Joint Boards Articulation Commission

Meeting Summary Notes
May 5, 1999
Public Services Building
Salem, Oregon

Members Present

Jon Carnahan, Chair, Linn-Benton Community College
      (substituting for Martha Anne Dow)
Janine Allen, Portland State University
Jim Arnold, Oregon University System
Roy Arnold, Oregon State University
Jim Buch, University of Oregon
Liz Goulard, Clackamas Community College
Judy Patterson, Oregon Department of Education
Dave Phillips, Clatsop Community College
Elaine Yandle-Roth, Office of Community College Services

Guests Present

Dennis Gilbert, Lane Community College (via phone)
Marylee King, Marylhurst University (via phone)


Jon Carnahan called the meeting to order at 10:10 a.m.

1. Announcements

J. Arnold reviewed the contents of the packet of materials sent to JBAC members. The mailing included the latest version of the table outlining general education requirements for OUS institutions as well as a report to the Legislature in response to SB 919.

In April, the OUS provosts postponed a discussion of the general education requirements matrix until their next (May) meeting.

The SB 919 report has a section on course and credit transfer that is an abbreviated version of the JBAC's own report prepared in response to HB 2387.

2. Summary Notes of March 3, 1999

The summary notes of the March 3, 1999, meeting were approved as submitted.

3. Student Participation in JBAC Meetings

Elaine Yandle-Roth noted the JBAC had previously agreed that student participation in Commission activities was desirable, provided that an interested student (or students) could be identified. Yandle-Roth reported that she had unsuccessfully attempted to contact a student recommended by CCOSAC (Community Colleges of Oregon Student Associations and Commissions) to invite them to our meeting.

Members reiterated their desire to have student participation, and the suggestion was made to send letters of invitation to OSA (Oregon Student Association) and CCOSAC, listing "who we are" "what we do" and "when we meet" so that they can delegate students to attend if they so wish. In the letter we should remind these organizations that if they are unable to attend, the JBAC is still a ready resource to them should they know of students experiencing transfer problems.

This is an item that should be included in our annual report to the Joint Boards.

4. Report on March Academic Council Meeting re: WR 115

Roy Arnold reported that JBAC Chair Martha Anne Dow attended the meeting of the Academic Council in March and reviewed the process for identifying "college level" and "non-college-level" WR 115 courses. Academic officers at the community colleges and OUS campuses have been requested to respond to her in writing after a review of WR 115 courses has been conducted. Reports are due by June 15, 1999.

5. Report on Oregon Co-Enrollment Advisory Committee (OCEAC) Meeting

Janine Allen and Jim Arnold reported that the initial organizational meeting of the Oregon Co-Enrollment Advisory Committee (OCEAC) was held on March 8th at Chemeketa Community College. The group decided that constructing a database of co-enrolled students was a desirable goal. A pilot project is to be initiated. Two subcommittees have been assigned, one on legal issues and another on technology issues. The technology group has had one meeting, on April 20th. Minutes from both meetings are posted on the web at http://www.ossc.state.or.us/oceac.html.

J. Arnold reminded the group that the formation of this group can be traced back to the JBAC's own Student Services Action Team and that group's recommendations in the areas of financial aid and student information.

The JBAC would like to have further reports on the activities of OCEAC. Perhaps Kathy Campbell, the group's chair, can be invited.

The observation was made that the community colleges have a distance learning group that may overlap with the goals of OCEAC. It may be desirable to invite the involvement of Terri Johanson, Director of Distance Education for the Oregon Community Colleges, in OCEAC discussions.

6. Student Transfer Committee: Report of April 14th Meeting

Dave Phillips reported on the meeting of the Student Transfer Committee, held on April 14th at OIT Metro.

Writing and Reading courses were discussed, with an update first on the progress made in addressing the WR 115 problems. Then, the observation was made that some problems may exist for Reading courses, not all of which may be "college level." There appears to be no standard for these courses around the state. These courses have not been demonstrated to be a system-wide problem in the transfer area. At some point, if the JBAC wished to address these courses, though, a similar process to that used for WR 115 might be considered.

