-01

Tuition & Fees
2000-01
@ 5.25%
Increase
(if no freeze existed)

Percent
Increase 99-00 to 00-01

 

 

 

 

 

 

EOU

3,366

3,387

0.6%

3,504

4.1%

OIT

3,378

3,459

2.4%

3,594

6.4%

OSU

3,561

3,654

2.6%

3,795

6.6%

PSU

3,468

3,525

1.6%

3,666

5.7%

SOU

3,234

3,369

4.2%

3,501

8.3%

UO

3,810

3,819

0.2%

3,960

3.9%

WOU

3,276

3,342

2.0%

3,474

6.0%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schedule 5

Oregon Department of Higher Education

Comparison of Basic Residence Hall Rates 1999-00 to 2000-01
The following are comparative samples of board and room rates for a basic dorm room with double occupancy and the student on a 19 meal per week plan. Each institution offers a variety of room and meal options at rates above and below these listed. Please refer to the Academic Year Fee Book for a more definitive schedule of rates.

 

1999-2000

1999-2000

% Change

Eastern Oregon University

 

 

Basic multiple, 19 meals

4,615

4,830

4.70%

 

 

 

Oregon Institute of Technology

 

 

Basic multiple, 19 meals

4,839

5,123

5.90%

 

 

 

Oregon State University

 

 

Basic multiple, 19 meals

5,295

5,548

4.80%

 

 

 

Southern Oregon University

 

 

Basic multiple, 19 meals

4,928

5,136

4.20%

 

 

 

University of Oregon

 

 

Basic multiple, 19 meals

5,690

5,917

4.00%

 

 

 

Western Oregon University

 

 

Basic multiple, 19 meals

4,695

4,897

4.30%

Schedule 6 (A)

Annual Tuition and Fees in Representative Institutions - 2000-01*
In Descending Order of Resident Undergraduate 2000-01 Rate

Selected Comparator Public Colleges/Universities in the West


Institutions


Year

Res U/Grad

Nonres
U/Grad

Res
Grad

Nonres
Grad

 

 

 

Eastern Oregon University

2000-01

3,387

3,387

5,910

10,353

 

1999-00

3,366

3,366

5,649

9,870

 

% Change

0.6%

0.6%

4.6%

4.9%

 
Southern Oregon University

2000-01

3,369

10,515

5,844

10,323

 

1999-00

3,234

9,897

5,460

9,714

 

% Change

4.2%

6.2%

7.0%

6.3%

 
Western Oregon University

2000-01

3,342

10,860

5,817

10,296

 

1999-00

3,276

10,293

5,502

9,756

 

% Change

2.0%

5.5%

5.7%

5.5%

 
Western Washington University

2000-01

3,103

10,357

4,813

14,110

 

1999-00

2,991

9,993

4,641

13,617

 

% Change

3.7%

3.6%

3.7%

3.6%

 
Eastern Montana College

2000-01

3,052

8,228

3,494

8,670

 

1999-00

2,921

7,884

3,344

8,329

 

% Change

4.5%

4.4%

4.5%

4.1%

 
Boise State University

2000-01

2,450

8,450

3,048

9,048

 

1999-00

2,644

8,524

3,216

9,096

 

% Change

-7.3%

-0.9%

-5.2%

-0.5%

 
Northern Arizona University

2000-01

2,346

8,778

2,346

8,778

 

1999-00

2,259

8,375

2,259

8,375

 

% Change

3.9%

4.8%

3.9%

4.8%

 
University of Hawaii, Hilo

2000-01

2,330

7,898

4,082

10,010

 

1999-00

2,330

7,898

4,082

10,010

 

% Change

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

 
Western State College Colorado

2000-01

2,290

8,039

-

-

 

1999-00

2,221

7,733

-

-

 

% Change

3.1%

4.0%

--

--

 
Chico State University

2000-01

2,030

7,934

2,108

6,536

 

1999-00

1,994

7,898

2,072

6,500

 

% Change

1.8%

0.5%

1.7%

0.6%

 
Western New Mexico University

2000-01

1,944

7,080

2,064

7,200

 

1999-00

1,768

6,456

1,888

6,576

 

% Change

10.0%

9.7%

9.3%

9.5%

* NOTE: Many of the 2000-01 numbers are tentative pending approval by policy setting body.

Schedule 6(B)

Selected Comparator Public Universities in the West



Institutions

Year

Res U/Grad

Nonres
U/Grad

Res
Grad

Nonres
Grad

 
University of California, Berkeley

2000-01

4,046

14,660

4,268

14,702

 

1999-00

4,190

13,758

4,416

13,800

 

% Change

-3.4%

6.6%

-3.4%

6.5%

 
University of Oregon

2000-01

3,819

13,839

7,056

11,958

 

1999-00

3,810

13,197

6,750

11,409

 

% Change

0.2%

4.9%

4.5%

4.8%

 
Washington State University

2000-01

3,794

10,680

5,790

13,986

 

1999-00

3,530

10,564

5,494

13,390

 

% Change

7.5%

1.1%

5.4%

4.5%

 
University of Washington

2000-01

3,762

12,453

5,745

14,283

 

1999-00

3,639

12,030

5,583

13,872

 

% Change

3.4%

3.5%

2.9%

3.0%

 
Univ of California Los Angeles

2000-01

3,683

14,297

4,504

14,938

 

1999-00

3,683

13,857

4,405

14,399

 

% Change

0.0%

3.2%

2.2%

3.7%

 
Oregon State University

2000-01

3,654

13,104

6,891

11,703

 

1999-00

3,561

12,405

6,501

11,073

 

% Change

2.6%

5.6%

6.0%

5.7%

 
Portland State University

2000-01

3,525

12,291

6,519

11,127

 

1999-00

3,468

11,661

6,293

10,766

 

% Change

1.6%

5.4%

3.6%

3.4%

 
University of Montana

2000-01

3,292

8,958

3,458

9,300

 

1999-00

2,911

8,020

3,286

8,890

 

% Change

13.1%

11.7%

5.2%

4.6%

 
University of Colorado, Boulder

2000-01

3,242

16,022

4,044

15,810

 

1999-00

3,414

16,194

4,216

15,982

 

% Change

-5.0%

-1.1%

-4.1%

-1.1%

 
Colorado State University

2000-01

3,183

16,489

3,340

15,612

 

1999-00

3,093

15,855

3,246

15,012

 

% Change

2.9%

4.0%

2.9%

4.0%

 
University of Hawaii, Manoa

2000-01

3,156

9,636

3,156

7,602

 