The issues surrounding the transfer of organic chemistry courses/credits were then addressed. Organic chemistry is offered at the lower-division level at community colleges and at the upper-division level at OUS institutions. A direct transfer of lower-division credits is generally not at issue, but some students are disadvantaged in the process of taking the courses for lower-division credit at a community college. Existing policies and practices are not consistent across OUS. A standardized policy that would allow for granting of upper-division credit at OUS institutions is sought. The transfer committee examined the agreed-upon policy from the 1991 common course numbering process and found it to have merit in its basic intent and structure. Using that policy language as a starting point, the transfer committee developed a proposed policy for JBAC consideration.(And this proposed policy was subsequently examined by chemistry department representatives at OSU, PSU, and UO.) The policy agreed upon by the chemistry department representatives was:

Conditions for Granting Upper-Division Credit for Community College Organic Chemistry

The full-year, 200-level organic chemistry lecture and laboratory sequence from an Oregon community college may be transferred to an OUS institution as equivalent to Chemistry 331, 332 and any organic laboratory course(s) associated with Chemistry 331 or 332, with upper-division credit granted under the following conditions:

1. The student receives a grade of C or better each term.

2. The student takes a recent standardized American Chemical Society Examination for the full-year organic course, and receives a score representing a national ranking at or above the 50th percentile. This examination is to be administered by the instructor of the community college course, and the results communicated in writing to the OUS institution.

3. The number of upper-division credits granted can be no more than the credits transferred, and will not exceed the total combined credits for Chemistry 331, 332, and any organic laboratory course(s) associated with Chemistry 331 or 332 at the OUS institution to which the courses are being transferred.

JBAC members generally accepted this language, but was amended to read:

Conditions for Granting Upper-Division Credit for Community College Organic Chemistry

The full-year, 200-level organic chemistry lecture and laboratory sequence from an Oregon community college may be transferred to an OUS institution as upper-division credit equivalent to Chemistry 331, 332 and any organic laboratory course(s) associated with Chemistry 331 or 332. with upper-division credit granted under the following conditions:

1. The student receives a grade of C or better each term.

2. The student takes the a recent standardized American Chemical Society Examination for the full-year organic course, and receives a score representing a national ranking at or above the 50th percentile, and provides a copy of the official examination score to the receiving OUS institution. This examination is to be administered by the instructor of the community college course, and the results communicated in writing to the OUS institution.

3. The number of upper-division credits granted can be no more than the credits transferred, and will not exceed the total combined credits for Chemistry 331, 332, and any organic laboratory course(s) associated with Chemistry 331 or 332 at the OUS institution to which the courses are being transferred.

Additional comments made during the discussion included:

The policy language above was agreed upon and is to be forwarded both to the Council of Instructional Administrators (Phillips will initiate discussion at the CIA's May 14th meeting) and the Academic Council (J. Arnold will schedule as an agenda item ASAP). The goal is to have a standard policy adopted by OUS and then have it widely communicated to all constituencies.

NOTE: J. Arnold subsequently circulated another revision to the policy to JBAC members via email and the following was adopted as the version to be forwarded to CIA and Academic Council:

Proposed Policy Regarding the Transfer of Organic Chemistry Courses Between
Oregon Community Colleges and Oregon University System Institutions

In recognition of the issues associated with the special case of organic chemistry, which is offered at the lower-division (200-level) at Oregon community colleges, and offered at the upper-division (300-level) at Oregon University System (OUS) institutions, the following policy applies to the transfer of such credits.

The transfer of organic chemistry courses/credits from an Oregon community college to an OUS institution may proceed in either of two ways:

(1) as a direct transfer of lower-division undergraduate credits, or

(2) as upper-division credits according to the following guidelines.

The full-year, 200-level organic chemistry lecture and laboratory sequence from an Oregon community college shall be transferred to an OUS institution as upper-division credit equivalent to Chemistry 331/332 and any organic laboratory course(s) associated with Chemistry 331/332, provided the student

(a) receives a grade of C or better each term in the organic chemistry sequence, and

(b) takes the standardized American Chemical Society Examination for the full-year organic course, scores at or above the 50th percentile on a national ranking, and provides an official copy of their score to the receiving OUS institution.