1999-00

3,141

9,621

3,144

7,590

 

% Change

0.5%

0.2%

0.4%

0.2%

 
University of Alaska, Fairbanks

2000-01

3,030

6,966

4,038

7,126

 

1999-00

2,755

6,384

4,000

7,180

 

% Change

10.0%

9.1%

1.0%

-0.8%

 
University of New Mexico

2000-01

2,794

10,548

3,044

10,834

 

1999-00

-- Data not Available --

 

% Change

--

--

--

--

 
University of Wyoming

2000-01

2,576

7,694

3,116

8,198

 

1999-00

-- Data not Available --

 

% Change

--

--

--

--

 
University of Idaho

2000-01

2,476

8,476

3,016

9,016

 

1999-00

2,348

8,348

2,888

8,888

 

% Change

5.5%

1.5%

4.4%

1.4%

 
University of Alaska, Southeast

2000-01

2,454

6,390

3,432

6,384

 

1999-00

2,352

6,178

3,342

6,204

 

% Change

4.3%

3.4%

2.7%

2.9%

 
University of Utah

2000-01

2,440

7,398

2,184

6,562

 

1999-00

2,351

7,118

2,104

6,812

 

% Change

3.8%

3.9%

3.8%

-3.7%

 
University of Arizona

2000-01

2,348

9,804

2,348

9,804

 

1999-00

2,259

9,411

2,259

9,411

 

% Change

3.9%

4.2%

3.9%

4.2%

 
Arizona State University

2000-01

2,348

9,804

2,348

9,804

 

1999-00

2,259

9,411

2,259

9,411

 

% Change

3.9%

4.2%

3.9%

4.2%

 
Utah State University

2000-01

2,270

6,804

2,450

7,438

 

1999-00

2,313

7,003

2,501

7,659

 

% Change

-1.9%

-2.8%

-2.0%

-2.9%

 

* NOTE: Many of the 2000-01 numbers are tentative pending approval by policy setting body.

Schedule 6 (C)Annual Tuition and Fees in Representative Institutions -2000-01*
In Descending Order of Resident Undergraduate Rate
Selected Shared Peer List of OUS Large Universities: OSU, PSU, UO



Institutions



Year

Res U/Grad

Nonres
U/Grad

Res
Grad

Nonres
Grad

 

 

 

University of Illinois Chicago

2000-01

4,780

11,244

5,412

12,456

SUNY Buffalo

2000-01

4,654

9,554

9,034

9,350

University of Memphis

2000-01

4,431

12,717

4,818

11,352

Indiana University Bloomington

2000-01

4,362

13,418

3,394

9,206

University of California, Davis

2000-01

4,072

14,686

4,591

15,025

Purdue University Main Campus

2000-01

3,872

12,904

3,872

12,904

University of Oregon

2000-01

3,819

13,839

7,056

11,958

Oregon State University

2000-01

3,654

13,104

6,891

11,703

Portland State University

2000-01

3,525

12,291

6,519

11,127

University of Colorado, Boulder

2000-01

3,242

16,022

4,044

15,810

University of Iowa

2000-01

3,204

10,966

3,750

11,420

Iowa State University

2000-01

3,132

9,974

3,678

10,390

Univ of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

2000-01

2,768

11,934

2,864

12,030

University of Arizona

2000-01

2,348

9,804

2,348

9,804

* NOTE: Many of the 2000-01 numbers are tentative pending approval by policy setting body.

Selected Shared Peer List of Small Universities: EOU, SOU, WOU



Institutions



Year

Res U/Grad

Nonres
U/Grad

Res
Grad

Nonres
Grad

 

 

 

SUNY Fredonia - NY

2000-01

4,226

9,126

4,448

6,932

Eastern Oregon University

2000-01

3,387

3,387

5,910

10,353

Southern Oregon University

2000-01

3,369

10,515

5,844

10,323

Western Oregon University

2000-01

3,342

10,860

5,817

10,296

Mary Washington - VA

2000-01

3,246

9,676

2,700

6,138

Eastern Washington Univ - WA WA

2000-01

3,015

4,698

9,816

13,383

Southern Utah University - UT

2000-01

2,066

6,438

2,000

6,336

Calif State Stanislaus - CA

2000-01

1,638

2,130

1,708

2,200

* NOTE: Many of the 2000-01 numbers are tentative pending approval by policy setting body.


2000-01 Annual Operating Campus Budget Request

The Oregon University System (OUS) 2000-01 annual operating budget is proposed below for Board consideration and approval.

ANNUAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR 2000-01

Organization of Budget Documents

This Board Docket is supplemented by the Budget Report Summary (2000-01 BRS), which contains detailed information on budget items for both enrollment-driven funding and targeted program funding through the Resource Allocation Model (RAM).

Principles and Legislative Directives

The recommended fiscal year 2000-01 initial distributions of state General Fund have been developed following the principles of the new budget model and related policies and general directions of the Board Budget and Finance Committee.

The new budget model was approved by the Board in July 1998, supported by the Governor, and endorsed and funded by the 70th Legislative Assembly in 1999. Fiscal year 2000-01 will be the second year of operations using the new allocation approach and following these guidelines:

In approving appropriations to OUS for the 1999-2001 biennium, the Legislature noted that adequate funds are included to:

Further, HB 5061 (1999 Legislative Session) contains the following Budget Notes:

Budget Note #1:

Accommodation of All Academically Qualified Resident Undergraduate Students

The approved budget shall finance all academically qualified resident undergraduate students who seek enrollment in the institutions of the Oregon University System. The Oregon University System shall distribute state General Fund dollars to the System's institutions in a manner to assure that this is the case. The institutions of the Oregon University System may, however, limit enrollments in particular programs when such limitations are warranted by limited demand for the graduates of those programs, or when existing facilities, very high costs, or accreditation requirements limit the number of students that can be effectively served.

Budget Note #2:

Full Implementation of Model in 1999-2001; CSL Roll-up Provisions for Succeeding Biennium

The Department of Higher Education shall fully implement its new budget model within the funding provided in this bill and with other appropriations that may be made to the Department in other bills this legislative session. It is the Legislature's intent that this funding not be considered part of a multi-biennium phase-in of funding for the new budget model. As such, the agency shall not request in the agency's 2001-2003 biennium CSL, any amount that includes phased-in costs or roll-ups designed to complete the implementation of the new model. This does not preclude the inclusion in CSL of cost changes as allowed generally for other state agencies, and does not preclude the recommendation of new policy packages or of adjustments to the budget model if requested in the form of policy changes.

Budget Note #3:

State General Fund Support for OWEN; Emergency Board Approval Required for Allocation of Funds

The Subcommittee noted that the Department of Higher Education budget includes $1,630,000 of General Fund in direct support of the Oregon Wide Area Network (OWEN) project, and noted that revenue for OWEN may also be available to the Department from the Public Access Account established under SB 622. The Subcommittee removed $1,630,000 of General Fund from the Department's budget and transferred this amount to a special purpose appropriation to the Emergency Board. The Department of Higher Education may request an allocation of these funds from the Emergency Board in the event that projected 1999-2001 biennium revenues for OWEN from the Public Access Account are less than $1,630,000. The amount of the request shall not exceed the difference between the amount of the projection and $1,630,000. Any portion of the special purpose appropriation that remains unallocated on November 1, 2000 will become available to the Emergency Board for any purpose for which the Emergency Board may lawfully allocate funds.

STATE GENERAL FUND: $756.5 MILLION

The 2000-01 Budget Report Summary contains a listing of 1999 Legislative actions reflecting the 1999-2001 biennial state General Fund appropriation for operations, debt service, compensation adjustments, and capital construction ($756.5 million). For fiscal year 1999-00, approximately $377.2 million of this amount was initially allocated, leaving approximately $379.3 million to be allocated in fiscal year 2000-01. This funding split between fiscal years assumes that the majority of state General Fund for capital construction ($15.8 million) will be expended in the first year of the biennium.

Several state General Fund appropriation items were directed to specific purposes including the Agricultural Experiment Station, Extension Service and Forest Research Laboratory. Several other items required Emergency Board review and approval prior to release of funds.

1999-2001 Emergency Board Appropriations

The following Emergency Board items are part of the 1999-2001 biennial budget:

General Fund

Oregon Wide Area Network (OWEN) $1,630,000
Oregon Engineering Education and Investment Fund (EEIF) 5,000,000
1999-00 Performance Funds 730,000
Smart Jitney Project 1,500,000
Compensation Adjustments 11,400,000

In June 2000, the Emergency Board acted on release of a reduced state General Fund appropriation for OWEN. This reduction from $1,630,000 to $1,042,095 is due to the availability of Public Access Funds, the special account established by SB 622. The exhibit below shows the 1999-2001 budgeted funds for OWEN in accordance with the Emergency Board's actions.

Funding Source

1999-00

2000-01

State General Fund

$521,047

$521,048

Other Funds Limited

293,953

293,952

Total

$815,000

$815,000

To date, the Emergency Board has not approved the distribution of the 1999-00 Performance Funds.

Adjustments in 2000-01 RAM

The recommended fiscal year 2000-01 initial distributions have been developed following the general directions of the Board Budget and Finance Committee. The following adjustments are included in the fiscal year 2000-01 budget:

Other adjustments to systemwide expenses and programs are detailed in the 2000-01 BRS.

2000-01 INITIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF STATE GENERAL FUND

2000-01 OUS Budget Report Summary

The 2000-01 OUS Budget Report Summary (2000-01 BRS) addended to this document includes specific and detailed information related to the initial 2000-01 distribution of state General Fund under the new resource allocation model. The 2000-01 BRS is a reference document intended for use by campus and Chancellor's Office staff and may be updated from time to time.

2000-01 Total State General Fund Distribution.

The exhibit below summarizes proposed state General Fund distributions for fiscal year 2000-01 as detailed in Charts A and B:

PROPOSED 2000-01 STATE GENERAL FUND DISTRIBUTIONS
(dollars in millions)



Method of Distribution:

Total Proposed FY
Distribution

Distributed to Institutions via Cells (Chart A)

$ 255.6

Distributed to Institutions via Targeted Programs (Chart A)

36.7

Balance for Remaining Targeted Programs and Other (Chart B)

87.0

Total 2000-01 Distributions

$379.3

The chart below (Chart A) summarizes initial state General Fund allocations for both enrollment and Targeted Programs for each of the seven campuses. Additional detailed information concerning Targeted Programs is included in the 2000-01 BRS.

CHART A - 2000-01 Initial Distributions of State General Fund

(Including Distribution on Fundable Student Enrollments
and Targeted Programs)*

 



2000-01 State General Fund
Distribution
Based on annual FTE Enrollment
(Subject to Settle-up Process)

Targeted Programs Distribution



Total State General Fund 2000-01 Initial Distribution

Targeted Subject to a
Settle-up Process

Other Targeted*

Total Targeted

 

A

B

C

D

A+D

EOU

$9,065,379

$65,063

$4,264,145

$4,329,208

$13,394,587

OIT

9,066,150

100,129

6,917,978

7,018,107

16,084,257

OSU**

78,795,856

536,751

11,127,540

11,664,291

90,460,147

PSU

61,607,183

367,949

4,085,701

4,453,650

66,060,833

SOU

16,654,280

414,672

2,379,097

2,793,769

19,448,049

UO

64,295,548

494,986

4,676,366

5,171,352

69,466,900

WOU

16,075,326

211,754

1,067,142

1,278,896

17,354,222

Total

$255,559,722

$2,191,304

$34,517,969

$36,709,273

$292,268,996

* Includes EEIF funds as distributed to campuses.
** Excludes $47,739,144 for Statewide Public Service Programs (AES, ES, FRL); please refer to Chart B.

Initial Distributions of State General Fund Based on Fundable Student Enrollments: $255,559,722 (See Chart A)

State General Fund is allocated to campuses on a per-capita cell-by-cell basis using April 2000 OUS Institutional Research Services enrollment projections as confirmed by campus officials. The April 2000 enrollment projections reflect recruitment and retention trends identified in fall 1999 enrollment data. (The details of the April 2000 enrollment projections are included in the 2000-01 BRS.) A display of the enrollment-driven matrix and cell values is included in the 2000-01 BRS. The following are adjustments that have been made to the cell values:

Funding for the following items is included in the $255,559,722 to be distributed through the student enrollment-driven matrix (cells) in 2000-01 (please refer to Chart A):

The 2000-01 BRS 1) sets out the initial 2000-01 allocations of state General Fund based on April 2000 student enrollment projections; 2) sets out the annual FTE student enrollment numbers based on April 2000 three-term average FTE enrollment projections adjusted for continuing education and summer session (extended enrollment); and 3) summarizes all settle-up policies related to 2000-01 distributions through the cell values.