Further, the number of upper-division credits granted shall be no more than the credits transferred, and shall not exceed the total combined credits for Chemistry 331/332 and any organic laboratory course(s) associated with Chemistry 331/332 at the OUS institution to which the courses are being transferred.

Arnold and Phillips will report back to the JBAC on the CIA and Academic Council deliberations.

The next item considered by the Transfer Committee was the possibility of an Associate of Science Transfer Degree. The conclusion of the group was that an AS transfer degree was not warranted at this time.

The final item that the Transfer Committee considered was the topic of convening faculty groups. There are good reasons to consider such meetings, including discussion of issues related to course content and course numbering. There are presently few resources to finance such meetings, but if support can be gathered from the CIA and the Academic Council, then perhaps such meetings are possible.

Is it possible to convene faculty discipline groups at the Fall conference of OUS and the community colleges? Should there be a special invitation to faculty to attend, with breakout sessions designed for them in the afternoon?

All science faculty for the community colleges regularly get together every fall before classes start. Can OUS faculty be involved to some extent in this meeting for purposes of discussion of common issues?

JBAC concluded that convening faculty groups can probably happen if the senior academic administrators are behind the idea. JBAC endorses the concept and urges the CIA and Academic Council to act on this.

7. Science Courses: 3 credits/4 credits

Yandle-Roth introduced Dennis Gilbert, a faculty member from Lane Community College (LCC) , who joined the meeting by phone. Gilbert desires to introduce an astronomy course at LCC for 4 credits. This would not be a lab course, however, and 4 or 5 credit courses in the sciences are generally understood to have incorporated lab work into them. OUS institutions expect that 4 or 5 credit science courses from community colleges have an associated lab. Gilbert posed various questions about this situation, such as the possibility of configuring the course as a "3+1" course, with two course numbers, for a total of 4 credits, the same credit granted at UO for a comparable course.

JBAC members agreed that it would be desirable to have a mechanism in place that would minimize confusion about what is a lab course and what is not. The suggestion was made that, at least in this instance, the course description for this offering should clearly indicate that this is a non-laboratory course. Further, LCC should advise other community colleges as well as OUS institutions that 4-hour science courses which do not include a lab are possible.

8. JBAC Workplan Report

Yandle-Roth gave a brief update on where JBAC stood relative to the several items on its workplan, then Judy Patterson reviewed several items of interest to JBAC as they have implications across sectors.

9. JBAC Website Recommendations

J. Arnold reminded the group that he is still soliciting ideas for improvement of the JBAC website. Recommendations offered at this time were:

10. Credit for Prior Learning Report

Marylee King joined the group via phone. King and Yandle-Roth introduced the latest version of report from the Credit for Prior Learning Action Team. The report is slightly revised from last time, dropping a previous recommendation made directly to the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. The current list of recommendations, as amended, includes:

1. Courses completed through competency-based assessment methods be accepted for transfer among all Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges (NASC) accredited postsecondary institutions in Oregon.

2. Compliance with NASC and CAEL standards related to competency-based assessment be assumed required for credits granted for life experience or other options.

3. Accurate information about the use and transferability of each of the options for gaining credit for competency-based assessment be made available to students.

King noted that the major recommendation is #1, that ALL CPL credits be accepted for transfer.

The suggestion was made to replace the word "competency" with "proficiency" in the report to make it more consistent with the vocabulary used in Oregon.

The group suggested that these recommendations be forwarded to the academic administrators of the community colleges and OUS institutions with the request that they be discussed. What reaction(s) do these recommendations elicit?

11. Adjournment and Next Meeting

The meeting was adjourned at 12:50 p.m. The next meeting is scheduled for June 2, 1999, 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at OIT Metro.

Prepared by Jim Arnold
OUS Academic Affairs
May 11, 1999