State General Fund Support of Targeted Programs Subject to Initial Distribution to Campuses in 2000-01 Operating Budgets: $36,709,273 (see Chart A)

Chart A in this document summarizes the initial State General Fund amounts to be distributed to campuses under Targeted Programs ($36,709,273). As noted in Chart A, some targeted programs contain elements that are enrollment driven and, as such, are subject to a settle-up process ($2,191,304) while other targeted programs (totaling $34,517,969) are not enrollment driven and, consequently, not subject to settle-up. The 2000-01 BRS includes a complete listing and detailed explanations of the types of Targeted Programs supported by state General Fund appropriations for 2000-01. A Board Reserve of $2,190,852 is available as carry-forward from 1999-00 and is set aside to address unanticipated System needs in accordance with provisions outlined in the 2000-01 BRS. Additionally, an undistributed FTE enrollment reserve of $925,541 for year-two settle-up is budgeted due to uncertain/unpredictable fluctuations in program enrollments.

Balance of State General Fund Distributions: $87,008,070 (See Chart B)

As shown in Chart A, it is proposed that $292.3 million of the $379.3 million of state General Fund available for 2000-01 be distributed on an initial basis to institutions through the enrollment-driven component of the model and through specific Targeted Programs, some of which have enrollment-driven elements. The balance of approximately $87 million for 2000-01 is to be distributed as follows:

CHART B - 2000-01 Balance of State General Fund Distributions



Operating budget

State General Fund



Comments

Remaining Targeted Programs:
Agricultural Experiment Station (AES) - OSU

$26,859,266

HB 5061 and SB 5543*
Extension Services (ES) - OSU

18,325,564

HB 5061 and SB 5543*
Forest Research Laboratory (FRL) - OSU

2,554,314

HB 5061 and SB 5543*
New Community College Partnerships-To Be Allocated

439,613

$95,000 for SWOUC
Other Collaborative Programs-To Be Allocated

562,705

$250,000 for COUC
OHSU Education Assistance

300,000

 
Central Services

 

Systemwide Programs and Expenses include: NET II subsidy, statewide assessments, WICHE, Services to Students with Disabilities, COP expenses, & Pass Program; Faculty Diversity, and Oregon Joint Schools of Professional Business programs.
             Chancellor's Office

12,782,626

             OCECS

 

Operations

2,328,828

Oregon Joint Graduate Schools of Engineering (OJGSE)

892,000

EEIF (to be distributed)**

1,824,594

Systemwide Programs and Expenses

7,872,333

Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE) unallocated

20,438

 
Internship Program

263,768

 
Other State General Fund Distributions
Legislative Emergency Board Appropriation

730,000

1999-00 Campus Performance
Legislative Emergency Board Appropriation

521,048

OWEN Network 2000-01 only
Legislative Emergency Board Appropriation

1,260,000

Smart Jitney Project
RAM Board Reserve

see comment

$2,190,852 available as carry-forward from 99-00
Undistributed FTE Enrollment Reserve

925,541

 
Debt Service Requirement (Article XI-G Bonds)

8,545,432

 
TOTAL

$87,008,070

 

* An amount is included for compensation adjustments as provided by SB 5543 (state employee compensation).
**Engineering Education Investment Fund. A portion of the $5 million available for 2000-01 is allocated to OCECS for distribution.

Chart B lists Remaining Targeted Program amounts and Other State General Fund Distributions for 2000-01. The targeted program amounts include: 1) amounts that remain to be allocated such as for the new Community College Partnerships and other Collaborative Programs; 2) operating budgets for the Statewide Public Service Programs at OSU and for Central Service entities including the Chancellor's Office and the Oregon College of Engineering and Computer Sciences (OCECS); Systemwide Expenses such as the NET II (state network for instructional video) subsidy, WICHE, PASS/Pew grant match, statewide assessments, Assistance to Students with Disabilities, Certificates of Participation (COP) expenses, Faculty Diversity Initiatives, and the Oregon Joint Schools of Professional Business. Further program details are included in the 2000-01 BRS.

Other state General Fund distributions for 2000-01 listed in Chart B include the Legislative Emergency Board appropriations for the OWEN and Campus Performance funding; and additional amounts for the RAM Board Reserve and bond debt service requirements. Also included are designated amounts for the OHSU Education Assistance program and the WUE program.

2000-01 Other Funds Limited $350,626,370
(See All Sources Summary Chart C)
(Tuition and fees revenue, indirect cost recovery and special fees)

Other Funds Limited for 2000-01 includes estimated campus tuition and fees (based on April 2000 enrollment projections), indirect cost recovery on sponsored research, and special fees (e.g., resource fees, technology fees, laboratory fees, etc.).

Under the former Budget Allocation Model (BAS), the majority of tuition revenue and state General Fund dollars were pooled and then allocated by the Board to campuses and central services. Under the new resource allocation model, tuition revenue follows students by remaining with the campus generating this revenue. For campus-approved 2000-01 tuition and fee estimates, please see the 2000-01 BRS. In addition, a separate July 21, 2000, Board docket provides complete information on the 2000-01 academic year fees.

2000-01 Non-Limited Other Funds: $749,383,564 (See All Sources Summary Chart C)

Campus Non-Limited Other Funds revenue includes sponsored programs, gifts, grants, and contracts; designated operations (e.g., community workshops and other self-sustaining public service and education activities); and auxiliary activities such as student housing, food service, parking, athletics, and incidental fee activities. Details of campus approved Non-Limited Other Funds estimates are included in the 2000-01 BRS.

2000-01 State Sports Action Lottery Funds: $2,443,046
(See All Sources Summary Chart C). For 2000-01, the Chancellor's Office will distribute state Sports Action Lottery Funds in accordance with established Board policy.

The biennial total amount for Sports Action Lottery Funds is $4,866,092. These funds are distributed to campuses with 12% allocated for scholarships and 88% allocated for support of intercollegiate athletics.

2000-01 OREGON UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OPERATING BUDGET, ALL SOURCES

Chart C summarizes the 2000-01 initial operating budget for all campuses and central services. The amounts included in Chart C are based on projected 2000-01 Annual FTE.

CHART C -- 2000-01 OUS OPERATING BUDGET
ALL SOURCES

 

State General Fund

Other Funds Limited

Non-Limited Other Funds

Lottery Funds

2000-01
Total All Funds

Institutions (Enrollment & Targeted Distributions):

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Oregon University

13,394,587

7,027,594

9,483,307

 

29,905,488

Oregon Institute of Technology

16,084,257

7,298,121

13,148,898

 

36,531,276

Oregon State University 1

90,460,147

95,479,395

256,400,000

 

442,339,542

Portland State University

66,060,833

67,300,000

119,978,683

 

253,339,516

Southern Oregon University

19,448,049

16,807,761

23,732,201

 

59,988,011

University of Oregon

69,466,900

116,408,858

205,519,168

 

391,394,926

Western Oregon University

17,354,222

14,934,156

41,109,000

 

73,397,378

Sports Action - To Be Allocated

 

 

 

2,443,046

2,443,046

Subtotal Institutions2

292,268,995

325,255,885

669,371,257

2,443,046

1,289,339,183

Statewide Public Services:

 

 

 

 

-

Agricultural Experiment Station

26,859,266

7,342,726

24,500,000

 

58,701,992

Extension Service

18,325,564

10,984,317

7,930,000

 

37,239,881

Forest Research Laboratory

2,554,314

5,049,170

11,172,000

 

18,775,484

Subtotal Statewide Public Services

47,739,144

23,376,213

43,602,000

-

114,717,357

 

 

 

 

 

 

Central Services:

 

 

 

 

-

Chancellor's Office

12,782,626

1,342,320

690,000

 

14,814,946

OCECS - Operations

2,328,828

358,000

200,000

 

2,886,828

OCECS -- EEIF To Be Allocated 3

1,824,594

-

 

 

1,824,594

OCECS -- OJGSE

892,000

 

 

 

892,000

Systemwide Expense and Programs - TBA

7,872,333

 

 

 

7,872,333

Subtotal Central Services

25,700,381

1,700,320

890,000

-

28,290,701

 

 

 

 

 

-

Targeted Programs - To Be Allocated:

 

 

 

 

-

New Community College Partnerships-TBA

439,613

 

 

 

439,613

Other Collaborative Programs - TBA

562,705

 

 

 

562,705

OHSU Educational Assistance

300,000

 

 

 

300,000

WUE Program

20,438

 

 

 

20,438

Internship Program

263,768

 

 

 

263,768

Subtotal Targeted Programs - TBA

1,586,524

-

-

-

1,586,524

 

 

 

 

 

-

Other:

 

 

 

 

 

RAM Board Reserve 5

-

 

 

 

-

Undistributed FTE Enrollment Reserve

925,541

 

 

 

925,541

E-Board Actions:

 

 

 

 

-

Legislative Emergency Board (99-00 Performance Funding)

730,000

 

 

 

730,000

Legislative Emergency Board (Smart Jitney)

1,260,000

 

 

 

1,260,000

Legislative Emergency Board (OWEN)

521,048

293,952

 

 

815,000

Debt Service Requirement

8,545,432

 

35,520,307

 

44,065,739

Subtotal Other

11,982,021

293,952

35,520,307

-

47,796,280

 

 

 

 

 

 

2000-01 TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET

379,277,065

350,626,370

749,383,564

2,443,046

1,481,730,045

Capital Construction 4

-

 

 

 

-

2000-01 TOTAL WITH CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION

379,277,065

350,626,370

749,383,564

2,443,046

1,481,730,045


1
Excludes $47,739,144 for Statewide Public Service Programs (AES, ES, FRL).
2 Other Funds Limited for institutions include tuition revenue reported at gross level including graduate assistant fee remissions & other fee remissions.
3 The Engineering Education Investment Fund balance of $3,175,406 for 2000-01 is included in institution distributions.
4 100% Capital Construction funding was budgeted in 1999-00.
5 $2,190,852 available as carry-forward from 1999-00 RAM Board Reserve.

1999-2001 Budget Balance Sheet

Chart D sets out the 1999-2001 Legislatively Adopted budget and estimated 1999-2001 Board Budget allocations. As indicated, it is estimated at this time that additional Other Funds limitation will be required for the biennium. This is due primarily to an OUS accounting change effective July 1, 2000, requiring institutions that grant tuition/fee remissions to reflect gross rather than net tuition as revenue received and to treat all fee remissions as expenditures.

Oregon University System 1999-2001 Budget Balance Sheet

 

 

 

 

 

State
General Fund

Other Funds
Limited

Total

   

 

 

Authorized Biennial Budget  

 

 

 
Legislatively Adopted Budget  

 

 

OUS Operations

$609,523,250

$602,190,602

$1,211,713,852

Agricultural Experiment Station

52,452,877

14,489,463

66,942,340

Extension Service

35,609,750

21,605,116

57,214,866

Forest Research Laboratory

5,005,129

9,945,139

14,950,268

Debt Service

18,317,636

 

18,317,636

Capital Construction

15,866,476

126,696,198

142,562,674

Total Legislatively Adopted Budget:

736,775,118

774,926,518

1,511,701,636

 
Emergency Board Appropriations:  

 

 

Engineering Education Investment Fund (EEIF)

$5,000,000

 

$5,000,000

Employee Compensation

11,400,000

1,072,311

12,472,311

Smart Jitney

1,500,000

 

1,500,000

OWEN

1,042,095

587,905

1,630,000

Performance Funds*

730,000

 

730,000

E-Board Request and 1st Year Adjustments

 

13,645,965

13,645,965

Total Legislatively Authorized Budget:

756,447,213

790,232,699

1,546,679,912

 
 

State

General Fund

Other Funds

Limited

Total

 
1999-2001 Board Budget Allocations  

 

 

 
Institutions (FTE and targeted)

$568,121,102

$613,175,428

$1,181,296,530

Statewide Public Services

94,707,950

$46,398,848

141,106,798

Central Services1

51,664,169

3,374,320

55,038,489

Targeted Programs - To Be Allocated

2,881,392

 

2,881,392

OWEN

1,042,095

587,905

1,630,000

RAM Board Reserve

2,190,852

 

2,190,852

Debt Service

18,317,636

 

18,317,636

Capital Construction

15,866,476

126,696,198

142,562,674

Undistributed FTE Enrollment Reserve

925,541

 

925,541

Performance Funds - 1999-00

730,000

 

730,000

Total 1999-2001 OUS Budget Allocations

756,447,213

790,232,699

1,546,679,912

 
Balance / (Over) Authorized Budget

$0

$0

$0

 
Notes: 1 Includes Chancellor's Office/OCECS/Systemwide Expenses and Programs and Smart Jitney.

* Not Yet Released by E-Board

Comparison of 2000-01 Budgeted FTE Enrollment to 1999-00 Budgeted Annual FTE Enrollment.

Chart E below presents a comparison of total annual FTE (fundable and non-fundable) as used in the new resource allocation model, including summer session and continuing education estimates. Enrollment projections of fall base headcount and three-term average FTE enrollments are developed by the Chancellor's Office/Institutional Research Services in cooperation with campuses. These projections are then converted for use in the model (45 credit hours for undergraduate, 36 credit hours for master's, and 27 credit hours for doctoral students). A breakdown of fundable vs. non-fundable OUS FTE is included in the 2000-01 BRS in connection with enrollment-driven state General Fund allocations.

CHART E - OUS Comparative Budgeted Annual FTE Enrollment
Total Budgeted Annual FTE Enrollment

By Institution

Budgeted
1999-00

Budgeted
2000-01



Annual FTE Change



Percent Change



Annual FTE

April 2000
Annual FTE

Eastern Oregon University

2,046

2,201

155

7.6%

Oregon Institute of Technology

2,210

2,155

(55)

(2.5%)

Oregon State University

15,427

16,450

1,023

6.6%

Portland State University

13,679

14,588

909

6.6%

Southern Oregon University

4,410

4,718

308

7.0%

University of Oregon

17,527

17,164

(363)

(2.1%)

Western Oregon University

4,284

4,187

(97)

(2.3%)

Total Annual FTE

59,583

61,463

1,880

3.2%

1999-00 Settle-up

The 2000-01 BRS contains a section detailing funding and FTE at final 1999-00 settle-up for all institutions.

TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENTS

The Board of Higher Education approves the travel reimbursement rates for employees, as well as non-employees serving OUS campuses. Attachment A provides travel reimbursement rates as recommended for 2000-01 to be effective the first day of the month following Board approval.

STAFF RECOMMENDATION TO THE BOARD

Staff recommends that the Board Committee on Budget and Finance recommend for approval by the full Board: (1) The proposed Annual Operating Budget and allocations for 2000-01 as described in this docket, with corresponding details provided in the 2000-01 OUS Budget Report Summary (2000-01 BRS); (2) continue the policies governing the new model (adopted in September 1999) as relating to all previous budget allocations of state General Fund and /or other resources indicating that only those items specifically identified as part of the 2000-01 Targeted Programs will be covered in year-two of implementation and added targeted program items may only be included by Board consideration and resolution; (3) delegate authority to the Chancellor to make adjustments to the OUS Annual Operating Budget for 2000-01 as required; and (4) approve the proposed 2000-01 travel reimbursement rates as summarized in Attachment A.


OREGON UNIVERSITY SYSTEM

Travel Reimbursement Rates Summary
Effective September 1, 2000
Proposal

In-State Meals & Incidental Expenses, Lodging Standard: Per diem using OUS High-Low classification. Ashland, Bend, Portland metropolitan area, and Oregon coastal communities are classified as "high." All other Oregon cities are classified as "low." For "low" cities, the per diem for meals and incidental expenses is $34 and lodging (including tax) is $77. For "high" cities the per diem for meals and incidental expenses is $34 and lodging (including tax) is $85. No receipts required for lodging, meals and incidental expenses.


Exception (e.g., conferences):
(1) Conference: Per diem for meals and incidental expenses of $34 and lodging at actual and reasonable cost. Lodging receipts required. Deductions required for meals provided. Institutional policy applies regarding pre-approvals. (2) Portland: Institutional policy applies regarding exceptions for reimbursement of lodging at actual and reasonable cost for the Portland Metropolitan area, lodging receipts required.
Out-of-State Continental U.S. Meals & Incidental Expenses, Lodging Standard: Per diem using Federal High-Low Schedule. Cities are classified as either "low," with meals and incidental expenses of $32 and lodging (including tax) of $90, or classified as "high," with meals and incidental expenses of $42 and lodging (including tax) of $159. No receipts required for lodging, meals and incidental expenses.

Exception (e.g., conferences): (1) Conference: Per diem for meals and incidental expenses of $42 and lodging at actual and reasonable cost. Lodging receipts required. Deductions required for meals provided. Institutional policy applies regarding pre-approvals. (2) Seattle: For the city of Seattle, Washington, an additional $14 is allowed for each overnight stay to help defray the hotel room tax.
Foreign &

Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, U.S. Possessions
Meals & Incidental Expenses, Lodging Standard: Per diem for meals and incidental expenses as well as lodging using Federal Specific Locality Table. No receipts required for lodging, meals and incidental expenses.

Exception (e.g., conferences): Per diem for meal and incidental expenses using Federal Specific Locality Table and lodging at actual and reasonable cost. Lodging receipts required. Deductions required for meals provided. Institutional policy applies regarding pre-approvals.
Private Vehicle Mileage   Reimburse at $.32 per mile.
Proration of Meals and Incidental Expenses Per Diem for Partial Days Involving an Overnight Stay: On the day the trip begins, the traveler is eligible for 100% of the per diem if the trip begins before 12 p.m. (noon), or is eligible for 50% if the trip begins after 12 p.m. (noon). On the day the trip concludes, the traveler is eligible for 100% of the per diem if the trip concludes after 6 p.m., or is eligible for 50% if the trip concludes before 6 p.m.
Allocation of Meals & Incidental Expenses Per Diem: When a deduction is necessary for meals provided, the proration shall be: breakfast 25%, lunch 25%, and dinner 50%.
Incidental Expenses: Incidental expenses are combined with meals into a single rate. The term "incidental expenses" includes, but is not limited to, fees and gratuities for services, such as for waiters and baggage handlers. The term does not include taxicab fares, airport shuttle bus fares, telephone calls, and facsimiles.
Miscellaneous Expenses: The term "miscellaneous expenses" includes, but is not limited to, parking, telephone calls, facsimiles, taxicab fares, airport shuttle fares, tolls. No receipts are required for taxicab fares, airport shuttle fares, and tolls or for any other miscellaneous expenses of $25 or less per item. All miscellaneous expenses must be itemized.
Vehicle Rentals: Receipts are required for vehicle rentals.
Non-commercial Lodging: When using non-commercial facilities, the per diem for lodging is $25.


Oregon State Board of Higher Education
Board Committee on Budget and Finance
June 16, 2000

Minutes

Board Committee: Tom Imeson, chair, David Koch, Geri Richmond, Don VanLuvanee, and Bill Williams

OUS Presidents or senior administrative staff: President Phil Creighton, EOU; President Martha Anne Dow, OIT; President Paul Risser, OSU; President Dan Bernstine, PSU; President Steve Reno, SOU; President Dave Frohnmayer, UO; and President Betty Youngblood, WOU.

Chancellor's Office staff: Joe Cox, Chancellor; William Anslow, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration; Marilyn Lanier, Deputy Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration; Lynda Swanson, Director of Capital Construction, Planning, and Budgeting; Susan Weeks, Chief Information Officer; and Marv Wigle, Associate Vice Chancellor for Budget and Management.

Meeting participants also included other institutional representatives, other members of the Chancellor's Office staff, and interested observers.

MINUTES from May 19, 2000
David Koch made a motion to approve the May 2000 minutes as presented, it was seconded and the motion was approved.

ACTION ITEMS:

Naming of Outdoor Community Recreation Field, PSU
Portland State University requested an exception to the Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) 580-50-0025 regarding the naming of buildings after a living person. This exception would permit the University to name the new community recreation field the "Peter W. Stott Community Field" in honor of Mr. Stott, an alumnus of PSU. Mr. Stott has donated approximately $1 million to the University in support of their athletic program and has contributed, in total, over $2 million in support of the University. In addition to his support of University athletics, Mr. Stott is an energetic advocate in the community for the University and has been instrumental in securing major support for the School of Fine and Performing Arts, the School of Business Administration, and the recently completed Urban Center, home of the College of Urban and Public Affairs. Mr. Stott is the president and CEO of two Portland-based companies, and was named 1999 Oregon Entrepreneur of the Year.

Director Don VanLuvanee made a motion to approve this proposal, seconded by Director Williams, and unanimously approved.

Naming of New Distance Learning Facility, PSU
Portland State University also requested an exception to OAR 580-50-0025 to name the Distance Learning Facility at the Urban Center in honor of PSU alumni Keren Brown Wilson and Michael DeShane. Keren Brown Wilson (Ph.D., Urban Studies, 1983) and her husband Michael DeShane (Ph.D., Urban Studies, 1977) have contributed over $1 million toward the construction of the Urban Center complex, the largest private gift donated to the project. In addition to their substantial monetary donation, Drs. Wilson and DeShane have played active roles advocating for the project and assisting in generating public as well as private support. Dr. Wilson served as co-chair of the effort to raise the necessary private funds to enable the construction to proceed. Drs. Wilson and Deshane share a deep commitment to the University. They are members of the Centennial Society, a group of donors who have made deferred gift plans to benefit the University, and they sustain their membership in the President's Associates at the highest level with annual general support. Dr. Wilson is also a member of the PSU Foundation Board of Directors.

A motion was made by Director Bill Williams, seconded by Director VanLuvanee, and unanimously approved.

New Graduate Student Residence Hall, UO
The University of Oregon requested Board authorization to seek approval from the State Emergency Board for 1) construction of a new on-campus graduate student residence hall, and 2) a $4,500,000 project expenditure limitation consisting of $4,100,000 in Article XI-F(1) bonds and $400,000 of University Housing and Dining operations revenues to construct the new Graduate Student Residence Hall project. This project would provide the first new student housing added to the central campus since 1963.

University of Oregon Vice President Dan Williams advised that, after conducting studies of demand, the University concluded the additional graduate student housing will benefit the University by enabling the recruitment of more graduate students to UO and reverse the trend of declining graduate enrollment; increasing on-campus housing options for UO students; fully utilize existing housing resources (both campus land and dining facilities); and ensuring financial viability of the project and price flexibility for student rentals while increasing housing density.

Vice President Williams added that the cost is relatively inexpensive and construction is set to begin immediately and with housing available by fall 2001. Lynda Swanson, Director of Capital Construction Planning and Budgeting, advised that this project requires only Legislative approval of expenditure limitation and does not require Legislative funding; actual funding will come from residential revenues (rent).

Staff recommends that the Board approve this project and authorize the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration to seek authorization at the June 2000 Emergency Board. Director David Koch made a motion to approve the request, which was seconded by Director Bill Williams; approved and carried.

Policy Guidelines for Electronic Commerce
Controller Michael Green advised that the Oregon University System will be using electronic commerce more each year to improve and expand services to students and the public. Given the quickening pace with which electronic commerce (e-commerce) is evolving, it is necessary to provide standards to ensure the protection and integrity of data, protection of financial and confidential information about the customer, and to preserve the trust and confidence in using e-commerce. Mr. Green advised the Administrative Council has reviewed the proposed guidelines and supports the adoption of the policy.

This policy will provide a framework for consistency across all campuses and with relevant Department of Administrative Services policies, while assuring campus flexibility in business process design. The Systemwide policy states, that for purposes of the policy, e-commerce includes all business transactions accomplished using an electronic medium. In all endeavors of this type, the System shall protect the assets of the State, the integrity of the data, the financial and confidential information about the customer, and preserve the public trust and confidence in using e-commerce. This requires an appropriate combination of System and institutional management oversight, and includes sound policies, procedures, technologies, and internal controls.

Discussion:
Director Williams asked if, within the structure of policy, campuses are encouraged to add additional on-line business transactions; Green replied the policy does not name specific areas of commerce to be put on the World-Wide Web, but has room to expand and incorporate a variety of business and student services activities. Williams asked if a central committee has been established to exchange experiences among campuses and/or a process by which complaints or questions arising from the e-commerce activity would be handled. Green replied that campuses would include ways to resolve issues in their individual policies; Anslow added that most campuses currently have methods for resolution pertaining to existing forms of commerce (in person, by phone, by mail, etc.), e-commerce broadens the opportunities and provides convenience to the students. However, an ombudsman-type process may need to be incorporated (Director Williams added that conflict resolution processes should also be included in the Board systemwide policy). Williams asked if e-commerce transactions will have legal binding; Wendy Robinson, DOJ, stated the issue is whether a person can sign a contract electronically. Presently, Oregon law has a method to bind a contract by e-signatures, but there is an authentication process that has to be applied.

Anslow informed that a report developed of the Senate Bill 271 review states campuses generated savings as a result of SB 271 and the resources have been reallocated for the reorganization of student services for a "one-stop shopping" activity, to be addressed in the capital budget. Director Imeson noted that with the addition of a statement expressing the Board's desire and encouragement that the campuses move in this direction in all financial business and student service transaction areas, the policy would be approved by the Board committee; Green agreed that this would be added to the policy.

Director VanLuvanee made the motion to approve the E-Commerce policy guidelines, which was seconded and unanimously carried.

Pre-Tax Parking Plan
Controller Green advised federal tax law changes make it possible for employers to establish a pre-tax parking benefit which would enable eligible employees to pay for certain parking costs on a pre-tax basis. Authorization of this plan would provide a tax-savings opportunity for both employees and the System. Because the employees' compensation is reduced by the cost of the parking permit, the employee may pay lower federal and state income taxes as well as less FICA. At the same time, the employer's share of FICA would be correspondingly reduced. Green advised the plan is structured for an automatic implementation of the pre-tax option, with an option for the employee to opt-out. The plan has reviewed and approved by DOJ and members of the Presidents and Administrative Councils.

Director Koch asked if there are negative fiscal impacts to this proposal, and if the proposal encourages employees to drive their cars. Anslow advised that there are no negative financial impacts to the System and that OUS pays directly to the Department of Transportation for bus permits to encourage OUS employees to use alternate transportation methods. Students are assessed through their incidental fees the same incent to use public transportation. Vice President Dan Williams advised that 10-12% of Lane Transit District (LTD) is comprised of UO faculty and staff, and Oregon State and Southern Oregon Universities have similar programs.

Director Richmond declared a conflict of interest and abstained. The motion to approve the plan was made by Director Williams, seconded and carried.

Transfer of Staff Fee Privileges
On December 18, 1998, at the Board of Higher Education meeting, the Associated Oregon Faculty (AOF) representative, Professor Ron Cease (PSU), requested that the Board review OAR 580-022-0030 to "allow a reduction in tuition for faculty spouses and children." The primary purpose of this recommendation was to: (1) further higher education in the State of Oregon, (2) improve employee recruitment and retention, and (3) to attract top level faculty, administrators, and staff; thereby providing more educational opportunities. A task force of university administrators and Chancellor's Office staff was formed and recommended that the current policy be modified by allowing the employee to "transfer" the benefit to one family member per term, with a cap set at 10 credits. For purposes of the rule, family includes spouse and dependent children as defined from IRS code, and domestic partner as defined by the PEBB affidavit. Retirees will not be eligible to "transfer" this benefit. Oregon Health Science University (OHSU) employees participating in the intergovernment agreement between OUS and OHSU may not "transfer" this benefit. The modified policy would be in effect for two years, effective fall term 2000, and would be reciprocal between the Oregon public universities, with the president of the teaching institution deciding which programs are excluded from the policy modification similar to the current policy. Prior to the end of the two years, the policy will be reviewed and a report will be prepared with a recommendation to the board.

Discussion:
Anslow noted that this benefit was created to encourage educational opportunities for employees and their dependents. The existing policy was set, in part, on the assumption that if the employee was attending school full time (15 credit hours) and working full time, this would put a hardship on the employee. Since the policy is designed to "transfer" the educational benefit, two credit cap levels could not be set (i.e., 10 hrs for the employee and 15 hours for the dependent). The additional credit hours would be charged at the 11th and 12th credit hour levels. Another complicating factor is the receiving institution (teaching) has to cover the cost of this benefit.

Joe Sicotte, Associate Vice Chancellor for Human Resources, advised that a public hearing will be held through the Secretary of State office notifying the public of the modification of the OAR; however, the Board action could modify the employee benefit cap. Chancellor Cox stated there is concern that, as a result of the Secretary of State hearing, OUS would be required to extend the educational benefit to all state of Oregon employees.

A motion was made by Director VanLuvanee to approve the modification of OAR 580-022-0030 as presented by staff, to be included in the Academic year Fee Book for a two-year period beginning fall 2000; the motion was seconded by Director Koch and approved by the Board (Director Richmond abstained due to conflict of interest).

REPORT ITEMS

Purchase of Currier Property, OSU
The Oregon State University Housing and Dining Services has purchased a parcel of land within campus boundaries as part of the site to be used to build student housing apartments. The property was acquired from Raymond and Lois Currier for $94,000 plus closing costs. In keeping with OAR Division 50, Section 580-050-0015, the purchase was approved by the Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration on behalf of the Board.

Vice Chancellor Anslow noted that the Board policy cap of $100,000 should be further evaluated in the future to ascertain if the cap was consistent with market real estate costs.

Optional Retirement Plan
Controller Green and Denise Yunker, Employee Benefits Manager, provided the Board with a report of the Optional Retirement Plan (ORP). This Plan was established in 1996 to provide a portable retirement plan for faculty who often move between institutions several times during their careers. ORP offers investment choices through four mutual fund and annuity companies. This periodic review is provided to update the Board as to the status of the Plan.

ORP has had significant growth, both in funds and participation rate, in the past four years. Currently over 1,900 employees participate. Three reviews have been accomplished (1997, 1998, and 1999). In 1997, the review recommended the establishing of employee education as to investment opportunities. To accomplish this goal, ORP provided adequate investment vehicles to allow employees to achieve investment goals and benefit fairs are conducted on the campuses to educate employees on investment activity opportunities and investment strategies. The Plan has experienced improvement in investment activities over the past two years and in 1999 the review reported that the investors have become more aggressive.

If an employee leaves the plan before investiture, they forfeit the employer contribution; these forfeiture funds are available for covering a reduction of future employer contributions, restoration of non-vested employer contributions, and payment of administrative costs. Only one modification has been instituted since 1996 (which was approved in 1998); this modification allows Fund Sponsors to invest monies received without specific investment directions from participants in fixed income funds until participants made active selections. Green reported that employee appeals related to Plan administration are infrequent and minimal.

Yunker stated the statute establishing the ORP authorized the use of five vendors; however, in order to ensure adequate coverage, only four vendors were selected. Although one vendor (TIAA-CREF) has a low number of funds offered, consultants state TIAA-CREF provides adequate investment options to employees. Employee and employer contributions are the same (6% employee and 9.73% employer contribution for Tier One; for Tier Two [employed after 1996] the employee contribution rate is 9.73%) Anslow advised, however, OUS pays both the employee and employer contributions and, in many states, the employee is required to pay their portion.

Yunker advised that the ORP is an effective recruitment tool; the administration of the Plan has been stabilized; Funds Sponsors appear to be adequate, with appropriate fund choices; and the Plan appears to meet the objectives set forth in 1996 when the plan was established.

A Legislative Concept to de-link the ORP from the Public Employees Retirement System (PERS) contribution has been submitted to the Legislative Fiscal Office for submission to the legislature.

Systemwide Financial Update (through March 31, 2000)
Controller Green provided the Board with the Financial Update for first three quarters of the current fiscal year. OUS experienced increases in revenues, which were driven by enrollment increases. Fund balances are comparable with prior the year, and not-for-profit activities have experienced an increase in revenue and activities due to enrollment increases. Anslow advised that in a number of cases, due to collective bargaining processes during the year, OUS may see expenditure spikes due to employee salary increase pay-outs for the entire year paid in the last quarter. However, at the present time, all employee contracts are in place, with the exception of the PSU part-time faculty agreement.

The meeting was adjourned at 11:30 a.m.